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tkolarik
01-08-2013, 04:33 AM
I have to install Oracle 11g for a class, and even with the G75 and 16GB RAM, running it in Windows XP mode is painfully slow. I would prefer the best 64-bit I can do a "live" install. I will run on a USB stick.

I ran them before on laptops and have a horrible time with the laptop display.

Thanks!

boofsterb
01-08-2013, 05:22 AM
I have to install Oracle 11g for a class, and even with the G75 and 16GB RAM, running it in Windows XP mode is painfully slow. I would prefer the best 64-bit I can do a "live" install. I will run on a USB stick.

I ran them before on laptops and have a horrible time with the laptop display.

Thanks!

If you just want to keep it on a pen drive I'd go with Slax.
Ubuntu, I think, would run best with a full install.

fostert
01-09-2013, 06:13 AM
I have to install Oracle 11g for a class, and even with the G75 and 16GB RAM, running it in Windows XP mode is painfully slow. I would prefer the best 64-bit I can do a "live" install. I will run on a USB stick.

I ran them before on laptops and have a horrible time with the laptop display.

Thanks!

Ever try Knoppix? Its a great live distro, and Klaus Knoppers (the maker, and columnist for Linux magazine) is truly a guru among gurus. Knoppix seems to run all kinds of hardware (as it is based on the very best disto IMHO: Debian), and is really solid.

Zygomorphic
01-09-2013, 11:12 AM
Ever try Knoppix? Its a great live distro, and Klaus Knoppers (the maker, and columnist for Linux magazine) is truly a guru among gurus. Knoppix seems to run all kinds of hardware (as it is based on the very best disto IMHO: Debian), and is really solid.

Sounds like it is worth a try. OpenSUSE has a live distro that seems to work in a VM, but haven't tried it live on the bare metal. I second @fostert's suggestion. Please avoid Ubuntu because of the "phone home" for amazon and the high numbers of bugs.

BrandeX
01-13-2013, 10:53 AM
I have to install Oracle 11g for a class, and even with the G75 and 16GB RAM, running it in Windows XP mode is painfully slow. I would prefer the best 64-bit I can do a "live" install. I will run on a USB stick.

I ran them before on laptops and have a horrible time with the laptop display.

Thanks!
Don't bother, just install it in Windows.

Directions for 11g:
http://blog.mclaughlinsoftware.com/2009/11/27/oracle-11g-on-windows-7/

11g R2:
http://blog.mclaughlinsoftware.com/2011/12/29/oracle-11gr2-on-windows-7/

Quasimodem
01-13-2013, 07:48 PM
Linux Mint installs and finds all drivers no issues...

Zygomorphic
01-13-2013, 08:07 PM
Linux Mint installs and finds all drivers no issues...

Thanks! Will look into that distro out of curiosity, as soon as I figure out why Virtualbox quits loading properly on OpenSUSE after certain updates.

baastrup
01-13-2013, 08:44 PM
Im running windows 7 and Ubuntu 12.10 64bit in a dual boot setup.

The only thing im having problems with in Ubuntu is brightness buttons.(im sure there is a fix).

you can also look at distrowatch.org they give a good overview of what distros there are.

now that Valve's Steam is running on linux there is even more reason to try it out :-)
I hope this will bring more games to linux so I can totally skip M$.

Zygomorphic
01-13-2013, 09:28 PM
Take a look at this thread!
http://rog.asus.com/forum/showthread.php?10749-Linux-drivers-and-atk-for-linux

Quasimodem
01-14-2013, 01:20 AM
Thanks! Will look into that distro out of curiosity, as soon as I figure out why Virtualbox quits loading properly on OpenSUSE after certain updates.

It's based on Ubuntu, just it's more user-friendly... Kind of like a sick of Windows try this distro...

Check out Linux Mint 14 with Cinnamon

I loved it, and would natively run it, but the iwlwifi module has issues with my card and the 5Ghz...

boofsterb
01-14-2013, 05:30 AM
It's based on Ubuntu, just it's more user-friendly... Kind of like a sick of Windows try this distro...

Check out Linux Mint 14 with Cinnamon

I loved it, and would natively run it, but the iwlwifi module has issues with my card and the 5Ghz...

I like Linux mint, I currently have Mint PPC installed on a I-mac G4. I think its the only alternative for a power pc other than leopard.

fostert
01-14-2013, 06:29 AM
I hope this will bring more games to linux so I can totally skip M$.
Yes, this...one day I hope for a microsft-free pc. So far I've let go of everything except Excel. Love it too much.

fostert
01-16-2013, 05:21 AM
Please avoid Ubuntu because of the "phone home" for amazon and the high numbers of bugs.

I did some reading about this tonight, and all I gotta say is "wow". That level of privacy invasion is a new level of desperation for any company to take to drum up revenue; I would expect this sort of breaking of trust by microsoft, but the fact that a linux distro is pioneering this is just disgusting. Linux is about freedom from the monopoly of windows, but ubuntu just wants to be just like big brother bill, and take that freedom away. Sheesh.

I second @Zygo's suggestion: avoid ubuntu.

Zygomorphic
01-16-2013, 11:11 AM
I did some reading about this tonight, and all I gotta say is "wow". That level of privacy invasion is a new level of desperation for any company to take to drum up revenue; I would expect this sort of breaking of trust by microsoft, but the fact that a linux distro is pioneering this is just disgusting. Linux is about freedom from the monopoly of windows, but ubuntu just wants to be just like big brother bill, and take that freedom away. Sheesh.

I second @Zygo's suggestion: avoid ubuntu.

Correction...they want to be like A****. Said company is worse than MS, and is trying to take over every portion of technology and enslave users to the almighty "keeping up with the jobses..." :D

fostert
01-18-2013, 01:07 AM
Yeah; I try to keep all a**le software **OFF** my wife's N53SN, because once its on there it infects the win7 registry to such an extent that getting it totally uninstalled is impossible. A manual search of the registry (using regedit) after removing itunes revealled hundreds of keys with variant of itunes, ipod,iphone, and other ithings, as well as a**le. Its vermin-ware, perfect for the non-secure OS like windows, where it can get into every corner and hide.

boofsterb
01-18-2013, 02:14 AM
If you are looking for an OS where you choose what it offers look into slackware

Zygomorphic
01-18-2013, 02:53 AM
If you are looking for an OS where you choose what it offers look into slackware

Interesting, never tried that distro before. Debian would be another distro where you can add a lot of packages. Maybe not to the same level of customization as slackware, but the package management system is amazing, as @fostert can tell you.

fostert
01-19-2013, 08:06 PM
If you are looking for an OS where you choose what it offers look into slackware
My very first linux distro back in 1995 was Slackware 3.0, with the barely-out-of-beta Linux kernel 1.2.13. It was the only one for sale in my local computer shop on a CD ($5), but I needed linux to run some unix software that had just been ported. This was before the days of redhat, ubuntu, mandrake, etc....all the big-box distros had yet to come out. Slack was great but you to live close to the hardware: if you had hardware that wasn't recognized, you recompiled the kernel to try and add that support (there were no insertable kernel modules then), or you wrote the device driver yourself. Today of course its alot less primitive because the community is thousands of times larger, but slack really still is a hacker's distro - not something to recommend to the linux newcomer.

Zygomorphic
01-20-2013, 01:48 AM
@fostert, I may add slackware to my list of distros to play with in a VM.

boofsterb
01-20-2013, 02:34 AM
My very first linux distro back in 1995 was Slackware 3.0, with the barely-out-of-beta Linux kernel 1.2.13. It was the only one for sale in my local computer shop on a CD ($5), but I needed linux to run some unix software that had just been ported. This was before the days of redhat, ubuntu, mandrake, etc....all the big-box distros had yet to come out. Slack was great but you to live close to the hardware: if you had hardware that wasn't recognized, you recompiled the kernel to try and add that support (there were no insertable kernel modules then), or you wrote the device driver yourself. Today of course its alot less primitive because the community is thousands of times larger, but slack really still is a hacker's distro - not something to recommend to the linux newcomer.

I'm not trying to be rude but I'm not new to the Linux community. I would say slackware is more of a utilitarian type of distro where as for Pentesting (Hacking) I would say Backtrack is more that flavor.

rewben
01-20-2013, 03:05 PM
slackware is still my personal favorite. i remembered the time when i got a 100mhz cyrix cpu (!) and 16mb ram (!!), and slackware was the only distro that let me installed on that without complaining; then i ran apache, mysql, bind, qmail, grsec, plus other things on it. i don't know about you, but i can feel the greatness of linux in slackware; never complained, and everything just worked.

i love those days :) (redhat complained that my ram was too small; it demanded 64mb before i could proceed :/ )

fostert
01-20-2013, 06:46 PM
@boofsterb: No rudeness detected or meant, my friend. :) ...always great to chat up another linux guru on these forums. Your mention of slackware just brought up alot of memories of my first dayz of "unix on the pc". On the bleeding edge, compiling every new little kernel release (took hours on my pentium 60, but the performance completely destroyed the Sun sparcstations at university), spending hours getting the modem working, etc...

I guess I would say instead that every distro in those days were all hacker's dreams at that time, and slack was the best of them. But the word utilitarian is quite perfect to describe it today: no frills, no sugar-coats, nothing hidden, and live close to the hardware!

Was slack your first distro? I wonder how it would run on a G74/G75/G5X?

Zygomorphic
01-20-2013, 08:07 PM
@boofsterb: No rudeness detected or meant, my friend. :) ...always great to chat up another linux guru on these forums. Your mention of slackware just brought up alot of memories of my first dayz of "unix on the pc". On the bleeding edge, compiling every new little kernel release (took hours on my pentium 60, but the performance completely destroyed the Sun sparcstations at university), spending hours getting the modem working, etc...

I guess I would say instead that every distro in those days were all hacker's dreams at that time, and slack was the best of them. But the word utilitarian is quite perfect to describe it today: no frills, no sugar-coats, nothing hidden, and live close to the hardware!

Was slack your first distro? I wonder how it would run on a G74?

Try it and let us know! :) From what I've heard of the LINUX world in the 1990's, it was all targeted at nerds back then. Nobody was worried about non-techie users on LINUX. If you can't risk your machine, I can download it and try it on a G53SX, if you would like.

boofsterb
01-20-2013, 09:49 PM
slackware was definitely my first but I have used many different flavors of Linux since then. slackware is totally customizable to the point where I had to write my own script just to connect my Bluetooth headphones. That's what I like about the Linux community there is tremendous support. I would not know as much as I do with Linux if it wasn't for the community chiming in.

fostert
01-21-2013, 01:37 AM
Wow...lots of slack users! I'm in good company here! I stayed with slackware to kernel 2.0 and later but in 1999 I fried my Pentium 60 and everything in it (I touched my CRT screen and the electrostatic discharge travelled through my body into my metal desk, and into the case which was in contact with the desk, and snap!). Went to redhat (didn't like it), to Mandrake (hated that), then to Scientific Linux (was OK but horribly undersupported) and recently (2011) to Debian.

@Zygo: Thats terrific, and I may actually give slackware 14.0 a try on the G74 later this year when my leave ends. For now I need my G74 functioning and well-tuned, the way I have it with Debian.
1990s nerds, and comp-sci majors, grewn up and became today's IT professionals. The proliferation of linux was inevitable.

@rewben: sounds like you too started in the days of the early 1.X kernel releases too. Cyrix 100MHz? Barely remember those chips.

@boofsterb: yes, the community is the greatest thing about it. Spectacular, just like the ROG community on these forums.

Zygomorphic
01-21-2013, 01:55 AM
Looking forward to your testing when your leave ends, @fostert! :) Or would you like me to go ahead and give it a try. Say the word and I start the download!

Let me echo your sentiments. I love the community that has arisen around the LINUX world, much like the community here. Maybe one of us should start the LINUX usergroup to promote the penguin! :D Anyway, back to LINUX. The community is so helpful, in that there are those nerds out there who are free with their knowledge and ready to help. They are the tech support of the LINUX world, and they pretty much cost nothing.

I tried Fedora, didn't care for it much, I have CentOS running in a VM in VirtualBox, and like it well enough, but not as well as OpenSUSE. The make or break for me is the package management. Debian's package management (namely Synaptic) is incredible, and OpenSUSE's (with YaST) is very close behind. It makes all the difference in the world of 20000+ packages to have a good maintenance program to keep all the dependencies resolved and cleaned up when uninstalled. That's why I'm looking forward to a true LINUX smartphone, one that actually acts like a real computer, rather than a stripped-down, limited version of LINUX.

boofsterb
01-21-2013, 02:16 AM
@Zygo...Greetings and salutations fellow Pengu, the last interesting thing I saw from Linux was there smartphone, here's the link to it.

http://www.ubuntu.com/devices/phone

Zygomorphic
01-21-2013, 02:20 AM
@Zygo...Greetings and salutations fellow Pengu, the last interesting thing I saw from Linux was there smartphone, here's the link to it.

http://www.ubuntu.com/devices/phone

Greetings, fellow pingus. I have heard of the Ubuntu phone, and am waiting to see how it turns out. It could be a real winner, especially if the userland supports both LINUX and Android apps. That would open up a whole new world of smartphone productivity, since the device would be really capable of editing office documents and working like a full-fledged computer. Granted, typing on even a physical smartphone keyboard is pretty disappointing, but it would be miles better than the present stage of smartphones.

Zygomorphic
01-21-2013, 02:33 AM
I now have a group for the LINUX users out there.
http://rog.asus.com/forum/group.php?groupid=23

Myk SilentShadow
01-21-2013, 02:39 AM
I now have a group for the LINUX users out there.
http://rog.asus.com/forum/group.php?groupid=23

1st joining member!!! now what prize did I win? :p

Zygomorphic
01-21-2013, 03:03 AM
1st joining member!!! now what prize did I win? :p

What LINUX distro would you like to have the group info page link to? That, and a cheap iphone, whenever the next batch of spammers come along. :D

rewben
01-21-2013, 03:06 AM
Wow...lots of slack users! I'm in good company here! I stayed with slackware to kernel 2.0 and later but in 1999 I fried my Pentium 60 and everything in it (I touched my CRT screen and the electrostatic discharge travelled through my body into my metal desk, and into the case which was in contact with the desk, and snap!). Went to redhat (didn't like it), to Mandrake (hated that), then to Scientific Linux (was OK but horribly undersupported) and recently (2011) to Debian.

@Zygo: Thats terrific, and I may actually give slackware 14.0 a try on the G74 later this year when my leave ends. For now I need my G74 functioning and well-tuned, the way I have it with Debian.
1990s nerds, and comp-sci majors, grewn up and became today's IT professionals. The proliferation of linux was inevitable.

@rewben: sounds like you too started in the days of the early 1.X kernel releases too. Cyrix 100MHz? Barely remember those chips.

@boofsterb: yes, the community is the greatest thing about it. Spectacular, just like the ROG community on these forums.

@fostert, no, i was way behind you :), started my linux journey at 2.0. before that i run freebsd.


Looking forward to your testing when your leave ends, @fostert! :) Or would you like me to go ahead and give it a try. Say the word and I start the download!

Let me echo your sentiments. I love the community that has arisen around the LINUX world, much like the community here. Maybe one of us should start the LINUX usergroup to promote the penguin! :D Anyway, back to LINUX. The community is so helpful, in that there are those nerds out there who are free with their knowledge and ready to help. They are the tech support of the LINUX world, and they pretty much cost nothing.

I tried Fedora, didn't care for it much, I have CentOS running in a VM in VirtualBox, and like it well enough, but not as well as OpenSUSE. The make or break for me is the package management. Debian's package management (namely Synaptic) is incredible, and OpenSUSE's (with YaST) is very close behind. It makes all the difference in the world of 20000+ packages to have a good maintenance program to keep all the dependencies resolved and cleaned up when uninstalled. That's why I'm looking forward to a true LINUX smartphone, one that actually acts like a real computer, rather than a stripped-down, limited version of LINUX.

to be frank i am not good at linux desktops; i am used to console; so every distro is almost the same to me. in terms of server management, i still prefer minimal install, with the least number of packages as base, then i customize and compile the services one by one to make things work. for work purposes, i am stuck with redhat. however, another beauty of linux distros that saves me a lot of headache is this: you can always find the solution from one distro and port it to another. once you know how, it become painless :)


@Zygo...Greetings and salutations fellow Pengu, the last interesting thing I saw from Linux was there smartphone, here's the link to it.

http://www.ubuntu.com/devices/phone


Greetings, fellow pingus. I have heard of the Ubuntu phone, and am waiting to see how it turns out. It could be a real winner, especially if the userland supports both LINUX and Android apps. That would open up a whole new world of smartphone productivity, since the device would be really capable of editing office documents and working like a full-fledged computer. Granted, typing on even a physical smartphone keyboard is pretty disappointing, but it would be miles better than the present stage of smartphones.

basically the common smart phones that we have today are unix-like environment in the background (i jailbroke my iphone so that i can use ssh lol)

Myk SilentShadow
01-21-2013, 03:16 AM
What LINUX distro would you like to have the group info page link to? That, and a cheap iphone, whenever the next batch of spammers come along. :D

lmao nice one...and i'd make a suggestion, but eh, probably best to put up more than one...don't want people thinking we're one sided or anything...we're not M$ here :p

boofsterb
01-21-2013, 03:31 AM
My Droid X and Droid RZR are jail broke with ssh and samba. also use an imac a neighbor gave me to serve as LAMP server for my mediatomb and dyndns website. love linux

Zygomorphic
01-21-2013, 11:12 AM
lmao nice one...and i'd make a suggestion, but eh, probably best to put up more than one...don't want people thinking we're one sided or anything...we're not M$ here :p

Throw out some suggestions! I'll add them! :)

Myk SilentShadow
01-21-2013, 12:13 PM
Throw out some suggestions! I'll add them! :)

OpenSUSE, Fedora, Debian, Slackware...they're the only ones I know of lol

rewben
01-21-2013, 12:18 PM
linux mint, centos, gentoo; maybe we should find out which one is the most ROG friendly :D

Zygomorphic
01-21-2013, 08:16 PM
linux mint, centos, gentoo; maybe we should find out which one is the most ROG friendly :D

That sounds like the best idea. Figure out which LINUX distros (live and otherwise) work on which ROG hardware. That way, we can encourage ASUS to start officially supporting LINUX! :)

Myk SilentShadow
01-21-2013, 08:31 PM
That sounds like the best idea. Figure out which LINUX distros (live and otherwise) work on which ROG hardware. That way, we can encourage ASUS to start officially supporting LINUX! :)

Well, besides a minor annoyance when I went to actually install SUSE 12.2. I went to install it when I was really tired, so I aborted the install and got back to it a day or so later....the screen went all crazy on me, until I changed the display mode from 1600x900(my screen's native res) to "default". Got it installed though, now I just need to dive into this new look Linux lol

Zygomorphic
01-21-2013, 09:01 PM
Well, besides a minor annoyance when I went to actually install SUSE 12.2. I went to install it when I was really tired, so I aborted the install and got back to it a day or so later....the screen went all crazy on me, until I changed the display mode from 1600x900(my screen's native res) to "default". Got it installed though, now I just need to dive into this new look Linux lol

The nVidia drivers help, if that is what you have.

fostert
01-22-2013, 06:18 AM
OpenSUSE, Fedora, Debian, Slackware...they're the only ones I know of lol

Debian for me is the only one I've tested on ROG hardware. I used Scientific Linux (an RHEL based distro created by particle physicists at Fermilab and CERN) for 6 years before that. Second best to Debian; more bugs, less hardware support, much more difficult rpm-based package management. But stable, really, really stable.

With all this talk about slackware I'm really, really curious to try it on the G74, but @Zygo: you can beat me to it if you like!I'd love to hear how it runs on G53 hardware "out of the box".

Zygomorphic
01-22-2013, 11:19 AM
Debian for me is the only one I've tested on ROG hardware. I used Scientific Linux (an RHEL based distro created by particle physicists at Fermilab and CERN) for 6 years before that. Second best to Debian; more bugs, less hardware support, much more difficult rpm-based package management. But stable, really, really stable.

With all this talk about slackware I'm really, really curious to try it on the G74, but @Zygo: you can beat me to it if you like!I'd love to hear how it runs on G53 hardware "out of the box".

Will download and install today! :)

OpenSUSE uses RPM package management, and with YaST, I've found it to be really good. But then again, that could just be YaST.

Quasimodem
01-23-2013, 05:29 AM
Just ran Linux Mint 14 from the disc to run some wireless tests again. I an have Intel 6300 WiFi card so my testing of the 5Ghz network is irrelevant, but i would like to report it detected all hardware no problems, including my 1TB RAID-0... I'll probably switch back tomorrow when I have some time, and can report further.

fostert
01-23-2013, 05:43 AM
Do you mean Slackware 14? Or another distro with version #14? Sorry...when people refer to Linux version numbers, I immediately think kernels...

Glad to hear it found your RAID...now thats impressive!

BTW, anyone here using linux with trim support of their SSD in a G-series lappy? My next upgrade is going to be an SSD, and I've never had experience with Linux and TRIM....

Quasimodem
01-23-2013, 06:17 AM
Do you mean Slackware 14? Or another distro with version #14? Sorry...when people refer to Linux version numbers, I immediately think kernels...

Glad to hear it found your RAID...now thats impressive!

BTW, anyone here using linux with trim support of their SSD in a G-series lappy? My next upgrade is going to be an SSD, and I've never had experience with Linux and TRIM....

I guess I omitted the most important part without thinking... Sorry, Linux Mint 14...

Zygomorphic
01-23-2013, 11:20 AM
Slackware running in VirtualBox! :) Seems to work OK, though I will need to play with it more and see if there is a live CD version that I can try on the bare-metal hardware of my G53SX without installing and wiping out my LINUX partition.

fostert
01-25-2013, 06:44 AM
Slackware running in VirtualBox! :) Seems to work OK, though I will need to play with it more and see if there is a live CD version that I can try on the bare-metal hardware of my G53SX without installing and wiping out my LINUX partition.
Thats really good news @Zygo! Seems like slack has come a long ways since the version I grew up with (which would find maybe 2/3 of your hardware; the rest you had to find in the kernel tree and recompile the kernel). Looking forward to hearing if slack can happily run all the G53 hardware you have. Can't wait to be able to try it soon someday on my G74....feels like going home in a way!

Zygomorphic
01-25-2013, 11:23 AM
Know of any slack-derived live distros? Those would be the easiest for me to try. If not, I'll head to the greatest treasure trove of knowledge (Wikipedia :cool:) and find one.

Myk SilentShadow
01-25-2013, 12:36 PM
Wanna hear something funny? I bought an Aussie PC Mag just yesterday and on the front cover DVD...the full version of Linux Mint 14 lol.

If I have serious troubles with the latest Nvidia, I think I may download Slackware and give it a go myself.

boofsterb
01-25-2013, 04:11 PM
Know of any slack-derived live distros? Those would be the easiest for me to try. If not, I'll head to the greatest treasure trove of knowledge (Wikipedia :cool:) and find one.

I believe Slax is a slackware derived distro that is made to be a live OS (Pendrive).

Zygomorphic
01-26-2013, 12:21 AM
I believe Slax is a slackware derived distro that is made to be a live OS (Pendrive).

Will try and see how it works! :)

Zygomorphic
01-27-2013, 02:35 AM
Downloaded Slax 7.0 and ran it in live mode...Posting screenshots to show how little RAM it is using with KDE4. Sorry, @fostert, but this is pretty good RAM utilization with Firefox open (to the ROG homepage, of course ;)).
Fresh boot in live mode:
16385
Firefox open with two tabs:
16386
Firefox closed:
16387

Colonel Panic
01-27-2013, 05:34 AM
Know of any slack-derived live distros? Those would be the easiest for me to try. If not, I'll head to the greatest treasure trove of knowledge (Wikipedia :cool:) and find one.

According to DistroWatch (http://distrowatch.com/search.php?basedon=Slackware) the following 20 active distros are based on Slackware.

1. Slackware Linux (11)
The Official Release of Slackware Linux by Patrick Volkerding is an advanced Linux operating system, designed with the twin goals of ease of use and stability as top priorities. Including the latest popular software while retaining a sense of tradition, providing simplicity and ease of use alongside flexibility and power, Slackware brings the best of all worlds to the table. Originally developed by Linus Torvalds in 1991, the UNIX-like Linux operating system now benefits from the contributions of millions of users and developers around the world. Slackware Linux provides new and experienced users alike with a fully-featured system, equipped to serve in any capacity from desktop workstation to machine-room server. Web, ftp, and email servers are ready to go out of the box, as are a wide selection of popular desktop environments. A full range of development tools, editors, and current libraries is included for users who wish to develop or compile additional software.

2. Slax (29)
Slax is a Slackware-based bootable CD containing a Linux operating system, designed with a modular approach. Despite its small size, Slax provides a wide collection of pre-installed software for daily use, including a well-organised graphical user interface and useful recovery tools for system administrators.

3. VectorLinux (49)
VectorLinux is a small, fast, Intel based Linux operating system for PC style computers. The creators of VectorLinux had a single credo: keep it simple, keep it small and let the end user decide what their operating system is going to be. What has evolved from this concept is perhaps the best little Linux operating system available anywhere. For the casual computer user there is a lightening-fast desktop with graphical programs to handle daily activities from web surfing, sending and receiving email, chatting on IRC to running an FTP server. The power user will be pleased because all the tools are there to compile programs, use the system as a server or perhaps the gateway for home or office computer network. Administrators will be equally pleased because of the small size and memory requirements, so the operating system can be deployed on older machines that have long been forgotten.

4. Salix OS (51)
Salix OS is a Slackware-based Linux distribution that is simple, fast, easy to use and compatible with Slackware Linux. Optimised for desktop use, Salix OS features one application per task, custom package repositories, advanced package management with dependency support, localised system administration tools and innovative artwork.

5. Zenwalk Linux (50)
Zenwalk Linux (formerly Minislack) is a Slackware-based GNU/Linux operating system with a goal of being slim and fast by using only one application per task and with focus on graphical desktop and multimedia usage. Zenwalk features the latest Linux technology along with a complete programming environment and libraries to provide an ideal platform for application programmers. Zenwalk's modular approach also provides a simple way to convert Zenwalk Linux into a finely-tuned modern server (e.g. LAMP, messaging, file sharing).

6. Absolute Linux (55)
Absolute Linux is a light-weight modification of Slackware Linux. It includes several utilities that make configuration and maintenance easier and it has many common desktop and Internet applications installed and configured with tight integration of menus, applications and MIME types. Absolute Linux uses IceWM and ROX for its window and file managers.

7. Slackel (70)
Slackel is a Linux distribution and live CD based on Slackware Linux and Salix OS. It is fully compatible with both. It uses the current version of Slackware and the latest version of the KDE desktop. The Slackel disc images are offered in two different forms - installation and live.

8. Porteus (90)
Porteus is a fast, portable and modular live CD/USB medium based on Slackware Linux. The distribution started as a community remix of Slax, another Slackware-based live CD, with KDE 3 as the default desktop for the i486 edition and a stripped-down KDE 4 as the desktop environment for the x86_64 flavour. The lightweight LXDE is available as an alternative desktop environment.

9. Superb Mini Server (137)
Superb Mini Server (SMS) is a Slackware-based server distribution with web, DNS, DHCP, file, print and fax servers, iptables firewall, mail server with spam filter and anti-virus scanner, and BitTorrent station. It also includes Webmin, a web-based administration tool, but no graphical desktop. SMS, which comes with Slackware's text-mode system installer, is built using Linux-Live scripts (from Slax) and can be used as a live CD for testing purposes.

10. Wifislax (140)
Wifislax is a Slackware-based live CD containing a variety of security and forensics tools. The distribution's main claim to fame is the integration of various unofficial network drivers into the Linux kernel, thus providing out-of-the-box support for a large number of wired and wireless network cards.

11. AUSTRUMI (160)
AUSTRUMI (Austrum Latvijas Linukss) is a bootable live Linux distribution based on Slackware Linux. It requires limited system resources and can run on any Intel-compatible system with a CD-ROM installed. The entire operating system and all of the applications run from RAM, making AUSTRUMI a fast system and allowing the boot medium to be removed after the operating system starts.

12. Imagineos (188)
Imagineos (formerly GoblinX) is a bootable live CD distribution based on Slackware Linux. The primary goal for Imagineos is to create a more pleasant and functional desktop, standardising all icons and themes to make it easy for novice users to learn about available applications.

13. Draco GNU/Linux (197)
Draco GNU/Linux is a distribution based on Slackware Linux and pkgsrc, a package management system developed by NetBSD. It is distributed in the form of a minimal base system, but a range of additional software packages is available for installation from the project's FTP server.

14. CDlinux (203)
CDlinux is a compact Linux mini-distribution. It ships with an up-to-date version of the Linux kernel, X.Org, Xfce window manager, and many popular applications. It has good internationalisation and locale support, and is highly user-configurable.

15. RIPLinuX (220)
Recovery Is Possible (RIP) is a Slackware-based CD or floppy boot/rescue/backup/maintenance system. It has support for a lot of filesystem types (Reiserfs, Reiser4, ext2/3, iso9660, UDF, XFS, JFS, UFS, HPFS, HFS, MINIX, MS DOS, NTFS, and VFAT) and contains a bunch of utilities for system recovery. It also has IDE/SCSI/SATA, PCMCIA, RAID, LVM2, and Ethernet/DSL/cable/PPP/PPPOE network support.

16. Linvo GNU/Linux (242)
Linvo GNU/Linux is a Slackware-based distribution and live CD/DVD. Some of its more interesting features include a careful selection of applications for every-day use, installable to hard disk from the live medium, use of software modules for extensive customisation of the live CD, availability of the GNOME desktop, applications installed and managed on a per-user basis, and out-of-the-box support for most multimedia formats.

17. Kongoni GNU/Linux (252)
Kongoni GNU/Linux is a Slackware-based, desktop-oriented GNU/Linux distribution and live CD. Its main features include a graphical installer, a Kongoni Integrated Setup System (KISS), and an easy-to-use Ports Installation GUI (PIG). The distribution's package management borrows its main concepts from BSD ports, with an intuitive graphical package installer that compiles and installs programs from source code on the user's system.

18. JoLinux (272)
JoLinux is a Brazilian desktop Linux distribution for x86_64 platforms based on Slackware Linux.

19. Plamo Linux (299)
Plamo Linux is a Japanese Linux distribution based on Slackware Linux. The installer, and many text-based and graphical tools have been updated to include Japanese language support.

20. pQui Linux (309)
pQui Linux is a Brazilian desktop-oriented distribution based on Slackware Linux.

boofsterb
01-27-2013, 05:53 AM
Downloaded Slax 7.0 and ran it in live mode...Posting screenshots to show how little RAM it is using with KDE4. Sorry, @fostert, but this is pretty good RAM utilization with Firefox open (to the ROG homepage, of course ;)).
Fresh boot in live mode:
16385
Firefox open with two tabs:
16386
Firefox closed:
16387

Look's pretty good. I also like the fact that there's many modules to choose from.

Zygomorphic
01-27-2013, 11:23 AM
Look's pretty good. I also like the fact that there's many modules to choose from.

Yup! :) Now to create a bootable USB key and see if I get that little RAM usage on my main machine...

boofsterb
01-27-2013, 04:11 PM
Yup! :) Now to create a bootable USB key and see if I get that little RAM usage on my main machine...

I use Slax distro on a old asus eee 701. I swear it's the smallest laptop i've ever owned. Slax works perfectly with the atom processor and 2GB ram that the little eee offers.

fostert
01-27-2013, 05:54 PM
Downloaded Slax 7.0 and ran it in live mode...Posting screenshots to show how little RAM it is using with KDE4. Sorry, @fostert, but this is pretty good RAM utilization with Firefox open (to the ROG homepage, of course ;)).

Wow...don't be sorry, thats terrific actually. I am admittedly befuddled; X+TWM uses 232 MB, but that should be *much* less than any desktop manager like KDE. Which version of KDE is that? (3.X? 4.0?)

I am curious...could you boot slax fresh, opena terminal, type

sync && echo 3 > /proc/sys/vm/drop_caches

as root (to clear the RAM caching) and then report how much RAM X+KDE are using (say, with "top")? Thats how I check my RAM usage...I'd like to compare apples to apples, so to speak! Thanks!

boofsterb
01-27-2013, 06:56 PM
Top and MC (midnight commander) are both really cool terminal apps. I choose to use terminal apps on linux overall like when i browse kat.ph and download torrent files i'll use lynx and rtorrent

fostert
01-27-2013, 07:27 PM
Top and MC (midnight commander) are both really cool terminal apps. I choose to use terminal apps on linux overall like when i browse kat.ph and download torrent files i'll use lynx and rtorrent

Yes, for sure; MC is a fantastic text-based file manager. Been around for a long time too (it was included in the early 90's distros yggdrasil (now gone) and slackware).

If you like top, try htop, which is like top on steroids; a much more informative terminal based process monitor.

My all time terminal fave is jstar, which is a text editor from the Joe's Own Editor package. Its a nice blend of emacs and the old word-processing program wordstar. Have used it for 18 years now of using linux. Wrote my thesis in it, code in it all the time, and use it to write my papers in LaTex.

boofsterb
01-27-2013, 07:34 PM
My all time terminal fave is jstar, which is a text editor from the Joe's Own Editor package. Its a nice blend of emacs and the old word-processing program wordstar. Have used it for 18 years now of using linux. Wrote my thesis in it, code in it all the time, and use it to write my papers in LaTex.

I'll have to try jstar. I've always used vi for text editing.

Zygomorphic
01-27-2013, 07:38 PM
I use Slax distro on a old asus eee 701. I swear it's the smallest laptop i've ever owned. Slax works perfectly with the atom processor and 2GB ram that the little eee offers.

I only have 8x the RAM and 7x the CPU in my laptop...lol :p

@fostert, I will try booting the VM a little later and report back my findings. You say you want those commands executed on a fresh boot-up?

Yes, it is KDE4, that's what this article says:
http://www.slax.org/blog/19139-Slax-7-release-candidate-1.html

fostert
01-27-2013, 07:45 PM
Wow, vi is hardcore! You're a true unix soldier....never picked up vi; they gave us a command sheet for vi on the first day in university, but thats gone now...today I only know how to open, edit and close a file in it...thats it!

Zygomorphic
01-27-2013, 08:07 PM
I've used vim...trying to learn it better so that I can do more at the command line. All I know how to do is open, edit, save, close, and syntax highlight a file. :)

Zygomorphic
01-27-2013, 08:16 PM
@fostert, here are the the results! :)
16417

fostert
01-28-2013, 01:08 AM
Ah, OK...325 MB is really, really good considering you're running a substantial desktop manager like KDE. In fact thats about as lean as one can get on a stock kernel! Fantastic.

Here is a screenshot of a shell running in TWM after a fresh clearing of the RAM cache:
16434

241 MB: thats as low as I can get with TWM on my stock 3.2.0-2 kernel, but it isn't all that different from your value considering KDE is so much more well developed. I actually may go back to xfce or fluxbox tomorrow at work!

Zygomorphic
01-28-2013, 01:39 AM
That is pretty good. Now to try on my bare-metal machine and see how I can do! :) Competitive memory-freeing! :D

Tried it, I get down to around 350 MB on the bare-metal with TWM.
I get 1.2 GB on KDE.

boofsterb
01-28-2013, 04:07 AM
I get 1.2 GB on KDE.

Thats better than Vista.:)LOL

quaid
01-28-2013, 10:55 AM
BTW, anyone here using linux with trim support of their SSD in a G-series lappy? My next upgrade is going to be an SSD, and I've never had experience with Linux and TRIM....

i am a newer Linux user but I am running an SSD on both my g74sx and my desktop. I am using Linuxmint 14 on both. This distro has good support for all of my hardware except my desktop's asus xonar dx soundcard (weirdly).



See if your SSD supports TRIM (most modern SSD's do, IME)

for h in /dev/sd?; do if [ `sudo hdparm -I $h | grep TRIM | wc -l` != 0 ]; then sudo hdparm -I $h | egrep "/dev/|Model"; fi; done
If this code results in your SSD being listed then it supposedly supports TRIM.


To enable TRIM support (and some other SSD improvements) I edited /etc/fstab file with root or superuser access:

added

none /tmp tmpfs nodev,nosuid,mode=1777 0 0
to save temp files in memory

amended

UUID=0c4de1f6-b77b-49d7-bccf-63c4268e8f43 / ext4 errors=remount-ro 0 1
such that

errors=remount-ro
becomes

errors=remount-ro,noatime
to disable writing to disk each time a file is read, or add discard to that for TRIM

errors=remount-ro,noatime,discard
NOTE that ext2 does not support the discard command, and I used ext2 for my boot partition but ext4 for my root and home partitions. I enabled discard for each ext4 partition, but noatime for all.

There are lots of other little tweaks that can be done to purportedly improve the SSD experience on Linux, as well as lots of debate about them on the forums. Some people even recommend against TRIM(?!). The guide I followed is here:

http://forum.linuxmint.com/viewtopic.php?f=90&t=79503
But many others exist:

https://wiki.archlinux.org/index.php/Solid_State_Drives
http://www.debian.org/doc/manuals/debian-reference/ch09.en.html#_optimization_of_solid_state_drive
http://goinglinux.com/articles/Optimize_Linux_For_SSD_Drive.html
https://sites.google.com/site/easylinuxtipsproject/ssd
http://community.linuxmint.com/tutorial/view/293

PS - at the end of my 1 year ASUS warranty and I just spilled tea on my g74sx. Result = stuck left mouse button. Frack.

Zygomorphic
01-28-2013, 11:16 AM
Thats better than Vista.:)LOL

Sadly, yes it is. I wonder what is using up that much RAM. :confused:

tkolarik
01-28-2013, 08:57 PM
I cannot get a 64-bit linux live version to boot. I tired the LiveLiinux USB and the 32-bit will boot but not 64-bit.

Any suggestions? I would like to be able to store data and files so running off of a USB live installation would be prefered.

ty

Myk SilentShadow
01-28-2013, 09:05 PM
I cannot get a 64-bit linux live version to boot. I tired the LiveLiinux USB and the 32-bit will boot but not 64-bit.

Any suggestions? I would like to be able to store data and files so running off of a USB live installation would be prefered.

ty

What's your hardware?

Zygomorphic
01-28-2013, 10:59 PM
What's your hardware?

Which LINUX distro are you using?

tkolarik
01-29-2013, 04:13 AM
I have the G75VW-BBK5 with an Intel 520 SSD as boot abd the original 1TB as data. I did add 8GB of Patriot RAM.

I tried Mint and Knoppix and some others. Mainly the 32-bit would install, albiet slowly (live usb) but the 64-bit versions just froze upon boot.

I'll try again tonight and get more info.

Myk SilentShadow
01-29-2013, 04:15 AM
I don't know about Mint and Knoppix, but Slax has a really good live version of Linux and I hear the live version for OpenSUSE is pretty good too, give those a go if and when you can :)

Zygomorphic
01-29-2013, 11:16 AM
What are your BIOS settings? Those can affect boot on the newer systems.

Live version of Slax works great in a VM, but it isn't meant as a long-term system, though with configuration you could make it into that. It is designed as a rescue distro to recover stuff when your main OS won't boot.

Debian Live has persistence, I believe, and I know that Slax does. It detects whether or not you are booting from writable media and makes the ability to store data if necessary.

Do you really want Live, or do you simply want to install LINUX? If you want to install LINUX directly, make free space on the end of a partition and go with a non-live installer (Such as the one for OpenSUSE).

fostert
01-30-2013, 06:00 AM
i am a newer Linux user but I am running an SSD on both my g74sx and my desktop. I am using Linuxmint 14 on both. This distro has good support for all of my hardware except my desktop's asus xonar dx soundcard (weirdly).
...
...
PS - at the end of my 1 year ASUS warranty and I just spilled tea on my g74sx. Result = stuck left mouse button. Frack.

This is terrific info @quaid; thank you!! I have bookmarked this thread and those links of yours, and will return to them if/when I get an ssd to put in my g74!!

Sorry about the tea. I had an accident with my lappy today; was walking down to my pickup point for work (I go in with two ther guys), and stepped on a patch of clear solid black ice. Feet went up in the air, and landed, yes, on my G74 in my backpack! Ouch. The plastic screen frame came out on one side, but it snapped back into place with some pressure, but there is now a clicking sound when I tilt my laptop around, like a small piece is now tinkling around inside. But, everything works 100% fine; ran the hell out of it today, and so far I notice no unusual behavior. Screen is still tightly hinged as it always was.

Gotta hand it to ASUS; its a solid machine!

Myk SilentShadow
01-30-2013, 06:11 AM
This is terrific info @quaid; thank you!! I have bookmarked this thread and those links of yours, and will return to them if/when I get an ssd to put in my g74!!

Sorry about the tea. I had an accident with my lappy today; was walking down to my pickup point for work (I go in with two ther guys), and stepped on a patch of clear solid black ice. Feet went up in the air, and landed, yes, on my G74 in my backpack! Ouch. The plastic screen frame came out on one side, but it snapped back into place with some pressure, but there is now a clicking sound when I tilt my laptop around, like a small piece is now tinkling around inside. But, everything works 100% fine; ran the hell out of it today, and so far I notice no unusual behavior. Screen is still tightly hinged as it always was.

Gotta hand it to ASUS; its a solid machine!

eh to hell with the laptop, how's your back? the impact woulda been pretty bad...by the way, LOVE your Avatar Pic :D

fostert
01-30-2013, 06:22 AM
eh to hell with the laptop, how's your back? the impact woulda been pretty bad...by the way, LOVE your Avatar Pic :D

Back? ...never thought about that...had me wife walk on it tonight, and its right as rain! She said theres an ASUS ROG imprint on it though... ;)

Thanks! Always on the lookout for ways to insult windows...

Myk SilentShadow
01-30-2013, 06:59 AM
HAHA if that's so you should take a pic and show us your dedication to Rog lmao!! :p :cool: and can understand that mate, been thinking of creating myself a new Avatar and pushing out some Linux related Wallpapers and been contemplating doing some Linux/RoG Icons...perhaps a theme pack if and when I can find the time

Zygomorphic
01-30-2013, 11:18 AM
Back? ...never thought about that...had me wife walk on it tonight, and its right as rain! She said theres an ASUS ROG imprint on it though... ;)

Thanks! Always on the lookout for ways to insult windows...

Love the avatar and I hope your back is better! :) The computer can be replaced, the back not so much. Unlike ASUS, God didn't give an accidental damage warranty on body parts. :( :D

Myk SilentShadow
01-30-2013, 11:23 AM
Unlike ASUS, God didn't give an accidental damage warranty on body parts. :( :D

Shame really, I could use some new parts lmao :p :cool:

Quasimodem
03-17-2013, 01:27 AM
I've tried to install Linux Mint 14 and Ubuntu 12.10 and have a black screen on bootup? I probably need to switch it to the closed-source Nvidia drivers. Has anyone had this issue and been able to fix it?

Quasimodem
03-21-2013, 02:42 AM
I've figured this out, the Nouveau drivers need to be disabled to allow for installation of the Nvidia drivers...

Zygomorphic
03-21-2013, 10:10 AM
I've figured this out, the Nouveau drivers need to be disabled to allow for installation of the Nvidia drivers...

I just installed Mint 14 on my G53SX and it seems to work perfectly with the nouveau drivers. I may end up switching it to the nvidia drivers in the future, but for a regular install, it detected my hardware really well.

Enigma
03-21-2013, 10:21 AM
if you're planning to install and are relatively new to linux then I would go /w Mint or Ubuntu (2nd). Mint is basically a streamlined version of Ubuntu w/o all the excess and no Unity. it boots fast and runs all the same programs. I startex /w Ubuntu but now have Mint installed alongside Win8. You should be able to acclimatize to it very quickly. it also runs good on a stick w/o installation.I also had an issue /w not being able to adjust brightness of the g75vw in Ubuntu, no so issue /w Mint. just one example of how it didnt quite meet my expectations.

Quasimodem
03-22-2013, 05:26 AM
if you're planning to install and are relatively new to linux then I would go /w Mint or Ubuntu (2nd). Mint is basically a streamlined version of Ubuntu w/o all the excess and no Unity. it boots fast and runs all the same programs. I startex /w Ubuntu but now have Mint installed alongside Win8. You should be able to acclimatize to it very quickly. it also runs good on a stick w/o installation.I also had an issue /w not being able to adjust brightness of the g75vw in Ubuntu, no so issue /w Mint. just one example of how it didnt quite meet my expectations.

Just checked and mine doesn't adjust either... I never would have known, never change it...

Quasimodem
05-17-2013, 08:02 PM
I just recently installed Linux Mint 15 RC and it is Amazing... The sound is much louder, and I didn't have the display issues with Mint 14. I can't speak for the Atheros WiFi, I have an Intel Card.

Zygomorphic
05-18-2013, 10:28 AM
I just recently installed Linux Mint 15 RC and it is Amazing... The sound is much louder, and I didn't have the display issues with Mint 14. I can't speak for the Atheros WiFi, I have an Intel Card.

Linux Mint 14 has out-of-the-box support for ASUS backlit keyboards, along with Ubuntu, which is nice. :) I'll try LM 15 when it comes out, or else in a VM. Don't want to bust my currently-running main system.

Quasimodem
06-02-2013, 04:24 AM
Linux Mint 15 RC

Enigma
06-07-2013, 03:57 AM
Right now I'm still running Mint 14, and the only reason I havent installed 15 is that the XFCE version isnt out yet.

Zygomorphic
06-07-2013, 10:16 AM
I am updating to LINUX Mint 15 right now, and I will post back when it finishes. I have LINUX Mint installed natively on my computer, so there is that consideration as well, with regards to XFCE availability. I will check the package repository when it finishes, and let you know if XFCE is out yet.

Quasimodem
06-08-2013, 10:46 PM
I am updating to LINUX Mint 15 right now, and I will post back when it finishes. I have LINUX Mint installed natively on my computer, so there is that consideration as well, with regards to XFCE availability. I will check the package repository when it finishes, and let you know if XFCE is out yet.

You will NOT be disappointed. BTW I am BNaughty, just a name change.

Zygomorphic
06-09-2013, 12:57 AM
You will NOT be disappointed. BTW I am BNaughty, just a name change.
I have updated, though to be honest, I haven't noticed anything really different. Then again, I run my own kernel, so to be fair, I already customize stuff.

Quasimodem
06-17-2013, 04:26 AM
I have updated, though to be honest, I haven't noticed anything really different. Then again, I run my own kernel, so to be fair, I already customize stuff.

It's been great for me so far, the biggest improvement being the sound... I'm not in there much unless I need to build a newer version of Android for my phone, but all hardware works no problems... Haven't tried adjusting the display... Backlit KB works...

Zygomorphic
06-17-2013, 10:13 AM
It's been great for me so far, the biggest improvement being the sound... I'm not in there much unless I need to build a newer version of Android for my phone, but all hardware works no problems... Haven't tried adjusting the display... Backlit KB works...

If you run the latest nVidia drivers through the driver control panel in Mint, you should have backlight control (I do). It is working quite well, and I have gotten all the updates to Mint 15.

Enigma
06-24-2013, 12:33 PM
Linux Mint 15 XFCE edition Release Candidate x86/x64 released! (http://blog.linuxmint.com/?p=2380)

@ Zygomorphic: Beat you to the punchline for the announcement!

The KDE edition RC is out now too.

Zygomorphic
06-25-2013, 01:34 AM
Linux Mint 15 XFCE edition Release Candidate x86/x64 released! (http://blog.linuxmint.com/?p=2380)

@ Zygomorphic: Beat you to the punchline for the announcement!

The KDE edition RC is out now too.
Congratulations! :) You beat me...but I have already been running LINUX Mint 15. :cool: Actually, I am trying to install Gentoo on my laptop as well, just to see what a source-based distro is like. See how much faster it runs. I have been compiling my own kernels as well. :)

Enigma
06-26-2013, 01:01 AM
I didnt run 15 before the RC's release because only the MATE and Cinnamon desktop environments were officially available. I dont want to install a DE i'm not familiar with, in addition to the the XFCE and KDE that I'm used to. It's just too many, 2 is enough for me. Speaking of Gentoo, have you ever thought about trying Arch? I've been testing it out in a VM for months, it's a DIY distro that you build from the ground up, not like Ubuntu or Mint with alot of stuff preinstalled. And the installation is completely text/command-line based. It's pretty complicated to set up, you have to pretty much read their entire FAQ and wiki beforehand. Which is why I tested it first before doing a live install.

Zygomorphic
06-26-2013, 01:27 AM
Actually I haven't. I might try it out though, especially since I now have a VM to try things in without blowing up my system. LOL. I am interested in learning more about the internals of the system, and that's part of why I am trying Gentoo (that, and it is supposed to be faster).

N8tiv
09-01-2017, 08:52 PM
That sounds like the best idea. Figure out which LINUX distros (live and otherwise) work on which ROG hardware. That way, we can encourage ASUS to start officially supporting LINUX! :)


I started looking into certain Linux distro's that kept up with "WINE", mainly because I need Dragon NaturallySpeaking… As long as the mouse grid, and general ability to control the mouse pointer via voice control… I don't mind having to copy and paste from the DragonPad to the command line or Google search or wherever there is text input needed.
I'm a quadriplegic, so "WINE" running Dragon NaturallySpeaking has to work! I read at "WineHQ" that 12.5 of Dragon works fairly well with "WINE".

At wine HQ, they also mentioned something about Ubuntu, Fedora and I think it was Linux Mint where the ones that kept WINE up-to-date the most.

I'm seriously thinking about installing Fedora 26 workstation and just letting it format both of my hard drives, really getting tired of having to run "Advanced System Care Pro Ultimate" almost every other day and then using CCleaner to clean up whatever advanced system care missed!
That's not the end of it, then having to run Windows hidden disk cleanup utility to get rid of whatever advanced system care and CCleaner missed!

It would be super nice to be able to "use my laptop" without having to run these programs almost every other day just to keep the performance up!

RPM Fusion for Fedora, lists the GeoForce GTX 670MX as being supported… Just have to follow some specific instructions, updating the Kernel then disabling a couple of features and eventually downloading/installing the correct Nvidia drivers.
I make it sound really simple, but… There's about 6 steps (give or take 2-3 steps) that I'm forgetting to mention. Just forgot what they were.

I like the idea of Fedora, mainly because my server hardware is running CentOS 7 64-bit… I'd be able to watch what was popular with Fedora, then that would be implemented into Red Hat and then eventually into CentOS.

Fedora 26 Workstation, LXDE, WINE & Dragon NaturallySpeaking 12.5
I'm hoping the installation and configuration of these 4 things will take less than a couple of hours.

Rob