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Masheen
04-14-2012, 04:04 AM
I own an Asus G74SX-A1 as I said in the title and I decided to go ahead and put Linux on the second 750 GB HDD. The problem I ran into is that I can't set the boot priority to that HDD in the BIOS. Currently, the firmware version is 2.01.1204.

The only way I've been able to successfully boot from that drive is to select the boot override on the last page of the BIOS. Originally when I enter the BIOS the only two boot priority options given are windows and the blu-ray drive. When I select the boot override on the page with the boot priority options, I can then manipulate it to have the second hard drive as the primary, but when I save and exit it doesn't save the changes and boots straight to windows.

I called tech support after trying for a couple hours to get this to work and that was exactly no help. I've never flashed my motherboard's firmware before and I heard you can do some real damage if you mess it up so I was trying to avoid it up until now. If anyone thinks that will help I'll try it.

Also, I tried searching for similar problems but didn't find them. I apologize if this is a previously solved issue.

Thanks!

BrodyBoy
04-14-2012, 07:34 AM
What if you hit ESC at power-up to open the boot menu? Is your 2nd HDD listed there as a boot option?

Masheen
04-14-2012, 02:13 PM
Yes, it does show up when I hit esc, forgot about that one. And it boots fine when selected. The only place it seems to really be a problem is in boot priorities. In boot priorities it's not even an option. If I go to "Hard Drive BBS Priorities" near the bottom on the boot screen of the BIOS, then I can switch my second hard drive to #1. It doesn't do any good though, because no matter which save option I use, it won't save the changed priorities.

Thanks in advance for any advice.

Zygomorphic
04-14-2012, 04:13 PM
Work around:

When installing LINUX, tell it that the bootloader goes on the first drive (probably "/dev/sda1") It will find all the bootable partitions, including those on other drives. I have done that. In fact, Ubuntu will do that automatically. It recognizes which drive is the first boot one, and puts the GRUB loader on it. Rest assured, it will find Windows partitions on all the drives in the system. I have my system running that way.

Masheen
04-14-2012, 05:07 PM
Ubuntu was the version I went with and I don't recall changing any settings related to grub. That aside, I don't really want to reinstall everything just to put grub on the windows partition. At that point I suppose I would just continue hitting esc. Anyway, if anyone has other ideas to try, I'd be more than happy to hear them.

I may try reading up on EZFlash or switching the physical HDD ports to make sure I don't brick the computer trying to fix this little annoyance.

BrodyBoy
04-14-2012, 07:08 PM
Ubuntu was the version I went with and I don't recall changing any settings related to grub. That aside, I don't really want to reinstall everything just to put grub on the windows partition. At that point I suppose I would just continue hitting esc. Anyway, if anyone has other ideas to try, I'd be more than happy to hear them.

I may try reading up on EZFlash or switching the physical HDD ports to make sure I don't brick the computer trying to fix this little annoyance.

If you want to retain the ability to easily choose between your Linux and Windows installations, the boot menu at start up is pretty easy (short of re-installing, if necessary, to put grub on there).

I don't expect that a BIOS flash would impact this particular issue at all, but if you do want to update your BIOS, just follow these Easy Flash instructions (http://www.mediafire.com/view/?vdg51lpjqcmrjqv) carefully. It's pretty low-risk if you do it this way....the many problems you read about are due to the fact that Asus doesn't provide these instructions, so some owners unknowingly use WinFlash, or use an NTFS drive with Easy Flash, both of which greatly increase the chances of a failed BIOS flash.

Also, physically swapping the drives wouldn't make any difference. There is no "hard wiring" or specific enumeration to the SATA drive assignments.

Zygomorphic
04-14-2012, 11:10 PM
How did you install Ubuntu? If you run the standard installer in Ubuntu, it will by default put GRUB on the 1st boot HDD/SSD. It will go and find all the different bootable partitions and add them to the list automatically. It can even boot LINUX inside an extended logical partition. Out of curiosity, which version of Ubuntu are you using? My advice is 12.04. Albeit in final beta, it is quite reliable. At least the Kubuntu distro is: I couldn't stand the Unity interface. If someone has advice on a good KDE distro, let me know. (K)Ubuntu 11.10 has some wireless bugs that are a pain to work around. 10.04 LTS is reliable, but does not support the backlit keyboards, which are supported under LINUX kernel 3.2 (which comes with 12.04).