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ikissedyou
04-18-2012, 04:59 PM
I've recently just started schooling and i do need to install softwares like Microsoft Office, Adobe CS5.5 etc. I was wondering, if i should install those programs in the C drive, or the other drives? I'm using a G74SX 1 TB (4 Partitions, C/D/E/F). Is there a difference if i'm installing it in other drives than on C drive? I realised a slower start up process after i install those softwares

xeromist
04-18-2012, 05:14 PM
Windows start up time is slower or the time to start the programs is slower? Windows might be slower because those programs install bits that load when Windows loads. This will be about the same regardless of which partition they are on. I would recommend using MSConfig or options within the software programs themselves to disable them from running on start up unless you need them to do it.

BrodyBoy
04-18-2012, 06:20 PM
I'm using a G74SX 1 TB (4 Partitions, C/D/E/F). Is there a difference if i'm installing it in other drives than on C drive?
Chances are, you have two 500Gb hard drives, with two partitions on each one. Since your OS partition is probably over 200Gb, you shouldn't run out of room on it...even with the big programs you're installing.

Assuming you do, in fact, have two HDDs, it's good practice to save your data over on the E: and F: partitions (i.e., on the other hard drive). Most programs, including CS5.5 and Office, can be set to save their data to whatever default location you want.

Ultimately, what you want is Windows and your programs on the OS drive, and then all your personal data organized over on the other partitions.

ikissedyou
04-19-2012, 09:58 AM
Chances are, you have two 500Gb hard drives, with two partitions on each one. Since your OS partition is probably over 200Gb, you shouldn't run out of room on it...even with the big programs you're installing.

Assuming you do, in fact, have two HDDs, it's good practice to save your data over on the E: and F: partitions (i.e., on the other hard drive). Most programs, including CS5.5 and Office, can be set to save their data to whatever default location you want.

Ultimately, what you want is Windows and your programs on the OS drive, and then all your personal data organized over on the other partitions.

Yup, i have 2 500GBs hard drives, around 200GB per partition. So you mean it doesn't matter where my programs are in which drives, as long as the work i did (Personal Data) to be saved unto another partition (E/F)?

PS: Will i be able to Cut and Paste my entire Office program folder, from my C: partitions to D: and still work? Since while installing it doesn't give me the options to choose where i want my programs to be stored in.

ikissedyou
04-19-2012, 09:59 AM
Windows start up time is slower or the time to start the programs is slower? Windows might be slower because those programs install bits that load when Windows loads. This will be about the same regardless of which partition they are on. I would recommend using MSConfig or options within the software programs themselves to disable them from running on start up unless you need them to do it.

Windows start up is slower. Thanks for the reply, will try using MSConfig later on!

Peregrine
04-19-2012, 01:38 PM
PS: Will i be able to Cut and Paste my entire Office program folder, from my C: partitions to D: and still work? Since while installing it doesn't give me the options to choose where i want my programs to be stored in.

No you cannot just move the folder. It will break everything.
It always gives you the choice where to install. When installing look for an option like: Custom Install or Advanced install or something like that. If you choose "Standard install" this is when it doesn't give you a choice where too put it.

ikissedyou
04-19-2012, 02:25 PM
No you cannot just move the folder. It will break everything.
It always gives you the choice where to install. When installing look for an option like: Custom Install or Advanced install or something like that. If you choose "Standard install" this is when it doesn't give you a choice where too put it.

Thanks for your reply, i re-installed my Office and chose Custom, and there it is, the location to be installed, i've always thought Custom installs are for choosing the programs in Office that you don't want to be installed.

BrodyBoy
04-19-2012, 05:27 PM
Yup, i have 2 500GBs hard drives, around 200GB per partition. So you mean it doesn't matter where my programs are in which drives, as long as the work i did (Personal Data) to be saved unto another partition (E/F)?
Exactly. The point is that you want to "spread things" out on your partitions. There are some good reasons for this.


You don't keep filling up any one partition and having to re-arrange your files to make space.
Back-ups and system images are much easier when programs and user data are kept in discrete locations.
A hard disk crash won't destroy both your WIndows installation and your data.
(And because backups are easier, chances are that you actually did them...making a crashed HDD an inconvenience, but not a disaster.)

Do keep in mind that those partitions are not set in stone. If having two equal partitions on each HDD isn't the ideal set up for you, it's easy enough to re-arrange them....re-sizing, adding or subtracting partitions to best suit your needs. It is easiest, however, to make those changes before you put a lot of programs & data on your drives.



PS: Will i be able to Cut and Paste my entire Office program folder, from my C: partitions to D: and still work? Since while installing it doesn't give me the options to choose where i want my programs to be stored in.
No....you can't just "move" most programs; you need to install them in the location where you want them. I would recommend that you go ahead and install programs themselves in the default location on your C: drive, then set them up to save their data on the other drives.

There are two parts to getting this set up...once done, it works seamlessly.


Move your Windows Libraries to the new locations where you want them. Your "Documents" library, for example, currently includes one location on your C: drive. You can move that over to another partition, and set it as the default save location for document files. You could also add other library locations, make custom folders, etc., and set one of those as the default save location, if you prefer.
In each of your programs, like Word or CS5.5, etc., set the location where you want it to save your data files. Almost all programs that generate data files allow you to do this.

After you get it set up this way, it's easy to keep tings organized. Most programs, when you install them, set their default save locations to the appropriate Windows library for their data type. (Programs that generate image files, for example, will save to the "Photos" folder.) So once your default Library save locations are on the other hard drive, most programs will save there automatically....you won't even need to change it manually.

ikissedyou
04-20-2012, 06:33 AM
I kind of like installed most of my programs in the D: Drive (Games, Office, CS5.5, etc), then i'll probably move my personal data to E:/F: Drive. (Downloads, works, documents). Will that be okay?

BrodyBoy
04-20-2012, 07:34 AM
I kind of like installed most of my programs in the D: Drive (Games, Office, CS5.5, etc), then i'll probably move my personal data to E:/F: Drive. (Downloads, works, documents). Will that be okay?
Sure, that's fine.

ikissedyou
04-20-2012, 09:31 AM
Sure, that's fine.

Phew thats good, thought i would have to re-install everything again.

And as pointed out by xeromist, i've tried using MSConfig to disable some of the programs to start when i boot my computer. Its gotten better, but when i'm installing more and more programs (For school uses), the start up seems to be significantly slower. Is this normal?

And i have a few questions about the MSConfig as well:

Under MSConfig -> Boot Tap -> Advanced options. There is this "Number of Processors" and "Maximum Memory" check boxes. Will my Windows start up be faster if i check both of them?

zsld0423
04-20-2012, 03:08 PM
one program I've found to be pretty helpful is Soluto. It's free and operates like msconfig, but with a much better UI. It'll give you the time it takes each individual program to start up, and other useful info. And it'll tell you how long it takes your machine to finish booting completely

BrodyBoy
04-20-2012, 04:37 PM
Phew thats good, thought i would have to re-install everything again.

And as pointed out by xeromist, i've tried using MSConfig to disable some of the programs to start when i boot my computer. Its gotten better, but when i'm installing more and more programs (For school uses), the start up seems to be significantly slower. Is this normal?

And i have a few questions about the MSConfig as well:

Under MSConfig -> Boot Tap -> Advanced options. There is this "Number of Processors" and "Maximum Memory" check boxes. Will my Windows start up be faster if i check both of them?



It's normal for boot times to become slower as more & more programs are on board. Many programs have some little preload component that loads at boot, so that their actual start-up is faster when you go to use them. Something else to watch, with a lot of programs these days, is their auto-updaters. Many of them have a little service that runs and "phones home" to check for updates. Personally, I make a point of avoiding most of those....I just check manually every month or so.

Use msconfig very carefully. (I kind of think most owners should stay out of there, except for troubleshooting purposes.) Only stop or delay boot programs, or make other changes, that you are sure about. What you are seeing under the Advanced boot options is normal. Changing it won't make the machine faster.

ikissedyou
04-20-2012, 07:13 PM
It's normal for boot times to become slower as more & more programs are on board. Many programs have some little preload component that loads at boot, so that their actual start-up is faster when you go to use them. Something else to watch, with a lot of programs these days, is their auto-updaters. Many of them have a little service that runs and "phones home" to check for updates. Personally, I make a point of avoiding most of those....I just check manually every month or so.

Use msconfig very carefully. (I kind of think most owners should stay out of there, except for troubleshooting purposes.) Only stop or delay boot programs, or make other changes, that you are sure about. What you are seeing under the Advanced boot options is normal. Changing it won't make the machine faster.

Thanks for clearing up my doubt. Well i guess its just kinda "vexing?" for a machine like G74SX to start up this slowly

BrodyBoy
04-20-2012, 11:28 PM
Thanks for clearing up my doubt. Well i guess its just kinda "vexing?" for a machine like G74SX to start up this slowly
How slow are we talking....from the time you power up to the time you see your desktop? (And is your OS drive an HDD or SSD?)

ikissedyou
04-21-2012, 05:11 PM
(And is your OS drive an HDD or SSD?)

To be honest, i have no idea. Sorry i'm a noob when it comes to computers. But i didn't change any parts of the G74SX when i bought it (Other than adding in another 8GB of ram).


How slow are we talking....from the time you power up to the time you see your desktop?

About this, i haven't really time it exactly how long, i will during my next start up and post it in here.

PS:
time you power up to the time you see your desktop
By that you mean everything on my desktop? (Shortcuts, etc) <- Sorry for this noob question.

BrodyBoy
04-21-2012, 05:19 PM
If you don't know, we'll assume you have a regular hard drive. (There are G74 configurations that come with an SSD, but they are less common and considerably more expensive. It'd be hard to buy one accidentally. :)) What's the exact model number....on the sticker on the bottom?

So anyway, yeah......when I ask how long your boot time is, I just mean the time between hitting the power button and the first time you see the desktop.

ikissedyou
04-26-2012, 02:34 AM
Firstly, sorry for not being active in this thread (Since i'm the one who started it asking for help), been busy this few days.


So anyway, yeah......when I ask how long your boot time is, I just mean the time between hitting the power button and the first time you see the desktop.
I don't have a stopwatch in my phone (no idea why it doesn't have), so but looking at my phones clock, it took 1 minute+ (Around 1m30s) to 3 minute.


If you don't know, we'll assume you have a regular hard drive. (There are G74 configurations that come with an SSD, but they are less common and considerably more expensive. It'd be hard to buy one accidentally. ) What's the exact model number....on the sticker on the bottom?
Will check it when i off my G74 lol, get back ASAP

ikissedyou
04-26-2012, 04:37 AM
Got it, mine is G74SX-91232V