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ValenB5
06-22-2012, 01:34 AM
I'm a new owner of the Asus G75VW-DS72. I'm also a major noob & I have a few questions about the partitions on the 256GB SSD & the 750GB HDD:

1) Both the SSD & HDD came partitioned from the factory. They are partitioned into 2 partitions each, equaling a total of 4 partitions. What are the pros & cons of these partitions?

2) Do you recommend removing the partitions?

3) If yes, how is this accomplished?

4) What steps/procedures (e.g: Windows security updates, installing Internet security software, etc.) do you recommend for preparing this new laptop for use?

Cecil_2099
06-22-2012, 05:10 AM
1) Everyone's got a different opinion about partitions. I personally don't use partitions on a regular basis so I'm not a good resource for that, but from what I've heard (at least for a traditional HDD) disk fragmentation is reduced because the partition sizes places a sort of physical limit for that data writes on the actual physical hard drive platter. With an SDD disk fragmentation is a non-issue (in fact you should never degrag an SSD as that will reduce the operational life of the drive). If you like to have things very segregated then partitions are useful in that you have whole separate "drives" to store your data. The downside is that you may run out of space on one "drive" faster than you originally planned when you set up the partitions.

2) I prefer to remove the partitions and have the SSD as a single partition and the HDD as a single partition. This gives me the most room on my main boot drive (the SSD) for programs etc, and then I use the HDD as my data drive where I point browsers to have their downloads and temp files stored. Please note that the system comes with a hidden restore partition so make sure you DON'T remove it. It's about 25 GB in size.

3) First, back up your system if you have anything newly installed on your system. Second, update the AI Recovery utility to V1.0.24 by going to this link: http://rog.asus.com/notebook/17-inch/g75vw/ (click on Download, choose your OS, scroll down to Utilities, expand the tree and select the Global download link (not the DLM one). Third, make a new set of ASUS restore DVDs just in case you mess up the partitions and can't boot your system. If you need help using the DVDs, check the thread I made (link is in my signature). Fourth, check out this YouTube tutorial video on how to remove the partitions: Hard disk partition in windows 7 How to resize (Delete, Extend and Shrink)

(http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Hyhg-H5k6js)4) My typical routine is to install internet security software first while off-line, going online to update it, then downloading windows updates once the security software is up-to-date.

Hope this helps.

ValenB5
06-22-2012, 01:46 PM
Thank you very much for that very nicely detailed information, Cecil! :D:D:D

I'd like to get other people's opinions on the pros & cons of the partitions on the SSD & HDD drives that came with this new laptop. Am I losing out on anything by leaving those partitions alone?

john_from_ohio
06-22-2012, 02:23 PM
Thank you very much for that very nicely detailed information, Cecil! :D:D:D

I'd like to get other people's opinions on the pros & cons of the partitions on the SSD & HDD drives that came with this new laptop. Am I losing out on anything by leaving those partitions alone?

Cecil nailed it ... I think it is a very bad idea to have multiple partitions on your SSD ... you are just asking for an eventual "running out of space on C drive" issue. Use something like minitool partition wizard to get rid of D on your SSD ( backup everything first of course ) after perhaps copying anything on D over to C.

As far as multiple partitions on your other 2nd drive ... completely up to you ... but is there any specific reason you want to separate things out by partition on a data drive? If no good reason then consolidate into one.

On your boot drive there is probably the recovery partition ... should be reasonably small ... I would say keep it around ( why not ) ...

ValenB5
06-22-2012, 04:33 PM
Cecil nailed it ... I think it is a very bad idea to have multiple partitions on your SSD ... you are just asking for an eventual "running out of space on C drive" issue. Use something like minitool partition wizard to get rid of D on your SSD ( backup everything first of course ) after perhaps copying anything on D over to C.

As far as multiple partitions on your other 2nd drive ... completely up to you ... but is there any specific reason you want to separate things out by partition on a data drive? If no good reason then consolidate into one.

On your boot drive there is probably the recovery partition ... should be reasonably small ... I would say keep it around ( why not ) ...

Thank you very much for your reply, john_from_ohio!;)

I don't have any reason to separate things out by partition on a data drive. My G75 came with both the SSD & the HDD already partitioned and I'll gladly remove both partitions since both you & Cecil seem to advocate it. I'm a noob & I rely on advice from more knowledgeable people like you & Cecil.

Question: Should I remove the partitions on both drives before or after I perform those steps that you have posted in your "First things to do after purchasing G55/G75 based systems" thread here: http://rog.asus.com/forum/showthread.php?16944-First-things-to-do-after-purchasing-G55-G75-based-systems

MTDave
06-22-2012, 06:52 PM
ValenB5 - I'm at the same level of tech savvy as you. I also have the same thing with my new G75, so i was reading around too. I plan on taking john_from_Ohio's advice and update the recovery program, and make backup DVDs before i touch ANYTHING. Partitions I guess can be finicky - so personally, I won't be taking any chances - just in case.

john_from_ohio
06-22-2012, 10:04 PM
Thank you very much for your reply, john_from_ohio!;)

I don't have any reason to separate things out by partition on a data drive. My G75 came with both the SSD & the HDD already partitioned and I'll gladly remove both partitions since both you & Cecil seem to advocate it. I'm a noob & I rely on advice from more knowledgeable people like you & Cecil.

Question: Should I remove the partitions on both drives before or after I perform those steps that you have posted in your "First things to do after purchasing G55/G75 based systems" thread here: http://rog.asus.com/forum/showthread.php?16944-First-things-to-do-after-purchasing-G55-G75-based-systems

After that ... please ... and if you are wanting a completely recoverable "up to the minute" system ... do a win 7 backup ( maintenance ) and create a system image on an external hard drive before proceeding any further. Hey I like multiple kinds of backups ... a win 7 system image along with a Win 7 install disk ( at SP1 level ) will let you restore from that external drive ( independent of if you have install DVDs ) ...

Muskoka
06-22-2012, 10:06 PM
I don't know that there are really any pros/cons to having partitions in a situation where you aren't going to be using them.

Personally I bought a G75 that came with a 750 GB hard drive, I took that out and added a 240GB SSD and have partitioned it to approximately 220GB and 20 GB because I want to dual boot between Windows and linux. I'll probably add the 750GB HD back in once everything is stable and I'll probably re-partition it into a single partition to use as data. Or maybe down the road I'll by another SSD for that slot.

There are specific use cases for having partitions, but if you don't use your drives that way then I don't really see any benefit or drawback to having them partitioned.

You do probably want to keep your OS and Applications on the SSD and your data on the HDD though.

I think it is a good idea to use the AI Recovery utility to create the backup disks to reset to factory settings too. But, again, you can download a clean copy of Windows 7 from Microsoft really easily so you aren't really risking all that much.

Great article about setting up a new PC here: http://arstechnica.com/features/2012/06/blowing-away-bloatware-a-guide-to-reinstalling-windows-on-a-new-pc/

john_from_ohio
06-22-2012, 10:22 PM
I don't know that there are really any pros/cons to having partitions in a situation where you aren't going to be using them.

There are no pros ... agreed ... the cons are obvious ... ( or at least one of them is obvious ) ... you may run out of space available on your primary partition on your boot drive ... for no good reason.

Muskoka
06-22-2012, 10:57 PM
There are no pros ... agreed ... the cons are obvious ... ( or at least one of them is obvious ) ... you may run out of space available on your primary partition on your boot drive ... for no good reason.

I'm not sure I understand what you mean. You would still have the space, just in another place.

I guess if you had only 10 GB of free space left on one partition and ~350 GB left on the second partition and you wanted to install something that uses 20 GB that would mean the 10 GB on the first partition are kind of being wasted.

Are you talking about the actual OS running out of room for temporary files or caching or something?

The boot partition is already a separate partition and typically is created to be less than 100 MB.

I think partitions are a protection against running out of space in some circumstances, not a reason to run out of space.

For example you could protect your OS partition from running out of space by having a separate partition for apps and another for data. For applications that do a lot of logging this is important so that if some bug causes an app to create massive logs it will only use up it's own partition and can't use up space in the OS partition.

I guess for the OP's who said they aren't going to use the partitions and want to know what to do with them, I would just say, do whatever you want I don't think it matters. It might be cool/interesting for you to learn how to re-partition your drives into the way you want them, but if it is a headache or you are really anxious about breaking something (you shouldn't be, but some people are like that) then I think you would be fine leaving them how they are.

ValenB5
06-23-2012, 01:17 AM
I don't know that there are really any pros/cons to having partitions in a situation where you aren't going to be using them.

Personally I bought a G75 that came with a 750 GB hard drive, I took that out and added a 240GB SSD and have partitioned it to approximately 220GB and 20 GB because I want to dual boot between Windows and linux. I'll probably add the 750GB HD back in once everything is stable and I'll probably re-partition it into a single partition to use as data. Or maybe down the road I'll by another SSD for that slot.

There are specific use cases for having partitions, but if you don't use your drives that way then I don't really see any benefit or drawback to having them partitioned.

You do probably want to keep your OS and Applications on the SSD and your data on the HDD though.

I think it is a good idea to use the AI Recovery utility to create the backup disks to reset to factory settings too. But, again, you can download a clean copy of Windows 7 from Microsoft really easily so you aren't really risking all that much.

Great article about setting up a new PC here: http://arstechnica.com/features/2012/06/blowing-away-bloatware-a-guide-to-reinstalling-windows-on-a-new-pc/

I definitely will keep the OS on the SSD. However, I have a lot of downloadable-only games that I plan to install on to this laptop & I'm not sure if there will be enough space for all of them on the SSD. Will it be OK to install some of these games on the HDD?

Thanks very much for the link to that article!!! :)

john_from_ohio
06-23-2012, 01:22 AM
I definitely will keep the OS on the SSD. However, I have a lot of downloadable-only games that I plan to install on to this laptop & I'm not sure if there will be enough space for all of them on the SSD. Will it be OK to install some of these games on the HDD?


It will always be ok to install any games you want on the regular hard drive ... performance reading big game files will be better on the SSD and with a 256 gb SSD you have quite a bit of room ... but you always want to keep some reasonable amount of free space on the primary OS drive partition.

ValenB5
06-23-2012, 01:32 AM
It will always be ok to install any games you want on the regular hard drive ... performance reading big game files will be better on the SSD and with a 256 gb SSD you have quite a bit of room ... but you always want to keep some reasonable amount of free space on the primary OS drive partition.

Thank you very much for this info, john_from_ohio!:D