PDA

View Full Version : Asus AIO PC's for ROG



pongkie
11-01-2012, 08:23 AM
I'm searching for a nice gaming PC for windows 8. I looked into the G laptops and they where nice but no touch. so i looked into desktops they are too bulky that i have no room for that in my desk. Then I saw the AIO ET2300 it has touch but the graphics chip is nvdia GT 630m. I turned into asus' competitor and i saw one AIO pc with i7-3770T intel, AMD Radeon HD7850m, 8 gig memory, 27" touch screen, gesture voice controls even optional TV card.

I was wondering it would be very nice if Asus ROG Team would add AIO gaming desktops in thier line up since windows 8 is already out and developers are starting making games for touch. I'm not sure if there's market for this kind of PC's but since window 8 is out and tried some new windows 8 PC's. Touch is a must for me if windows 8 is the OS. Some argue that high end gamers don't need touch but for me it would be better if your computer can play small touch based games to high end games with any controller you like just plug it into your AIO.

I think Gaming AIO's will have a place in living rooms that everyone in the house can enjoy rather a bulky tower desktop.

SUKARA@ASUS
11-07-2012, 07:45 AM
Very Thanks your suggest!!
Of course!
design for customer needs!!

cl-scott
11-07-2012, 05:29 PM
The problem with AIO units is essentially the same as laptops: heat. With desktops you have a fair amount of space for the hot air to spread out and also more room for fans to be placed in order to pump the air out. With laptops and AIO units, there's not as much room for that, everything's all crammed together. So every extra BTU of thermal heat in a laptop and AIO is something that the system designers need to figure out how to deal with.

Not to appear as bashing a competitor, I actually met one of the engineers from this company and he was a nice guy, really helpful, plus he had absolutely nothing to do with this particular decision... The x305 series of the Toshiba Qossimo line was a real problem for my former employer. The problem was that Toshiba sandwiched two high end (for the time) video cards inside the unit, and the combined heat would result in the GPUs failing at a very high rate. The design engineers didn't adequately account for the heat being generated by these GPUs and things failed.

So considering you have to contend with the (surprising, believe me) amount of heat display panels can produce, being trapped in there with the heat from the rest of the unit's components, there's a limit to what can be done. Some competitors are more willing to risk catastrophic failure than others. I won't name names, because I honestly can't remember which company it was, but there was a vendor trying to stuff quad-core desktop CPUs into laptops, and the heat was literally melting the plastic casing of the laptop. Sadly it's not always as simple as just throwing in higher class components. Every BTU of heat generated is a BTU of heat that needs to be expelled from the unit somehow.

Class dismissed! :D

Shawnnepc
11-07-2012, 08:42 PM
The problem with AIO units is essentially the same as laptops: heat. With desktops you have a fair amount of space for the hot air to spread out and also more room for fans to be placed in order to pump the air out. With laptops and AIO units, there's not as much room for that, everything's all crammed together. So every extra BTU of thermal heat in a laptop and AIO is something that the system designers need to figure out how to deal with.

Not to appear as bashing a competitor, I actually met one of the engineers from this company and he was a nice guy, really helpful, plus he had absolutely nothing to do with this particular decision... The x305 series of the Toshiba Qossimo line was a real problem for my former employer. The problem was that Toshiba sandwiched two high end (for the time) video cards inside the unit, and the combined heat would result in the GPUs failing at a very high rate. The design engineers didn't adequately account for the heat being generated by these GPUs and things failed.

So considering you have to contend with the (surprising, believe me) amount of heat display panels can produce, being trapped in there with the heat from the rest of the unit's components, there's a limit to what can be done. Some competitors are more willing to risk catastrophic failure than others. I won't name names, because I honestly can't remember which company it was, but there was a vendor trying to stuff quad-core desktop CPUs into laptops, and the heat was literally melting the plastic casing of the laptop. Sadly it's not always as simple as just throwing in higher class components. Every BTU of heat generated is a BTU of heat that needs to be expelled from the unit somehow.

Class dismissed! :D

That would be Clevo ;)

cl-scott
11-07-2012, 10:09 PM
That would be Clevo ;)

It was some big name vendor, but then given Clevo tends to build reference model systems, it's entirely possible they were based off a Clevo design.

But just to kind of drive the point home again... It's not just as simple as throwing faster parts into a system. Sadly the laws of physics frequently get in the way of our "Wouldn't it be nice" fantasies.