PDA

View Full Version : Adding 8gb RAM to my G75



ChillKill
12-26-2012, 10:47 PM
Hello guys

i have a g75 bbk5 - 8gb RAM


I read the sticky of adding ram to the g75 and i pretty much understood everything and i dont want to downclock because i bought the wrong one i want to run on 1600mhz so id like to double check just in case before purchasing this 2x4gb from newegg.

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16820231512

Below is my specs.

Thanks in advance.

rewben
12-27-2012, 01:06 AM
it will work; just make sure they're seated properly.

for faster boot and app load times, i would also suggest you get a SSD.

Pitcher@asus
12-27-2012, 02:04 AM
yep, if you follow spec from ASUS website, it is able to use.

ChillKill
12-27-2012, 03:22 AM
Thank you for your respondes.

by seated you mean properly placed ? sorry english second language xD

GottiBoi55
12-27-2012, 03:24 AM
Yep, the 8GB set from newegg should work well, that is the correct CL, and timing.

rewben
12-27-2012, 05:32 AM
Thank you for your respondes.

by seated you mean properly placed ? sorry english second language xD

yes, properly placed :) you can check out this video (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MbPaR1Ci-Ug) to get the idea.

and don't worry about bad english (it's not my mother tongue, either); as long as we can guess the meaning that's fine; if not we will ask hehe

ChillKill
12-27-2012, 07:33 PM
Ok thanks for the responses very helpful
And another thing you guys feel major improvement in performance from.8gb to 16 gb ?

GottiBoi55
12-28-2012, 01:36 AM
Ok thanks for the responses very helpful
And another thing you guys feel major improvement in performance from.8gb to 16 gb ?


Yeah, you should see some performance boost.
My memory maxes out to 7.9 in the Win7 WEI

Zygomorphic
12-28-2012, 01:40 AM
Looks you are set! Just get a 2x4 GB matched set, don't worry too much about the vendor, though higher-quality brand-name is worth the money for the return policy if it doesn't work.

rewben
12-28-2012, 01:42 AM
it depends on your usage (for daily usage, some say even 8gb is too much); you might feel that there's no apparent improvements if you do not have something that actually make use of it.

in your case, i think a SSD is a better investment. a decent SSD will do; it will bring you some 'major performance improvements'.

fostert
12-28-2012, 03:46 AM
it depends on your usage (for daily usage, some say even 8gb is too much); you might feel that there's no apparent improvements if you do not have something that actually make use of it.

in your case, i think a SSD is a better investment. a decent SSD will do; it will bring you some 'major performance improvements'.

+1 for this. Unless you *routinely* fill *all 8GB* (say, to keep a pile of applications running) then going to 16GB will create no performance improvement, either real or perceptible. You WEI score will not change for just a size increase in RAM; I would think it measures memory operations per second, and not the quantity of RAM. It may change if the clock and/or the latency timings of the newly added RAM is different, since thats what impacts memory ops per second.
Get an SSD, my friend. For example, NCIX had an Intel 520 240GB SATA3 SSD on yesterday for $190. Thats a crazy good deal, IMO. Unfortunately that special is over and its now back to $270. Kicking myself for missing that, but i don't want to upgarde mysystem right now, since its working 100% perfectly, and I can't afford any down time.

Zygomorphic
12-28-2012, 11:27 AM
+1 @fostert! I have 16 GB of RAM, and it helps for me because I run VMs on a regular basis, and I wanted enough RAM for that. Also, the RAM was cheap and I was already going to disassemble the computer to upgrade the HDD. My G53SX is a bear to take apart :(. Most people wouldn't notice a difference, and a RAM disk is pretty much a waste, since an SSD is nearly as fast and a whole lot bigger (and accelerates Windows boot too).

On another note, @fostert, has Debian come out with a newer kernel? I am running 3.4.11 right now, and there are newer ones available. Are you not upgrading to prevent potential for system breakage? Also, there are newer nVidia LINUX drivers available now.

rewben
12-28-2012, 03:32 PM
+1 for this. Unless you *routinely* fill *all 8GB* (say, to keep a pile of applications running) then going to 16GB will create no performance improvement, either real or perceptible. You WEI score will not change for just a size increase in RAM; I would think it measures memory operations per second, and not the quantity of RAM. It may change if the clock and/or the latency timings of the newly added RAM is different, since thats what impacts memory ops per second.
Get an SSD, my friend. For example, NCIX had an Intel 520 240GB SATA3 SSD on yesterday for $190. Thats a crazy good deal, IMO. Unfortunately that special is over and its now back to $270. Kicking myself for missing that, but i don't want to upgarde mysystem right now, since its working 100% perfectly, and I can't afford any down time.

thanks, @fostert :)

i have a 16gb ram disk running at all times; i am thinking of extending it to 24gb when i don't run my VMs haha!

ChillKill
12-29-2012, 08:03 PM
ok great thanks guys ill order them today :D
and ill be lookin to get a ssd also soon

mrwolf
12-30-2012, 03:38 AM
Yea the SSD is an essential upgrade ! :) will make things 10x faster

fostert
12-30-2012, 06:37 AM
+1 @fostert! I have 16 GB of RAM, and it helps for me because I run VMs on a regular basis, and I wanted enough RAM for that. Also, the RAM was cheap and I was already going to disassemble the computer to upgrade the HDD. My G53SX is a bear to take apart :(. Most people wouldn't notice a difference, and a RAM disk is pretty much a waste, since an SSD is nearly as fast and a whole lot bigger (and accelerates Windows boot too).

Yeah, I too run a VM of Windows 7 under Debian. I really like Windows that way: controlled. When it inevitably corrupts itself after a few months use, I simply restore the VM using a snapshot and voila! Clean and well-behaved again. I tend to throw 8GB at it in the VM, and use the other 24GB for my data display program running in Linux.

I wish I could get an SSD and put it in, but I can't right now. I have two 500GB HDDs in my G74 that have a single 900 GB LVM partition spread across them, so I can't take one out without disrupting the whole linux install. And I don't want to do that right now, since my machine is my life and my productivity is priority while I'm working here in Penticton at the radio observatory. I've only got a year and want to spend it writing papers and doing research! So I need reliability right now, and not more speed/performance. If it ain't broke...


On another note, @fostert, has Debian come out with a newer kernel? I am running 3.4.11 right now, and there are newer ones available. Are you not upgrading to prevent potential for system breakage? Also, there are newer nVidia LINUX drivers available now.
I haven't tried kernel 3.4 yet...still happily running the older stable 3.2 that came with Debian squeeze 6.0. At kernel.org you can get the latest stable linux (3.7.1) now, and compile it yourself. I used to compile my own kernels back in the day (running slackware linux with kernel 1.2: that was in 1995),but now am just as happy using stable compiled versions that come with the distros (i'm into Debian at the moment). I'll get around to trying 3.7 probably next year when I return to my job in Brandon and life has settled back down. I don't like to muck about with upgrading to the latest NVIDIA linux drivers either, since I don't game and hence don't need the performance increments, and those drivers have always been twitchy to compile and get going right. Again, if it ain't broke....

Zygomorphic
12-30-2012, 01:21 PM
Yeah, I too run a VM of Windows 7 under Debian. I really
like Windows that way: controlled. When it inevitably corrupts itself after a
few months use, I simply restore the VM using a snapshot and voila! Clean and
well-behaved again. I tend to throw 8GB at it in the VM, and use the other 24GB
for my data display program running in Linux.

I am considering switching my native Win 8 install to a VM, since I never boot
to it, and it would make more sense there than as another partition using up
space that I will never use. Honestly, when I get my next computer in ~3 years,
I will definitely consider just having a native LINUX install with Windows
running in a VM. Nothing I really do can't be done from LINUX, and the
occassional Windows only program :mad: will just be run from a VM. I don't game,
so the lack of 3D-gfx support is a moot issue for me.

My present system configuration has too many Windows installs, so VMs would
probably be nicer and more portable. That way, I could move the Windows
installation more easily from one computer to the next.

Right now I have openSUSE 12.3 in a VM, as well as CentOS 6. VirtualBox is
awesome :) Out of curiosity, what VM program do you use?


I wish I could get an SSD and put it in, but I can't right
now. I have two 500GB HDDs in my G74 that have a single 900 GB LVM partition
spread across them, so I can't take one out without disrupting the whole linux
install. And I don't want to do that right now, since my machine is my life and
my productivity is priority while I'm working here in Penticton at the radio
observatory. I've only got a year and want to spend it writing papers and doing
research! So I need reliability right now, and not more speed/performance. If it
ain't broke...

Ditto. I have a 500GB Seagate Momentus Hybrid that I bought and a 640GB Hitachi
that came with the computer. The Hitachi is noticeably quieter, but the
performance jump is worth it. I thought about an SSD, but the price premium to
get enough space for all my VMs and OS installs would have been more than I was
willing to pay. The Hybrid drive is fast enough, and accelerates the OS boot,
which is what I wanted. openSUSE boots really, really fast now :) I totally
understand the side of "If it ain't broke...", I don't have the same level of
reliability constraints, which is why I mess around.


I haven't tried kernel 3.4 yet...still happily running the
older stable 3.2 that came with Debian squeeze 6.0. At kernel.org you can get
the latest stable linux (3.7.1) now, and compile it yourself. I used to compile
my own kernels back in the day (running slackware linux with kernel 1.2: that
was in 1995),but now am just as happy using stable compiled versions that come
with the distros (i'm into Debian at the moment). I'll get around to trying 3.7
probably next year when I return to my job in Brandon and life has settled back
down. I don't like to muck about with upgrading to the latest NVIDIA linux
drivers either, since I don't game and hence don't need the performance
increments, and those drivers have always been twitchy to compile and get going
right. Again, if it ain't broke....

How well do you like Debian? I used Ubuntu from 9.10 up to 11.04, and the
increase in the number of bugs drove me away. I tried 12.04.1 again, and it was
just about as bad. Fedora was pretty reliable, but getting the nVidia drivers
working was well nigh impossible. Since I update the gfx drivers whenever nVidia
comes out with a new one, the difficulty of getting the nVidia drivers working
was a sticking point for me. I am presently trying openSUSE, and it seems to
work quite well, just getting a LiveUSB installer working is all but impossible.
I like being able to try the distro out before installing it into my computer.
That's also why I now have my /home partition separated from the others.
Ubuntu's default was to have it all together, which annoyed me because it meant
that re-installing LINUX required backing everything up or loosing it, which was
a pain. Now with the /home on a separate partition, I can change distros without
loosing my files. :)

Of all the LINUX distros I've tried, Ubuntu 10.04 was the best, but they didn't
support my newer hardware very well (kernel 2.3X). Getting the wireless drivers
working was a pain, but once I got it configured, it worked. openSUSE 12.2 has
been perfectly stable, but the developer-preview of 12.3 in my VM needs a fair
amount of work. We shall see how reliable it turns out to be once the team
releases it officially. I have heard good things about Debian, just never tried
it.

tkolarik
12-31-2012, 04:37 AM
"Properly Seated"!!! I never had to push so hard to insert RAM! Tight fitting is good!

I used Patriot tha I bought at Frys for $40.

fostert
01-01-2013, 10:14 PM
Out of curiosity, what VM program do you use?
I started using the commercial (non-free) VMWare back in 2002 when it was fairly new. It was amazingly stable and ran XP flawlessly under linux; in fact I remember XP behaving better when managed by a VM host! Then I made the mistake of switching to VirtualBox when it was new (2007'ish). Not a pleasant experience: buggy, half my devices didn't work, and VMs were very unportable: to copy a Virtual machine took several very odd steps and was far too complicated compared to VMWare (where you just copy the files...). I came back to VMWare last year, and now keep my license up to date.
I am sure VirtualBox is better nowadays. My mistake was trying it early on and expecting it to be as high quality as a commercial product. Not so. Thank goodness OpenSource is not the only option: good commercial software is truly priceless if it works right! (Sorry, Richard Stallman).


... the price premium to
get enough space for all my VMs and OS installs would have been more than I was
willing to pay. The Hybrid drive is fast enough, and accelerates the OS boot,
which is what I wanted. openSUSE boots really, really fast now :)

I am in the same boat with my work: the data files I play with are simply too large, and that makes buying enough SSD storage impossibly expensive for me. I think I am stuck to platter drives for the next few years, at least until the $-per-GB of SSDs comes down to something reasonable (say, like 20cents per GB).


How well do you like Debian?
I just started using Debain full time in 2011, and am very, very happy with it! I came off of Scientific Linux (fedora based), which is simply an immature distro, and not very well maintained for new and current hardware, and new packages (e.g. gfortran wouldn't even compile my code: when I switched to Debian, gfortran worked perfectly well as it should). The one best thing about Debian is its package management. Synaptic and APT/aptitude are both very forgiving: you can automatically install the package you need without needing to install 40 other updates to other dependent packages! And Debian is about the only distro that you can update completely to a new version without things breaking. E.g. try going from Windows XP straight to Windows 7 and keep all your installed programs, files and links intact!


I am presently trying openSUSE, and it seems to
work quite well, just getting a LiveUSB installer working is all but impossible.
I like being able to try the distro out before installing it into my computer.

I've never used openSUSE , nor Ubuntu. I heard bad stories about Ubuntu trying to replace the X windows system or something with its own "Unity" or something like that, and hackers were not happy. I doubt I'll ever try it, since its popular!


That's also why I now have my /home partition separated from the others.
Ubuntu's default was to have it all together, which annoyed me because it meant
that re-installing LINUX required backing everything up or loosing it, which was
a pain. Now with the /home on a separate partition, I can change distros without
loosing my files. :)

Thats a great idea...hmmm..I think I'll try that! Have always had /home as part of /, and you're right... it would be annoying if one were to be constantly reinstalling linux to try out new distros. I guess I tend to stick to one distro for many years and move on glacially when my sysadmin (a true linux hacker and guru) tries out a new distro on my new laptop. Thats how I got to Debian.


I have heard good things about Debian, just never tried it.

Its the best supported distro out there by the community, bar none. Chances are if you need Linux to do something very specialized, someone has done it already and it has become part of the code for debian.

Zygomorphic
01-02-2013, 12:23 AM
I started using the commercial (non-free) VMWare back in
2002 when it was fairly new. It was amazingly stable and ran XP flawlessly under
linux; in fact I remember XP behaving better when managed by a VM host! Then I
made the mistake of switching to VirtualBox when it was new (2007'ish). Not a
pleasant experience: buggy, half my devices didn't work, and VMs were very
unportable: to copy a Virtual machine took several very odd steps and was far
too complicated compared to VMWare (where you just copy the files...). I came
back to VMWare last year, and now keep my license up to date.
I am sure VirtualBox is better nowadays. My mistake was trying it early on and
expecting it to be as high quality as a commercial product. Not so. Thank
goodness OpenSource is not the only option: good commercial software is truly
priceless if it works right! (Sorry, Richard Stallman).



I am in the same boat with my work: the data files I play with are simply too
large, and that makes buying enough SSD storage impossibly expensive for me. I
think I am stuck to platter drives for the next few years, at least until the
$-per-GB of SSDs comes down to something reasonable (say, like 20cents per GB).


I just started using Debain full time in 2011, and am very, very happy with it!
I came off of Scientific Linux (fedora based), which is simply an immature
distro, and not very well maintained for new and current hardware, and new
packages (e.g. gfortran wouldn't even compile my code: when I switched to
Debian, gfortran worked perfectly well as it should). The one best thing about
Debian is its package management. Synaptic and APT/aptitude are both very
forgiving: you can automatically install the package you need without needing to
install 40 other updates to other dependent packages! And Debian is about the
only distro that you can update completely to a new version without things
breaking. E.g. try going from Windows XP straight to Windows 7 and keep all your
installed programs, files and links intact!



I've never used openSUSE , nor Ubuntu. I heard bad stories about Ubuntu trying
to replace the X windows system or something with its own "Unity" or something
like that, and hackers were not happy. I doubt I'll ever try it, since its
popular!



Thats a great idea...hmmm..I think I'll try that! Have always had /home as part
of /, and you're right... it would be annoying if one were to be constantly
reinstalling linux to try out new distros. I guess I tend to stick to one distro
for many years and move on glacially when my sysadmin (a true linux hacker and
guru) tries out a new distro on my new laptop. Thats how I got to Debian.



Its the best supported distro out there by the community, bar none. Chances are
if you need Linux to do something very specialized, someone has done it already
and it has become part of the code for debian.

Very much true. I am a strong advocate for Free Software, but not some kind of
religious nut (I run the proprietary nVidia drivers). The key issue for me is
that I like LINUX better than Windows, and prefer an OS that is open-source over
one that is sometimes buggy, and always bloated. I have found VirtualBox to be
awesome for my experimental needs, and it is quite good now. On par with VMware,
probably not, but good enough for nerd use. :) It is a little difficult to move
VMs, :(, but I figure that the user polish is probably not as important as being
FLOSS, and the community can help write instructions for it. Also, someone can
come along and edit the source code to improve the user experience quality.

I will definitely give Debian a try, especially since I had an initially good
experience with Ubuntu, and so gained some familiarity with the system. The APT
package-management system is the best, bar none. Synaptics is a great tool for
using APT. :) Actually, OpenSUSE's Yast2 tool is quite powerful as well,
probably on par with Synaptics. It also happens to do other things besides
package-management to make it a more universal OpenSUSE tool.

Yes and no on the Ubuntu with X Server. They are trying to kill it, yes, but the
LINUX community at large seems to endorse the idea of a better replacement for
the X Server. Wayland is Canonical's attempt to do so, and ostensibly it will
have backwards compatibility with the X11 protocol. Unity is Ubuntu's current
interface, which I personally dislike and it has been really, really buggy in
the past. Hence why I switched. That, and the recent news about the phone-home
to Amazon really rubbed me the wrong way.

Once I find a distro that really works, especially when I get my next computer,
I will be setting up a long-term LINUX solution, with the other distros in a VM.
That way, my main system is undamaged, and with virtualization as good as it is
and getting better, I will be able to try out new distros with little
difficulty. :) I already use VMs for most of my distro trials, but having the
/home separate from / is probably just a good idea in practice, as it keeps the
OS separate from the user data. You obviously have more need for long term
support than I do, so your reluctance to change distros makes perfect sense.

Thanks for all the info on Debian, will download tonight and give it a try! :) I
can't blame Debian for Ubuntu's abuse of their system, especially considering
that it is only in the last 2 years that Canonical has turned Ubuntu in the
direction that they have. We need another distro to step up to the plate of
serving the new LINUX converts, one that simply works and works well, with a
minimum of fuss. Power users can mess around in any distro that they like, but
just one that is what Ubuntu was: "LINUX for human beings" would be great for
driving the adoption of LINUX on the home user's desktop.

That is why I created this thread, as a plea to ASUS for a FLOSS computer in
light of Microsoft's move to lock down the PC evironment:
http://rog.asus.com/forum/showthread.php?27334-ASUS-LINUX-Free-BIOS-support