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EckoInLasVegas
01-25-2013, 05:20 PM
Looking at upgrading the CPU in my G74SX from the 2630QM to a 2920XM (Extreme Edition CPU). The OEM CPU is 45W, 32nm tech. The new CPU is 55W, 32nm tech. I know the 55W is more of a thermal issue than an actual power supply issue. Wondering if anyone has any insight before I go plop down a few hundred on a more powerful CPU

dstrakele
01-25-2013, 05:29 PM
Check out other users experience with this upgrade in http://rog.asus.com/forum/showthread.php?17050-2920xm-G74sx-NO-TURBOBOOST. Waste of good money...

EckoInLasVegas
01-25-2013, 11:45 PM
Thanks for the link, that answers my question perfectly

Pitcher@asus
01-28-2013, 03:33 AM
so your consern is slove?

burn0u7
01-30-2013, 08:44 PM
No Mike_Lu@Asus - I think the concerns people are having is the external power supply included with the G74SX's. I think Asus under did it with this one. Should be at VERY LEAST a 235W psu not some craptastic 150W that comes with the units.

At stock settings (NO overclocking of the vid card) set on the performance profile if i were to play a game whether that be Grand Theft Auto IV or Battlefield 3 or even Counter Strike Global Offensive, all at high settings - after about an hour or so of playing, you cant touch the external power supply cause its so hot. i have 5 friends that have a G74SX-DH71 all with defferent levels of expertise and range from novice to advanced IT - all have the same expierences.

It's not worth it to upgrade the CPU on these laptops because the external supplies have insufficient output power.

A request goes to Asus - Let us know a compatible power supply solution - let us know the make and model number of a compatible external power supply for these laptops that is greater than 235W so we can move on with life and upgrade our CPUs to the full potential.

I will still and ALWAYS buy asus boards, laptops, and other devices. PERIOD regardless of the outcome of the external power supply issue.

just my 2 cents worth -- (Actually $1.53 after taxes)

adamsyes
01-31-2013, 12:30 AM
You can still go for the Extreme edition, but honestly as long you don't OC you're 560M

i'd Strongtly recommend you the

Intel® Core™ i7-2860QM Processor
(8M Cache, up to 3.60 GHz)

Mainly because it has 45w and just 0.10ghz off compared to the 3.7 from extreme. Really with this one you will be fine.
http://ark.intel.com/products/53476/Intel-Core-i7-2860QM-Processor-8M-Cache-up-to-3_60-GHz

Zygomorphic
01-31-2013, 02:00 AM
You can still go for the Extreme edition, but honestly as long you don't OC you're 560M

i'd Strongtly recommend you the

Intel® Core™ i7-2860QM Processor
(8M Cache, up to 3.60 GHz)

Mainly because it has 45w and just 0.10ghz off compared to the 3.7 from extreme. Really with this one you will be fine.
http://ark.intel.com/products/53476/Intel-Core-i7-2860QM-Processor-8M-Cache-up-to-3_60-GHz

Difference in performance is essentially nil, since the 55 Watt CPU will be limited by the PSU. Actually, the power supply on my G53SX (15" variant of this laptop) is adequate, even for gaming.

fostert
01-31-2013, 03:31 AM
It's not worth it to upgrade the CPU on these laptops because the external supplies have insufficient output power.


ASUS designed the G74 for a 45W TDP processor...thats the "potential maximum thermally significant power" used by the most energy-consuming processor in the TDP family. The way I read this is that the core i7 2860QM then uses a maximum of 45 Watts total, and processors clocked at lower frequencies but still belonging to the 45W class use proportionally less Watts. Upgrading from a 45W TDP processor to another faster but same 45W TDP processor will draw a bit more power the from the PSU, yes, but if ASUS did things right it budgeted for a maximum 45W contribution from the CPU, even though they may have put in a slower one (e.g. a 2670QM).


A request goes to Asus - Let us know a compatible power supply solution - let us know the make and model number of a compatible external power supply for these laptops that is greater than 235W so we can move on with life and upgrade our CPUs to the full potential.

See this thread: http://rog.asus.com/forum/showthread.php?11644-Charger-Overheating

and see this post: http://rog.asus.com/forum/showthread.php?2329-ATTENTION-G73-53SW-Owners-CPU-Throttling-to-798mhz-and-how-to-fix-it&p=77777&viewfull=1#post77777

for a link to compatble 180W unit that will work fine with the G74, and run cooler. Getting a 230W is complete overkill, since even upgrading to the i7 2860QM from a 2670QM will only increase the power draw by (3.6GHZ-3.1GHZ)/3.1GHZ = 16%, up to a maximum of 45W. So even in the worst case (i.e. ASUS cut corners and the 150W PSU that comes with the G74 can only handle a 2670QM), going to a 180W is more than enough extra power for the fastest 45W TDP processor that the G74 can take.

evga
01-31-2013, 06:33 AM
sell your g74 and get a g75 that would make the performance x 1/2 powerful that before , its not worth spending money on different cpu .
if you still upgrade: you would experience thermal shutdowns and lines goes through the screen if power becomes a limiting factor . If you had a g73 it would be worth upgrading because it has the ability to accommodate with any new graphics cards so a better processor would be useful there to stop bottleneck . but its totally useless for g74 .

EckoInLasVegas
02-05-2013, 09:34 PM
I got the G74 cheap enough...upgrading it is worth it. I like to tinker with my laptops.

Plus stayign with a 45watt cpu, better thermal paste and 180 power supply will be more than sufficient

Zygomorphic
02-06-2013, 12:31 AM
I got the G74 cheap enough...upgrading it is worth it. I like to tinker with my laptops.

Plus stayign with a 45watt cpu, better thermal paste and 180 power supply will be more than sufficient

Should be, the key is that TDP is not only Thermal Design Power, but also Thermal Dissipative Power if you apply it to the cooling system. That's why Apple's overheat, they have a 45 Watt CPU in a 35 Watt TDP cooling system (if that much).

emptythought
02-06-2013, 09:24 AM
and see this post: http://rog.asus.com/forum/showthread.php?2329-ATTENTION-G73-53SW-Owners-CPU-Throttling-to-798mhz-and-how-to-fix-it&p=77777&viewfull=1#post77777

for a link to compatble 180W unit that will work fine with the G74, and run cooler. Getting a 230W is complete overkill, since even upgrading to the i7 2860QM from a 2670QM will only increase the power draw by (3.6GHZ-3.1GHZ)/3.1GHZ = 16%, up to a maximum of 45W. So even in the worst case (i.e. ASUS cut corners and the 150W PSU that comes with the G74 can only handle a 2670QM), going to a 180W is more than enough extra power for the fastest 45W TDP processor that the G74 can take.

Sadly, the link within that thread to the 180w PSU is dead :( i actually destroyed the plug on my 150w unit today(i was attempting to extract a piece of an old pin embedded inside of the plug) and probably would have just ordered it.

to add on to this though, there are other things within the system that would cause a 55w EE cpu to run at minimum speed. remember the BD PROCHOT throttling issues? this would come back to that subsystem.

basically, the VRMs that supply power to the cpu, and the internal power supply within the machine that coverts 19.5 to the various internal voltages are *both* not designed for more than around 150 watts for the entire system. you have 73-75w max for the GPU, and 45w max for the CPU + the bits and bobs of the system. if you have two hard drives, a DVD in the optical drive, and you're playing a demanding game you're probably at the absolute limit of what it was designed to do. this is basically the difference between the beginning of the red demarcation on a cars tachometer, and the actual redline at which the control systems would cut fuel to decrease RPMs

so at 2.5ghz an extreme edition CPU is drawing 45ish watts. even if it's drawing 30, it goes and *requests* more current from the northbridge/interconnect(i know they killed the NB name with the QPI bus, but whatever the hell they call it now) and it says it's already at the maximum state it can step up to.

you could connect a 400 watt power supply to the machine and it would never run a 55cpu at anything but the absolute minimum speed. i'm honestly amazed it even ran at the full non-turbo speed, i'd expect to see it running at 1200mhz or something.

this stuff, by the way, is the same reason that it was incredibly stupid when people were trying to put 470m's and other 100w or otherwise greater than 75 watt cards in the g73jh/jw/etc.

your best bet would be to either get the highest model of non-extreme edition CPU, or even the highest non extreme ivy bridge CPU which uses the same socket. most checks show that out performs the extreme edition anyways.

as an addendum on my comment about the power supply not mattering though, the stock machine does push the PSU to the limit. there is a point to upgrading to the 180w model if you can find it, the main point of this comment is that it won't give you any headroom to run hardware beyond the stock ratings within the machine. it will simply cause the power supply to last longer and run at lower temperatures.

and thinking back on it, when both me and my roommate had g73jh's a few years ago one of our power supplies died a fairly quick death from being hot as the sun. on completely stock machines. i think i was running dirt 3 or something that absolutely taxed the machine to the limit when it died. as i've mentioned before, the notebookcheck reviews show that sometimes the machine can draw slightly more than 150w from the brick.

Zygomorphic
02-06-2013, 11:28 AM
@emptythought, do the Ivy Bridge CPUs use the same socket? If so, then the upgrade would make more sense - if the BIOS supports it. I don't know the answer to those questions, but I thought that I should throw them out there as a consideration.

Like you said, the 180W brick helps when the stock system is overloading the PSU, not when the internal system is overloaded. The internal power distributors are designed for the TDP of the stock parts, not extra.

emptythought
02-06-2013, 11:38 PM
Yes, they're both PGA988. it's very similar to how desktop sandy bridge boards can support ivy bridge chips in the lga1155 socket.

the bios supporting it is up in the air, however many desktop boards didn't require an update. the updates were generally for the support of 1600mhz ram anyways...

if i ever have a damaged ivy bridge machine with a socketed CPU laying around i'll definitely try popping it in my g53sw and seeing what happens. i want to say it would work, and at most not support the higher ram speed though.

it's definitely your only option for getting extreme edition performance with turbo on a sandy bridge G73/53/74 series laptop though.

evga
02-07-2013, 02:15 PM
sorry! it wont work even through the socket fits it because ivy-e bridge and sandy bridge uses different type of instructions sets , dont waste your time and money , best choice is i7 2960xm .

fostert
02-08-2013, 04:50 AM
sorry! it wont work even through the socket fits it because ivy-e bridge and sandy bridge uses different type of instructions sets , dont waste your time and money , best choice is i7 2960xm .

As we've been discussing in this thread, the 2960xm is definitely *not* the best choice for upgrading any G-series laptop, and is rather a waste of $$ considering how much it will throttle and downclock due to overtaxing the coopling system. "Best choice" is a 45W TDP processor, like a 2820 or 2860qm.

evga
02-08-2013, 11:16 AM
but if you change the cooler fan and get a i7 2960xm for cheap then its worth it.

Zygomorphic
02-08-2013, 11:18 AM
sorry! it wont work even through the socket fits it because ivy-e bridge and sandy bridge uses different type of instructions sets , dont waste your time and money , best choice is i7 2960xm .

Actually, the best choice is a 2860QM, which is the fastest non-extreme-edition chip available. Here are the specs according to Intel:
http://ark.intel.com/products/53476/Intel-Core-i7-2860QM-Processor-8M-Cache-up-to-3_60-GHz

fostert
02-08-2013, 10:46 PM
but if you change the cooler fan and get a i7 2960xm for cheap then its worth it.

It is not "worth it". I don't know about the feasibility of changing the fans in the G74, but due to the constrained space in a laptop I doubt its an off-the-shelf component and that a new aftermarket one would do any better. That means I doubt you could hold the CPU cool enough to allow it to ever turbo above 2.7GHZ, let alone get the extra 0.1 GHZ above the 2860QM's maximum turbo clock. Plus, consider the VRMs (mosfets) on the mainboard, which dissipate power stepping down the DCV from the power supply to the ~1.5 volts the CPU requires. By sticking in a 55w TDP cpu, you are effectively overclocking your mainboards power delivery system by ~25%. They will get very hot, believe me, and you will simply shorten the lifespan of your conponents (and hence you whole system) by forcing them to run hotter. All of this for an extra 0.1GHz?

And, if you could get a 2960 at a magic price, then imagine what magic price you could find for a 2860, which is about 1/2 Intel's Recommended Customer Price (Tray)!