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pcorreiamd
06-09-2012, 05:06 AM
I am going to buy a G75vw (still waiting for the summer though) and while I was in the University I had this (old) notebook:

M50Vm
X86-based PC
Intel(R) Core(TM)2 Duo CPU T9400 @ 2.53GHz, 2534 Mhz
BIOS American Megatrends Inc. 207, 11-08-2008
RAM 4,00 GB
Windows Vista SP2 32
GeForce 9600M GS 1Gb

Because I didnt have so much time for gaming I stretched its life until today, is there any way to stretch its life 2 more months? Can I overclock the GPU to play some games? Thanks :confused:

Zygomorphic
06-11-2012, 02:10 AM
You may or may not be able to overclock the CPU, it depends on the BIOS. The video card should be overclockable via tools like Afterburner. It takes some practice, but as long as you don't up the voltages and [B]definitely do not[\B] turn off thermal monitoring, it should be safe. Since you have probably long since run out of warranty, there are not worries there. I am sure that the hard-core OC'ers will say that you need to play with the voltages to really OC a system to any reasonable level, and they are right.

The most I ever heard of anyone gaining in performance is a few FPS in benchmark, but what real gamer cares about those? ;) The real test is in real games, and everyone I've read seems to agree that it isn't worth it. My $0.02 is that is isn't worth the time, unless you want to use that system as a testbed to learn how to OC before you try it on your G75, which will have the cooling necessary to make it worth-while.

While I am on the subject of thermal envelope, check how hot your system is running without an OC, and if it runs real cool under load, then I say definitely consider at least a mild OC. If it is already a little hot under the collar, I wouldn't do it if I were you. OC'ing creates more heat, and notebooks, at least in recent years, have become notorious for running really hot--Macbook Pros are the worst. A whole industry has developed around the external, after-market cooling solutions for over-heating notebooks. Mega-Kudos to ASUS for producing the only gaming systems that seem to run at reasonable temps without a cooler. The G53SX runs at the same GPU temp with and without a cooler, I've checked it.

Best of luck! Congrats on the coming G75VW, and I hope this helps! :)

pcorreiamd
06-11-2012, 04:48 AM
Thanks Zygomorphic. Yes warranty is gone since end of 2010 :D. I have GPU tweak from Asus already but was waiting on a reply here. I have no idea for what temperatures I should be shooting at, but without running games the temp is at 63 C (A cleaning of the fans is overdue though). Any advice to what limits should I go? Thanks

Zygomorphic
06-11-2012, 11:52 AM
For safety's sake, I wouldn't go much higher than 70-75 C. If you are going to OC your notebook, definitely clean the fans thoroughly. The loss of warranty due to really opening the case is no longer and issue, as you mentioned :p. If the temps don't drop much, then I think you won't be able to put a good OC on it, but if they drop dramatically, say into the low-50's, you could definitely get a performance bump.

The means to overclocking regardless of the utility that you use is to start slow and build up. Run the Windows Experience Index, or else some other graphical benchmark to stress-test the system and ensure stability. If the system hangs or the driver crashes, then back off on the OC.

Try a small (say 15 MHz bump to core [30 MHz shader]) and see what happens. If it is stable, add another 5-10 (10-20) MHz and repeat. Once the system starts to act up, back off--use common sense. :) The memory also can be pushed, maybe 20-30 MHz at a time. Don't push the memory and the core/shaders on the same round, that way if something acts up, you know what the culprit is.

The whole OC game is a bunch of tweaking, and there is no better way to learn it than to do it. If you don't touch the voltages, there is no risk of damaging your system--though you could make it unstable till you reboot. Unlike CPUs, which require BIOS mods to overclock, GPUs are OC'ed by special utilities which are software-only mods. When the system reboots, the vBios will reset the clocks back to the defaults, so don't tell the utility of your choice to run at start-up until you have the system confidently stable.

Enjoy! Good luck! ASUS put out on the ROG site a nice little tutorial on OC'ing a desktop card, but the technique is the same.

Link:
http://rog.asus.com/96782012/graphics-cards-2/a-simple-guide-to-overclocking-your-graphics-card-with-gpu-tweak/

pcorreiamd
06-12-2012, 12:23 AM
Thanks a million. Yeah that was the guide I was using. Its the first time I will OC but better to blow up the M50 than the G75 :D. Hopefully with your instructions everything will be safe. ;)

Zygomorphic
06-12-2012, 01:38 AM
As long as you do what I said and don't increase voltages, there is zero risk. The worst that happens is your computer gets hot and shuts down--not a big deal. Just use common sense and don't run anything important while OC'ing your notebook; I look forward to seeing/hearing the results in the future!

P.S. Can you explain your avatar?

pcorreiamd
06-12-2012, 05:25 AM
P.S. Can you explain your avatar?

Ah first time somebody asks. I am a doctor, just graduated and I played Sims (seemed like a good choice last year). Hence the lack of time for playing games in the last years :D. I will let you know in a couple of weeks how it went the OCing. Thanks

Zygomorphic
06-12-2012, 12:51 PM
Ah first time somebody asks. I am a doctor, just graduated and I played Sims (seemed like a good choice last year). Hence the lack of time for playing games in the last years :D. I will let you know in a couple of weeks how it went the OCing. Thanks

Congratulations on graduation! That is a major achievement, now we have two doctors on the ROG forums. :) Now we know who to go to when we spill liquid nitrogen on our OC'ing little paws. :p

pcorreiamd
06-13-2012, 06:54 AM
Congratulations on graduation! That is a major achievement, now we have two doctors on the ROG forums. :) Now we know who to go to when we spill liquid nitrogen on our OC'ing little paws. :p

Thank you very much ;) I dont know who the other doctor is but I would like to. Yes now that I have more time I want my revenge on the video games MUAHAHAHAH :p. I hope the only advice people will need is about gaming :p but at this time everyone here is a better expert than me.

PS- In case of liquid nitrogen accidents just immerse the hands in water 39-42 C (102-108 F). It hurts the unfreezing but it is necessary to prevent more damage and dont forget to call Emergency 112 in Europe (911 US). If you cant because both hands are affected just try to find somebody to call for you. Don't use any clothes to cover the injuries because they can attach to the skin, use the hot water only or some other source of heating that does not go over 42 C or you risk getting a heat burn in addition to your cold burn. Prepare for blisters, infections and some scars over the next weeks. ;) Just in case.

Zygomorphic
06-13-2012, 07:08 PM
The other doctor is @DocNRock, a new overclocker, except he is doing desktops. You can find him in General Discussion sections. Oh, and thanks for the cold burn advice, just one thing, a lot of USA guys don't know SI units, so here is the temperature: 102-108 Fahrenheit. Thank you again, I just thought I would convert it for the USA people who aren't as comfortable with Celsius. Its something about the system you grow up with, I understand, that determines not how you work problems, but how you think.

xeromist
06-13-2012, 07:33 PM
The good news is that LN2 has such a low boiling point that it will literally boil upon contact with skin and the boiling gas will create a protective barrier that keeps the liquid off the skin. Now, immersion or other prolonged contact(such as a soaked glove) _will_ cause damage. That's why you don't see benchers with gloves...safer without them.

Sorry to derail but since we're on the subject of LN2 safety I thought it was worth mentioning.

Zygomorphic
06-13-2012, 09:44 PM
The good news is that LN2 has such a low boiling point that it will literally boil upon contact with skin and the boiling gas will create a protective barrier that keeps the liquid off the skin. Now, immersion or other prolonged contact(such as a soaked glove) _will_ cause damage. That's why you don't see benchers with gloves...safer without them.

Sorry to derail but since we're on the subject of LN2 safety I thought it was worth mentioning.

Absolutely true, I was simply having a little fun :). Newton's Law of Cooling is a differential equation, which means that the rate of temperature change is proportional to the absolute difference between the two objects. Hence liquid nitrogen is so cold (and thus delta T is high) that it's rate of warmth is large and thus boils instantaneously. I have seen the benchmarkers--on here!--pour LN2 on their bare hands and it rolls off. The key is to pour only a thin stream, so the LN2 boils on contact and the rest rides on the gas layer.

pcorreiamd
06-14-2012, 05:04 AM
The other doctor is @DocNRock, a new overclocker, except he is doing desktops. You can find him in General Discussion sections. Oh, and thanks for the cold burn advice, just one thing, a lot of USA guys don't know SI units, so here is the temperature: 102-108 Fahrenheit. Thank you again, I just thought I would convert it for the USA people who aren't as comfortable with Celsius. Its something about the system you grow up with, I understand, that determines not how you work problems, but how you think.

Thanks. I edited the post. In case somebody searches the forum instead of calling an ambulance it should be easy enough to follow :D. Yeah we use SI units and I studied in an International School so my base is English literature mostly based out of the UK and the US but the editions in Europe all come with SI units. I know US is very proud of its units like the brits are very proud of driving on the left side but for me people should just come to an understanding and decide on one unit :D. I am going to teach Portuguese in a Summer University in Czech Republic but when I return to Portugal I definitely will OC this brick of laptop. Cheers

pcorreiamd
06-14-2012, 05:36 AM
The good news is that LN2 has such a low boiling point that it will literally boil upon contact with skin and the boiling gas will create a protective barrier that keeps the liquid off the skin. Now, immersion or other prolonged contact(such as a soaked glove) _will_ cause damage. That's why you don't see benchers with gloves...safer without them.

Sorry to derail but since we're on the subject of LN2 safety I thought it was worth mentioning.

Well since we are going into detail :P. Lets make a few points:

1- The Nitrogen is more likely to blow due to its pressure in the cooler than leak on your hand (thus making a frostbite, a cold burn). The worst scenario is that the person handling it will have an explosion in their hands (this is the part I thought best to omit because its very rare :p) losing some fingers or even the hand, but It doesn't matter how bad it looks the treatment is always the same: protect the rest of the hands and rewarm the frozen parts before they lose the chance to repair themselves, just like I described before.

2- When exposed to room temp and pressure liquid Nitrogen will become a gas (but that is only good if the cooler doesn't blow and decides to leak slowly and of course if you are smart enough not to touch it). If it leaks with pressure some splashing will occur. You are right about the protective layer but this is good news for your muscles not your skin, it means that the part which hurt you first protects you from further damage. You will still have a frostbite. In case the contact is only with the vapors (like in the movies) there will be no injury ;).

3- Gloves (Cryo gloves) are debatable. We use them to take samples from the big Nitrogen tanks but we don't when we need to work in microscopes because it makes handling impossible and can cause more accidents. If you use gloves make sure its the Cryo type and not your typical skiing gloves ;). My recommendation is use them if you need to replace a broken unit but not when you are working around the cooling system.

I hope nobody is scared now. These are very rare accidents nowadays and you shouldn't be worried even if you are a noob like me. Just remember: its not good policy for computer manufacturers to blow their customers, and enjoy :D

xeromist
06-14-2012, 03:51 PM
All of the coolers used in overclocking as well as the duers and other transfer vessels are open containers. The only time it is sealed or under pressure is the original tank, which should be pressure safe. That's good advice though because a thermos makes a good pouring container and I could see an inexperienced person being tempted to cap it.