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nirO
03-01-2013, 02:10 PM
i bought 2 air can with compressed air online.. it says it can clean computer hardware and many other electronics for dust... so i got it today and wanted to clean my g75vw... i tested it before i hit it and it turns up that the air is so compressed that when it comes out its little liquid ... also if u hit 1 spot it freezes, after little use the can it self it so cold that your hand freeze as well.


any have a clue if i should use this... i mean its like i would put ice water on the hardware lol.

scarletvw
03-01-2013, 02:21 PM
Those cans of air are what pretty much everyone uses, when they are full they will let a little bit of the liquid out. In order to use the cans properly though they need to be perfectly upright, if you tilt it one way or the other and tip it upside down it will shoot out freezing liquid. If held upright they will generally not have any issues.

nirO
03-01-2013, 02:31 PM
Those cans of air are what pretty much everyone uses, when they are full they will let a little bit of the liquid out. In order to use the cans properly though they need to be perfectly upright, if you tilt it one way or the other and tip it upside down it will shoot out freezing liquid. If held upright they will generally not have any issues.

well i did try in all positions possible... same thing where it hits it gives liquid out and it freezes the spot that hits...

only if i press little it gives little air out but with not enuff pressure.

i played with it now for a while with it and its still the same... whenever i hit i see liquid freezing water on the spot i hit :-s

Apexing
03-01-2013, 02:55 PM
honestly i dont see a reason to use thoes cans for this laptop, since you can get acces to the fans very easy, and if its dusty as a mofo use a small brush to get it disloged then vacume very lightly at the area.
I have used the cans for other older laptops. ofc keep it turned of, remove battery and then let it sit 30 min after having used the can. the liquid should evaporate. You can test this out by spraying so it gets liquid onto a flat surface and see if it evaporates.

nirO
03-01-2013, 03:15 PM
well it does evaporate... but if u keep hitting a spot it freezes and free= water and it takes little to melt

a brush is not enuff imo... as i see the laptop is a magnet to dust... i can tell from my usb ports... and just superficial brush wont clean to much since u have to hit it on all sides to get a good cleaning

boofsterb
03-01-2013, 03:40 PM
Gas duster, also known as canned air or compressed air, is a product used for cleaning electronic equipment and other sensitive devices that cannot be cleaned using water. Despite the name "canned air," the cans actually contain gases that are much easier to compress into liquids, such as difluoroethane, trifluoroethane, or tetrafluoroethane. Hydrocarbons, like butane, were often used in the past, but their flammable nature forced manufacturers to use fluorocarbons.

Cleaning
A gas duster is usually used to clean or dust delicate items or to reach difficult areas. Gas dusters are particularly useful for ventilation fans and electronic heat sinks, which collect dust readily and are otherwise very difficult to clean. The gases themselves do not leave residues on sensitive equipment; however, the bitterant added to prevent abuse leaves a residue, making gas dusters an inappropriate choice for cleaning anything users will come into contact with such as keyboards. They can create static electricity[1] unless a specific ESD-safe compound is added.
The can must be held upright during use. Inverting, tilting or even shaking the can during use may result in the unevaporated liquid being forced through the nozzle instead of the gas. The liquid will boil away almost instantly outside the can, producing extreme cold in the process. In liquid form, the contents of the can will act as a solvent, causing unwanted damage to surface coatings or labels, this is generally only a problem with optical lens coatings. Side effects of the intense cold can also cause problems due to localised condensation.

When the can is activated, gas flows out through the nozzle. The pressure inside the can therefore drops, and is no longer sufficient to keep the contents as a liquid; so some of the liquid boils, until the equilibrium pressure is re-established. The vaporization of a liquid is endothermic; thus, heat is absorbed, the temperature can reach −50 C (−58 F), and the can becomes cold.
Continued use over a short period of time results in the reduction of the can's temperature. As the temperature drops, the vapor pressure of the liquid also drops, resulting in decreasing force of the gas at the nozzle. When the force of the ejected gas at the nozzle is insufficient to accomplish anything useful in terms of dust removal, and the temperature of the can reaches the boiling point of the liquid (which is −25 C (−13 F) for difluoroethane), the liquid no longer evaporates into gas in any useful quantity. The can must then return to room temperature before it will again provide sufficient gas flow. Alternating between two cans (allowing one to warm while the other is being used) is one way to work around this problem during an extensive dusting job. Warming the can with a heat source can be dangerous as the can may overheat and explode.


(I think the craziest part of compressed air is the fact that they add bitterant to prevent people from huffing the gas)

nirO
03-01-2013, 04:13 PM
Gas duster, also known as canned air or compressed air, is a product used for cleaning electronic equipment and other sensitive devices that cannot be cleaned using water. Despite the name "canned air," the cans actually contain gases that are much easier to compress into liquids, such as difluoroethane, trifluoroethane, or tetrafluoroethane. Hydrocarbons, like butane, were often used in the past, but their flammable nature forced manufacturers to use fluorocarbons.

Cleaning
A gas duster is usually used to clean or dust delicate items or to reach difficult areas. Gas dusters are particularly useful for ventilation fans and electronic heat sinks, which collect dust readily and are otherwise very difficult to clean. The gases themselves do not leave residues on sensitive equipment; however, the bitterant added to prevent abuse leaves a residue, making gas dusters an inappropriate choice for cleaning anything users will come into contact with such as keyboards. They can create static electricity[1] unless a specific ESD-safe compound is added.
The can must be held upright during use. Inverting, tilting or even shaking the can during use may result in the unevaporated liquid being forced through the nozzle instead of the gas. The liquid will boil away almost instantly outside the can, producing extreme cold in the process. In liquid form, the contents of the can will act as a solvent, causing unwanted damage to surface coatings or labels, this is generally only a problem with optical lens coatings. Side effects of the intense cold can also cause problems due to localised condensation.

When the can is activated, gas flows out through the nozzle. The pressure inside the can therefore drops, and is no longer sufficient to keep the contents as a liquid; so some of the liquid boils, until the equilibrium pressure is re-established. The vaporization of a liquid is endothermic; thus, heat is absorbed, the temperature can reach −50 C (−58 F), and the can becomes cold.
Continued use over a short period of time results in the reduction of the can's temperature. As the temperature drops, the vapor pressure of the liquid also drops, resulting in decreasing force of the gas at the nozzle. When the force of the ejected gas at the nozzle is insufficient to accomplish anything useful in terms of dust removal, and the temperature of the can reaches the boiling point of the liquid (which is −25 C (−13 F) for difluoroethane), the liquid no longer evaporates into gas in any useful quantity. The can must then return to room temperature before it will again provide sufficient gas flow. Alternating between two cans (allowing one to warm while the other is being used) is one way to work around this problem during an extensive dusting job. Warming the can with a heat source can be dangerous as the can may overheat and explode.


(I think the craziest part of compressed air is the fact that they add bitterant to prevent people from huffing the gas)

well good to know that help somehow... still now that we know how it works... should i use it or not ... i guess i will have to leave it to dry good after i use it if i do... did not decided yet if i wanna risk burn it ^^

Pitcher@asus
03-04-2013, 06:01 AM
it is good idea for clean cooling system.

srmojuze
03-04-2013, 07:34 AM
(Oops... Duplicate)

srmojuze
03-04-2013, 07:37 AM
well good to know that help somehow... still now that we know how it works... should i use it or not ... i guess i will have to leave it to dry good after i use it if i do... did not decided yet if i wanna risk burn it ^^

Basically, when something is under very, very, very high pressure, when it comes out, it "blasts" out because outside pressure is much, much lower. So, this "blasts" the dust out of certain parts. But it also causes things around it to become ~cold~, because when it comes out then expands it takes heat to expand.

Sometimes, there is condensation from air water vapour and also unevaporated liquid.

So, keep the can upright, then point it somewhere to test, press it, and if there is no "liquid" around, then it should be fine.

If there is "liquid" even holding the can upright, then either it's not the best brand, or there is very high humidity that is causing water vapour condensation.

Maybe try a different brand of compressed air, I've used it in the past and it's good for cleaning my aftermarket desktop CPU fan, and it's fun too...!

Yes, don't sniff it, and DO NOT SPRAY IT ON YOUR BODY PARTS INCLUDING (BUT NOT LIMITED TO:)) YOUR HAND. You'll get freezer burns.