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View Full Version : Asus g751jy thermal grease, can someone recomend some good grease manufacturers?



myth77
03-02-2018, 12:18 PM
I have this laptop for few years, but lately temperatures were high..so i decided to replace thermal paste...but when i removed heat sink i could see something else then paste, different then the paste...on nvram chips...so i googled it and it seems like some gum that is cooling nvram chips and other parts of the gpu...something called thermal grease..But, what i couldnt find is there any place to buy it? can someone recomend to me some good grease manufacturer?
i can use old thermal pads..but i wont to use something close to original. I attached the picture to be exact on what i am thinking.
Thank you!

72061

ciccio80
03-02-2018, 10:51 PM
I have the same notebook. I use Arctic MX-4 both for CPU-GPU and for the Vram chips.
It is cheap, lowers temperatures quite a lot and is NOT conductive! (so you won't risk frying anything). My temps on high load are <65C on GPU and <81C on CPU. So It should be good enough. Plus this paste usually mantains good performances for many years.

Korth
03-02-2018, 10:56 PM
It's Thermal Interface Material (TIM), commonly called Thermal Paste or Thermal Grease.

ASUS (and every other manufacturer) uses standard industrial-grade cheap-in-bulk TIMs. You won't be able to find exactly replacements, but premium-grade TIMs are commonly available and fairly inexpensive. You'll find a lot of premium TIMs on the market though. Aggressive overclockers want only the best of the best. Many routinely repaste their devices, automatically disdaining the factory goop in favour of their own preferred TIM brands.

Every premium-branded TIM has zealous champions, there are many online comparisons/reviews which rate "laboratory" benchmarks of TIMs side by side. The truth is that any premium TIM generally outperforms the ASUS standard TIM but the ASUS goop was also good enough for the job, some people claim great (even outrageous) improvements in their temps after repastes but I always read their numbers with some skepticism, the ASUS goop can be certainly upgraded but it's also not the component which usually bottlenecks cooling performance.

I would recommend Arctic Silver 5 for the "paste" and Startech Heatsink Thermal Foam for the "pads". The whole idea is for the TIM to fill the void between mating surfaces, but also to use as little of it as possible since even the best possible TIM goop isn't as thermally conductive as the metal heatsinks it's joining. AS5 is not always the best-of-the-best-of-the-best but it's always in the top-tier performers, it's cheap and common and general-purpose, and (unlike most other branded TIMs I've tried) I know it'll last at least a few years between applications before it all cooks off.

Just as important as the choice of TIM is the application of TIM. Not too much, not too little, full even coverage. Sometimes this requires a different TIM with a different viscosity or properties for optimum heat transfer between different surface geometries, the very best possible thermal performance might even require multiple TIMs on different parts of the same machine. It pays to read some guides and watch some vids about processor or graphic card or laptop repasting, but again I would take most of the reported (usually biased) numbers with a little skepticism.

I recommend avoiding "liquid metal" and "phase change" and "reflow" TIMs on first-time applications. Focus on learning how to apply the TIM correctly but be realistic and allow for the possibility of having to re-apply it after less-than-satisfactory first attempt(s) - the exotic TIMs have different application methods and, they're more costly and often only provide 1-2 applications and, most importantly, removing them (to clean the surfaces for new application) is a serious chore you will quickly regret.

myth77
03-05-2018, 06:19 AM
It's Thermal Interface Material (TIM), commonly called Thermal Paste or Thermal Grease.

ASUS (and every other manufacturer) uses standard industrial-grade cheap-in-bulk TIMs. You won't be able to find exactly replacements, but premium-grade TIMs are commonly available and fairly inexpensive. You'll find a lot of premium TIMs on the market though. Aggressive overclockers want only the best of the best. Many routinely repaste their devices, automatically disdaining the factory goop in favour of their own preferred TIM brands.

Every premium-branded TIM has zealous champions, there are many online comparisons/reviews which rate "laboratory" benchmarks of TIMs side by side. The truth is that any premium TIM generally outperforms the ASUS standard TIM but the ASUS goop was also good enough for the job, some people claim great (even outrageous) improvements in their temps after repastes but I always read their numbers with some skepticism, the ASUS goop can be certainly upgraded but it's also not the component which usually bottlenecks cooling performance.

I would recommend Arctic Silver 5 for the "paste" and Startech Heatsink Thermal Foam for the "pads". The whole idea is for the TIM to fill the void between mating surfaces, but also to use as little of it as possible since even the best possible TIM goop isn't as thermally conductive as the metal heatsinks it's joining. AS5 is not always the best-of-the-best-of-the-best but it's always in the top-tier performers, it's cheap and common and general-purpose, and (unlike most other branded TIMs I've tried) I know it'll last at least a few years between applications before it all cooks off.

Just as important as the choice of TIM is the application of TIM. Not too much, not too little, full even coverage. Sometimes this requires a different TIM with a different viscosity or properties for optimum heat transfer between different surface geometries, the very best possible thermal performance might even require multiple TIMs on different parts of the same machine. It pays to read some guides and watch some vids about processor or graphic card or laptop repasting, but again I would take most of the reported (usually biased) numbers with a little skepticism.

I recommend avoiding "liquid metal" and "phase change" and "reflow" TIMs on first-time applications. Focus on learning how to apply the TIM correctly but be realistic and allow for the possibility of having to re-apply it after less-than-satisfactory first attempt(s) - the exotic TIMs have different application methods and, they're more costly and often only provide 1-2 applications and, most importantly, removing them (to clean the surfaces for new application) is a serious chore you will quickly regret.

Thank you very much!

navis995
03-11-2018, 02:50 PM
Instead of the grease go for pads as the result will be the same but less messy next time you'll want to repaste your chips.

Instead of grease for the die's use Liquid Metal like Collabrium Liquid Ultra, you'll see huge drops in temperatures.

Gps3dx
03-12-2018, 01:33 AM
Instead of the grease go for pads as the result will be the same but less messy next time you'll want to repaste your chips.

Instead of grease for the die's use Liquid Metal like Collabrium Liquid Ultra, you'll see huge drops in temperatures.

I've teared-down and reassemble my G751JT lately.
I've read a lot into the TIM subject, and understood that choosing "liquid metals" TIM for laptops is just a waste of money.
if you're into DESKTOP O/C - then it's another subject... but since O/C on your G751 serie is somewhat limited... you'll be just fine with TIM paste.
I'd recommend you to AVOID TIM pads, since they dry up quickly + their thermal conductivity is LOWER then most TIM pastes.

From personal experience, I recommend you also perform the "FAN INTAKE MOD" (https://rog.asus.com/forum/showthread.php?78745-Another-Laptop-Intake-Mod-for-G751JY) - since it will lower your min & max temps by ~15-20 C.
it will of course void your warranty.

Korth
03-12-2018, 02:35 AM
TIM pads are never as thermally conductive (efficient at transferring heat) as TIM pastes/greases. The advantage of pads is their big foamy bulk, good for filling big gaps (measured in multiple millimeters or fractions of an inch) so that hot parts can still have "some" direct contact with heatsink surfaces in awkward geometries, stuff like graphic card backplates that you couldn't possibly fill up with 1/8" thickness of thermal paste.

For parts with tight tolerances - CPU coolers, GPU coolers, etc - a thermal pad is a lousy choice. What you may gain in convenient application, removal, and reapplication you'll pay for many times over in temp-throttled performance. There's no point in repasting or replacing the TIM at all if you're going to replace an average-performance low-cost TIM paste with a weak-performance middly-cost TIM pad. TIM pads are only used on low-power processors, stuff like Atom or ARM or low-end Celerons, you don't want to use it in a higher-end gaming laptop.

navis995
03-12-2018, 03:42 PM
Well I use pads tim and intake mod all together guys :)

The pads are used on VRAM modules, transistors and other connectors on GPU board, while the actual chip is covered in TIM, same for CPU.

I hope it makes more sense this way.

kingjezdi
04-05-2018, 11:38 AM
the pads only on the vram chips?
and past eon CPU and GPU ?

Darnassus
04-05-2018, 06:18 PM
Place the sink on the chips bare

Look at it

Do they all meet?

If so, then just use MX-4 on everything.

If not? Use K5 Pro Gummy

I just use MX-4 on everything, works no problem..


MX-4 is best all rounder, it doesn't conduct as it is carbon based.

But yes, your old paste is like, a mass manufactured 'goo' which is applied in big strips, like bubblegum tape.. then sandwiched between the chips.

navis995
04-12-2018, 09:29 PM
the pads only on the vram chips?
and past eon CPU and GPU ?


pads on vram chips, transistors, anything that isnt gpu die
on the die itself put the thermal paste or liquid metal

on the cpu die you put the same thermal paste or liquid metal as well

Korth
04-13-2018, 04:26 AM
Any heatsink which has a tight "direct contact" fit, basically screwed and bolted in place and designed to press against the hot part, CPU cooler, GPU cooler, etc - use a thermal paste/grease.

Any heatsink which doesn't have a tight fit, has a visible air gap between heatsink and hot part, GPU backplate, RAM heatspreaders, etc - use a thermal foam/pad.

No single TIM can be engineered to be "perfect" in every way (because it that was possible then there wouldn't be so many different TIMs on the market) - and again, as I said above, the "best" TIM for the job might actually be a variety of TIMs, different types for different parts in the same machine. But any premium TIM will still be an upgrade over the ASUS industrial goop ... if it's a smart choice for the part(s) it covers, and if it's correctly applied.