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JoeMez
03-02-2013, 10:10 PM
I'm sure that across all the forums here I'd be able to find the information I want, but I want it all collected here, as well as get answers to other questions about overclocking my 660M.
1)First off, what constraints limit the level of overclocking that can be done? I understand heat buildup is one of, if not the major, issue- are there other results that need to be kept in check? Related to the heat buildup, what temperature ranges are safe to prevent damage to the 660M? Can anyone suggest a program or such to keep tabs of the gpu temperature over a long range of time, to help make track of the heat level? Or even cause an alarm if the temperature gets too high?

2)I played around with nVidia Inspector when I first looked into overclocking- for the memory clock it can alter, is that the GDDR3 (or whatever) that is the VRAM on the 660M gpu unit? Or is it the regular RAM for the system?

3)I noticed the nVidia Inspector allowed for clock shortcuts- could I just set one shortcut for stock 660M, use that for the games- or everyday use- I have that wouldn't benefit from overclocking- League of Legends, Portal 2, etc-,then switch to the increased clock for a more intensive game, like Skyrim or Battlefield 3? Would switching back and forth between the two clock levels cause concernable strain on the gpu? Even if the clock level I decide on is entirely safe for 24/7 use, I'd probably want to set the clock to the stock levels when not in use, just to be extra safe.

4)I think I'd feel safest clocking up to the level of a stock 670M- about how much would that be? If I were to use the nVidia Inspector again, would that be +75, +100, or what? and how much would be added to the memory clock?

5)Overclocked to the level of the 670M, would I need to worry much about the increased heat levels? I understand that the 660M is much cooler than the 670M, due to the 660M being newer architecture or something. I assume that the G75's cooling system is the same regardless of wither there's a 660M or 670M inside, so would an overclocked 660M, to the level of a stock 670M, produce enough heat to overcome the level of a stock 670M- overcoming the cooling abilities of my G75VW?

6)If I feel brave and exceed the level of the stock 670M, what is a 'maximum' clock that would be safe for the 660M? What clock levels are the absolute maximum it can handle while used in a game that really strains the gpu, like Battlefield 3, over several hours? Some of what I've read talks about altering the BIOS to exceed an increased clock of +135- I will in no way do that. I'll stay within the limits of the nVidia Inspector- or what ever program is suggested as preferable.

7)Really the only game I have that would be affected by overclocking is Battlefield 3, and I intend to get Skyrim soon. How much of an improvement would I get on Battlefield 3? Currently I get around 35-40 fps in smaller areas, dipping to 30 or even 25 in really big, detailed areas. Using Skyrim's HD texture pack, about how much improvement would be expected when the 660M is overclocked compared to a stock 660M? Playing either game over a period of several hours, would the heat buildup go to a level that might damage the gpu?

8)How much do I risk by overclocking? If the cooling system can compensate for the increase, over periods of several hours, do I need to be concerned in any way? I wouldn't leave the system at the increased clock 24/7, of course- after I'm done playing a game it'd be right back to stock levels. Or might it be that first time trying an unknown defect in my gpu causes it to shatter? What are the chances of damage, and in what ways? What will I need to watch for to prevent any damage, at any overclock level?

9)Finally, would the risk of overclocking be worth it? Would I get a significant upgrade in fps - something in the range of the same fps at noticeably higher quality, or +15 fps at the same level-, or will the increase be an insignificant 1-2 fps difference for the same graphic quality level?

I hope that the answers to all my questions leave me with an idea of the level of clock that can be turned on to play BF3 or Skyrim, for a few hours, without me needing to worry every few minutes about how the 660M is taking any increased strain, then set back to stock when I'm done playing with no decrease done to the gpu's integrity.

Thank you in advance to anyone who responds and helps out.

bignazpwns
03-02-2013, 10:37 PM
I'm sure that across all the forums here I'd be able to find the information I want, but I want it all collected here, as well as get answers to other questions about overclocking my 660M.
1)First off, what constraints limit the level of overclocking that can be done? I understand heat buildup is one of, if not the major, issue- are there other results that need to be kept in check? Related to the heat buildup, what temperature ranges are safe to prevent damage to the 660M? Can anyone suggest a program or such to keep tabs of the gpu temperature over a long range of time, to help make track of the heat level? Or even cause an alarm if the temperature gets too high?

The GPU its self will shut down before it gets to hot. ITs been like that for years. All of them have temp cut offs like CPU's

2)I played around with nVidia Inspector when I first looked into overclocking- for the memory clock it can alter, is that the GDDR3 (or whatever) that is the VRAM on the 660M gpu unit? Or is it the regular RAM for the system?

That is the ram for your card.

3)I noticed the nVidia Inspector allowed for clock shortcuts- could I just set one shortcut for stock 660M, use that for the games- or everyday use- I have that wouldn't benefit from overclocking- League of Legends, Portal 2, etc-,then switch to the increased clock for a more intensive game, like Skyrim or Battlefield 3? Would switching back and forth between the two clock levels cause concernable strain on the gpu? Even if the clock level I decide on is entirely safe for 24/7 use, I'd probably want to set the clock to the stock levels when not in use, just to be extra safe.

Nvidia inspector you make a few desktop shortcuts and just click your oc to game and force the oc pstate or you just click your low power on and use that to save power. I ran a GTX 660m at 1300mhz on the core for 4 months solid heavy use with no problems.

4)I think I'd feel safest clocking up to the level of a stock 670M- about how much would that be? If I were to use the nVidia Inspector again, would that be +75, +100, or what? and how much would be added to the memory clock?

Dapends. But its going to be in the 800-900mhz range on the core.

5)Overclocked to the level of the 670M, would I need to worry much about the increased heat levels? I understand that the 660M is much cooler than the 670M, due to the 660M being newer architecture or something. I assume that the G75's cooling system is the same regardless of wither there's a 660M or 670M inside, so would an overclocked 660M, to the level of a stock 670M, produce enough heat to overcome the level of a stock 670M- overcoming the cooling abilities of my G75VW?

Kepler is the fonz of gpu's. Very cool so when i had my GTX 660m overclocked to 1,100mhz it ran cooler then my old fermi gtx 670m at stock clocks. My card at 1300 on the core was 5c hotter then a stock GTX 670m. But temps vary from system to system.

6)If I feel brave and exceed the level of the stock 670M, what is a 'maximum' clock that would be safe for the 660M? What clock levels are the absolute maximum it can handle while used in a game that really strains the gpu, like Battlefield 3, over several hours? Some of what I've read talks about altering the BIOS to exceed an increased clock of +135- I will in no way do that. I'll stay within the limits of the nVidia Inspector- or what ever program is suggested as preferable.

You will max out before you go higher enought to kill the card. You can push it to about 1300-1400 if your lucky without needing more voltage for the card. For most people they top out at 1,100-1,200 the higher ones are people who got lucky and got really good clocking cards.

7)Really the only game I have that would be affected by overclocking is Battlefield 3, and I intend to get Skyrim soon. How much of an improvement would I get on Battlefield 3? Currently I get around 35-40 fps in smaller areas, dipping to 30 or even 25 in really big, detailed areas. Using Skyrim's HD texture pack, about how much improvement would be expected when the 660M is overclocked compared to a stock 660M? Playing either game over a period of several hours, would the heat buildup go to a level that might damage the gpu?

This depends on drivers and what not. But overclocked with a good clock by the numbers you posted you can fix your lag problem.

8)How much do I risk by overclocking? If the cooling system can compensate for the increase, over periods of several hours, do I need to be concerned in any way? I wouldn't leave the system at the increased clock 24/7, of course- after I'm done playing a game it'd be right back to stock levels. Or might it be that first time trying an unknown defect in my gpu causes it to shatter? What are the chances of damage, and in what ways? What will I need to watch for to prevent any damage, at any overclock level?

High overclocks make heat. So you run the risk fo heat. It increase power draw on the system so you can damage your psu or mobo. I can it heavly overclocks and the system can power it pretty good. It can handle a oc'ed GTX 670mx thats pulling about 95w of power. Your GTX 660m wont ever go past about 75w unless you voltmod it and clock it to some crazy clock that i dont even think it will pull.

9)Finally, would the risk of overclocking be worth it? Would I get a significant upgrade in fps - something in the range of the same fps at noticeably higher quality, or +15 fps at the same level-, or will the increase be an insignificant 1-2 fps difference for the same graphic quality level?

To each his own. Safe overclocks there is no risk. This has a pretty big window for kepler. I mean some games you can gain 15-20fps very easy others dont respond as well to overclock but still show improvement.

I hope that the answers to all my questions leave me with an idea of the level of clock that can be turned on to play BF3 or Skyrim, for a few hours, without me needing to worry every few minutes about how the 660M is taking any increased strain, then set back to stock when I'm done playing with no decrease done to the gpu's integrity.

Thank you in advance to anyone who responds and helps out.


Added my advice in there.

But to oc higher then what is extremely safe and low for overclocking kepler you can do it with any problem. If you want higher you need to force pstates and with the new drivers you pretty much cant force them now. Some drivers even when i would force the pstarte and set it for a 900mhz clock ti would not go higher then something like 764mhz. So i had to use a older driver to get the higher clock i wanted.

Guido7142
05-12-2013, 06:31 AM
You can flash a custom bios like this one http://forum.techinferno.com/asus-gaming-notebook-forum/2538-%5Bg75vw%5D-modified-bios-vbios-higher-overclocking.html and you will be able to overclock with no limits without the need of NVidia Inspector and with any driver. I use a stabe OC of 1280 MHz Core and +500 on memory (don't remember the base clock of the memory) and temps do not exceed the 68C, never got to 70 yet during Crysis 3. I did a repaste with MX-4 which helped A LOT and cleaned the heatsinks until they were shiny so most of that awesome temps are due to that. Flashing you bios can be risky but I'ts your call.

superman2k2
05-21-2013, 12:06 AM
Anywhere else to download the bios from. I tried but since I was a new member it wouldn't let me?

Guido7142
05-21-2013, 03:41 AM
I uploaded for you all the files you might need:

http://rapidgator.net/file/ff0948772a033fdef2f9d62d1b4893b0/Asus_G75VW_-_BIOS_v223_-_[unlocked]_[overclock_edition].rar.html
http://rapidgator.net/file/8337cb6476e936ac4bcf21729d883235/Asus_G75VW_-_BIOS_v223_-_[unlocked].rar.html
http://rapidgator.net/file/f38986e77fe602255c9f995579dbf9cf/Fptw64.zip.html
http://rapidgator.net/file/d76c2b74c9edbfd8fc2fa9bf9ec412b7/G75VW-BiosFixer.zip.html


Tell me if it worked or if you need any other files.

superman2k2
05-21-2013, 05:32 AM
Thx for the help If its not too much trouble I could use a guide. I did read one on http://forum.notebookreview.com/gaming-software-graphics-cards/677169-nvidia-mobile-kepler-6xx-master-overclocking-guide-workaround-max-clocks-oc-stability.html But for the life of me I don't understand what Im reading. I will let you know if the files work the site is making me wait 120 minutes per file

Guido7142
05-21-2013, 06:32 AM
Sorry for the waiting between downloads, did not know that. Right now I can't write you a guide but if you wait untill tomorrow or end of today I will post a little instruction line so you can flash this custom bios that unlocks the clocks of the GPU.

superman2k2
05-21-2013, 06:43 AM
Thank You that would be great

superman2k2
05-21-2013, 06:48 AM
Thank You that would be great [I]f you can please include the setting to overclock the 660m to a 670m and once again Thank you

srmojuze
05-21-2013, 09:23 AM
Hi DONT FLASH BIOS if you can avoid it, you don't need to flash anything. For 660M download the latest Beta 320.00+ driver from Nvidia. Install. Download latest NvidiaInspector.

Use the following .bat files, use different ones for desired settings:

Eg. for 1200mhz core 3000mhz mem (maximum for myself, lower is usually more stable):

nvidiaInspector.exe -setBaseClockOffset:0,0,135 -setMemoryClockOffset:0,0,0 -setVoltageOffset:0,0,0 -setGpuClock:0,2,1200 -setMemoryClock:0,2,3000 -forcepstate:0,0

To RESET to stock:

nvidiaInspector.exe -setVoltageOffset:0,0,0 -setGpuClock:0,2,835 -setMemoryClock:0,2,2500 -forcepstate:0,16

srmojuze
05-21-2013, 09:35 AM
"1)First off, what constraints limit the level of overclocking that can be done? I understand heat buildup is one of, if not the major, issue- are there other results that need to be kept in check? Related to the heat buildup, what temperature ranges are safe to prevent damage to the 660M? Can anyone suggest a program or such to keep tabs of the gpu temperature over a long range of time, to help make track of the heat level? Or even cause an alarm if the temperature gets too high?"

Simple answer is any overclock that gives you stable gaming performance over several hours is fine. There are deeper technical discussions but that is the simplest answer, I feel.

"2)I played around with nVidia Inspector when I first looked into overclocking- for the memory clock it can alter, is that the GDDR3 (or whatever) that is the VRAM on the 660M gpu unit? Or is it the regular RAM for the system?"

Nvidia Inspector overclocks core and VRAM. CPU and regular RAM is not affected.

"3)I noticed the nVidia Inspector allowed for clock shortcuts- could I just set one shortcut for stock 660M, use that for the games- or everyday use- I have that wouldn't benefit from overclocking- League of Legends, Portal 2, etc-,then switch to the increased clock for a more intensive game, like Skyrim or Battlefield 3? Would switching back and forth between the two clock levels cause concernable strain on the gpu? Even if the clock level I decide on is entirely safe for 24/7 use, I'd probably want to set the clock to the stock levels when not in use, just to be extra safe."

Yes, I use .bat files for what games I want to overclock to what level, then set back to stock when not gaming.

"4)I think I'd feel safest clocking up to the level of a stock 670M- about how much would that be? If I were to use the nVidia Inspector again, would that be +75, +100, or what? and how much would be added to the memory clock?"

Depends on a lot of factors, but by most accounts for 660M we see +150mhz on core and +300mhz on mem easily.

"5)Overclocked to the level of the 670M, would I need to worry much about the increased heat levels? I understand that the 660M is much cooler than the 670M, due to the 660M being newer architecture or something. I assume that the G75's cooling system is the same regardless of wither there's a 660M or 670M inside, so would an overclocked 660M, to the level of a stock 670M, produce enough heat to overcome the level of a stock 670M- overcoming the cooling abilities of my G75VW?"

Kepler runs cooler, no doubt. AFAIK if you remove the bottom case people find very acceptable balance between heat and high performance.

"6)If I feel brave and exceed the level of the stock 670M, what is a 'maximum' clock that would be safe for the 660M? What clock levels are the absolute maximum it can handle while used in a game that really strains the gpu, like Battlefield 3, over several hours? Some of what I've read talks about altering the BIOS to exceed an increased clock of +135- I will in no way do that. I'll stay within the limits of the nVidia Inspector- or what ever program is suggested as preferable."

No need to alter BIOS with 320.00+ drivers from Nvidia. As with overclocking make small increments and see if it is stable. You will easily find the "maximum" because you will see instability, artifacts, etc.

"7)Really the only game I have that would be affected by overclocking is Battlefield 3, and I intend to get Skyrim soon. How much of an improvement would I get on Battlefield 3? Currently I get around 35-40 fps in smaller areas, dipping to 30 or even 25 in really big, detailed areas. Using Skyrim's HD texture pack, about how much improvement would be expected when the 660M is overclocked compared to a stock 660M? Playing either game over a period of several hours, would the heat buildup go to a level that might damage the gpu?"

Damage is something I can't personally claim I understand, but overclocking can bring about noticeable improvements and the Asus gaming notebooks do have very good cooling systems for a notebook form factor.

"8)How much do I risk by overclocking? If the cooling system can compensate for the increase, over periods of several hours, do I need to be concerned in any way? I wouldn't leave the system at the increased clock 24/7, of course- after I'm done playing a game it'd be right back to stock levels. Or might it be that first time trying an unknown defect in my gpu causes it to shatter? What are the chances of damage, and in what ways? What will I need to watch for to prevent any damage, at any overclock level?"

From my overclocking of desktop and laptop components, if you are getting a stable overclock for say several hours of gaming without crashing, this has never affected the hardware for at least 1-2 years. After that, I do not know. I don't want to promise something that may not be true. Of course, never overclock if your ambient room temperature is anywhere higher than 28degC/85degF IMO...!

"9)Finally, would the risk of overclocking be worth it? Would I get a significant upgrade in fps - something in the range of the same fps at noticeably higher quality, or +15 fps at the same level-, or will the increase be an insignificant 1-2 fps difference for the same graphic quality level? "

It is worth it as long as, IMHO, you DO NOT modify any BIOS and DO NOT overclock to instability.

Enjoy...!

Guido7142
05-21-2013, 11:40 PM
The thing is the following.

Flashing a bios is always risky, if you could avoid flashing it, that would be the best choice. Now, with the official 223 bios we all know that without NVidia Inspector you could OC the GPU (with tools like MSI Afterburner or EVGA Precision X, etc) but just up to +135MHz (total of 1085MHz on the core) and the memory I don't remember if it has a limit with stock bios. Then it came up a method using NVidia Inspector that forced certain P states on the GPU and let us go past the +135 barrier. P states are the names that it is used to describe certain clock behaviors, some lock the clock at max frequency, others just ramp up the clock when needed and drop it don when not needed, and there are some other P states. The thing got tricky when some time ago, nVidia released its 310 drivers and the NVidia Inspector method suddenly stopped working and we were once again unable to go past the +135 barrier. At that time is where everyone went on flashing this custom bios that unlock the core and memory clock directly in the bios and let us go as far as we want without the need of Inspector, just with Precision or any other OCing tool.

Apparently, as from what I see with SrMojuze's post, now with drivers 320 you can do the Inspector tick once again, thus eliminating the need to flash a custom bios.

If you are interested in knowing how to do the Inspector trick after you read my post and SrMojuze's post, let me know and I will give you some guidelines about how to do it.

Hope it helps.

(Just as a temptation, I have my core at 1280 stable, without exceeding the 70C, I repasted with MX-4. Just set the OC when need it for gaming, if doing non GPU intensive tasks I have it on stock clocks and everything stays under 40)

JoeMez
05-27-2013, 05:38 AM
Guido7142, I would greatly appreciate any sort of how-to for the inspector trick you would care to write. Would it matter that I have BIOS version 207, as opposed to 223? I'll update it if necessary, but I understand that it's a rather risky process.
Thank you to everyone who has put information forward!

HulkSmash
05-27-2013, 01:38 PM
Hey bignazpwns and everyone else, driver 320.00 and above, do allow you to OC by forcing PStates...

Guido7142
05-29-2013, 06:16 PM
JoeMez, I will write a small guide as soon as I have some time to do so. I think that by Saturday I will be posting it.

srmojuze
09-25-2014, 10:56 AM
Try this overclock.bat
nvidiaInspector.exe -forcepstate:0,0 -setGpuClock:0,2,1000 -setMemoryClock:0,2,2950

Try this to reset everything
nvidiaInspector.exe -setVoltageOffset:0,0,0 -setGpuClock:0,2,835 -setMemoryClock:0,2,2500 -forcepstate:0,16

Corbe
10-22-2014, 07:58 PM
Can anyone send me unlocked bios for Asus G75vw v223 or send me link to download?

Indyjones
10-29-2014, 08:15 PM
Does this still work for the newest drivers? thanks :)

srmojuze
10-30-2014, 07:05 AM
Can anyone send me unlocked bios for Asus G75vw v223 or send me link to download?

I don't think you need an unlocked BIOS for overclocking to work?


Does this still work for the newest drivers? thanks :)

AFAIK yes, been overclocking the last few months.

Indyjones
10-30-2014, 03:12 PM
If you are interested in knowing how to do the Inspector trick after you read my post and SrMojuze's post, let me know and I will give you some guidelines about how to do it.
Can you post a link to these two threads. Thanks :) Much appreciated (I usually use Afterburner, but I'd like to give this a try)

Indyjones
10-31-2014, 04:40 PM
srmojuze, I'm using your overclock.bat files, and they seem to be working :) However, when I reset to stock clocks, Memory read 2499Mhz, not 2500? Do you know why? Thanks :)

Indyjones
10-31-2014, 04:45 PM
PS: Or was it always 2499 MHZ? I didn't really notice before...

Indyjones
10-31-2014, 05:51 PM
One more thing, when I overclock using p-states, it shows the oc in Nvidia Inspector, but in GPU-Z, it still gives me the stock clock (it does show the increased memory clock though)...does that mean it didn't work, or what's going on...I'm a little confused...
I'm assuming that the oc isn't working with the newest driver :(

srmojuze
11-23-2014, 04:09 PM
srmojuze, I'm using your overclock.bat files, and they seem to be working :) However, when I reset to stock clocks, Memory read 2499Mhz, not 2500? Do you know why? Thanks :)

Hey I just noticed that, not sure why.


PS: Or was it always 2499 MHZ? I didn't really notice before...

Maybe when resetting it is off by 1 mhz?


One more thing, when I overclock using p-states, it shows the oc in Nvidia Inspector, but in GPU-Z, it still gives me the stock clock (it does show the increased memory clock though)...does that mean it didn't work, or what's going on...I'm a little confused...
I'm assuming that the oc isn't working with the newest driver :(

In GPU-Z clicking on "sensors" tab shows the correct overclock as shown in Nvidia Inspector.

Just tested 660M with latest Nvidia WHQL drivers, all overclock working well! :)

Mr.Whiterain
02-04-2016, 03:52 AM
Rez'd.

As of 2/3/16 what are the drivers I need to OC the 660m? Apparently it can be done now drivers are conflicting with it. I can run @1200mhz gpu @2500mhz memory and the driver crashes, and then the game does.

I deleted nvidia experience too, I didn't know that was possible... If you don't want it, unistall it from the control panel. When you go to update your drivers do a "custom" install and de-select it.

Indyjones
02-06-2016, 12:25 AM
P states don't seem to work anymore. Max you're going to get is +135MHz. I use Afterburner to overclock.

Mr.Whiterain
02-06-2016, 04:50 AM
P states don't seem to work anymore. Max you're going to get is +135MHz. I use Afterburner to overclock.

I recently learned the G75VW is compatible with EXP GDC eGPU (http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B013P0T3AE?colid=MLJR7I40QP9I&coliid=I3ADZQ8ER0ME7Z&ref_=wl_it_dp_o_pC_nS_ttl), I'm trying to get further instructions on how to install it and the external gpu... What I do know is you have to open the case, remove your internal wifi adapter and plug it into your PCI-E port. You will have to make an opening in the back of your case to run the cord out if you want to re-close the case...

However, I do not know anything more, I am not sure if it's plug-n-play. I'll make a post about it if/when I get further details.

slayer7003
03-14-2016, 09:07 PM
Team, Does anybody still has this file, techinferno is not working and Slv7 is not working modifying bioses anymore, I have this computer G75VW and I want to push it to the limits now that it is becoming obsolete.

Dreamonic
03-15-2016, 01:21 AM
You could visit my site at VOLTGROUND for that as I do it too, link is in my signature.

slayer7003
03-17-2016, 07:25 PM
@Dreamonic thank you so much for the information, I am browsing your site as we speak!! Nice website by the way!!:cool: and very complete!!

slayer7003
03-18-2016, 05:20 PM
You could visit my site at VOLTGROUND for that as I do it too, link is in my signature.
Thank you for putting up all the information regarding OC an Asus laptop, I was never able to do it myself, but with the documentation on your site I was finally able to unlock my bios with ease!!

Dreamonic
03-18-2016, 05:54 PM
I know some of my guides are very extensive but I felt the need to go through as much as possible so that you know what will happen and what could happen along the way.

That's great to know! Thanks.

Chrizzy
02-12-2017, 08:29 AM
I know some of my guides are very extensive but I felt the need to go through as much as possible so that you know what will happen and what could happen along the way.

That's great to know! Thanks.

I like ur work!
Whats the difference between ur work and svl7s modified bioses ?!
Currently I dont have a unlocked voltage slider or temp limit. Also wounder if its possible to unlock the fan slider?! Could be nice to control the pwm fans on the G75vw with 660m.
Also qurious, is there any way of making the G75vw bios compartible with GTX1050/60/70/80 ?! Im thinking of trying out GDC Beast v8 with a GTX card but Im unsure if these GTX cards is compartible with the bios ?!

Dreamonic
02-12-2017, 10:49 AM
Thanks,

I don't know. I simply started comparing desktop GPU VBIOS ROMs with mobile GPU VBIOS ROMs, and through trial and error hex editing until it worked. Since desktop GPU VBIOS has nearly everything already unlocked, it's a matter of matching microarchitecture relative to GPU models and referenced specs. So having unlocked voltage control, higher voltage limits (above 1.2v), fixing vdroop, increasing power tables, functional temp targets, increasing OC limits. Plus play around with KBT/MBT enough and you can figure out the boost state count pointers, P-state control pointers, and various other controls.

Take a look at my Pascal hex finds to get a better idea (also on this forum).

Regarding the fan slider.. ASUS fan logic control is done via EC FW. So utilities like NBFC should be used to force fan speeds based on specific registers like 151 and 152 or 165 and 166 (use RWEverything to view it); 144 register can be used for tripping both fans to the max speed allowable (between 3600 ~ 4200rpm), but a shutdown is required to reset fan states if that register is used.

I cannot say whether or not it's fully compatible with Pascal MXM GPUs. Since most G-series have the iGPU disabled, and whether or not it works with LVDS display interface (eDP it should), also certain supporting modules in the BIOS have to match the Device ID of the new GPU too. Regarding upgrading a G75 model specifically, the last semi-working GPU upgrade was with a 780M from the G750JH. That thread is located somewhere on this forum. We went from disabling the SOIC onboard the 780M through shorting pin#1 and pin#8, to removing the MXM signature in the VBIOS and inserting it as an OROM in the system BIOS instead. It booted finally into Windows and drivers were installed but because the mod was so physically involved like shaving the 780M heatsink assembly fin array was required to fit, to removing the heatpipes from existing heatsink assembly to the one in it's place, chassis modifications to fit everything in as stock as possible, it eventually just went to a black screen. Swapping back the 660M corrected POST but the 780M no longer booted properly. We believe it to be a faulty GPU as it was purchased off Ebay, and considering the mod involved, no way of knowing with just a plug and play at first install. 0neWinged did a spectacular job with his modifications as well.

So all while experimenting as he had no SPI programmer on hand in the event of a brick, so I had to be careful with my modifications too. Learn a lot through projects like that.


Doing an eGPU setup would just mean external display might be required depending on the eGPU setup, as mostly Optimus only setups seem to support the internal display with no problems. I had made a thread a while back regarding nearly all ROG Notebooks if the CPU/GPU was upgradeable and if eGPU setups can be done as well. Link is here: https://rog.asus.com/forum/showthread.php?90037-Can-I-upgrade-the-CPU-or-GPU-in-my-ROG-Notebook-***-List-of-supported-models-***.

ChrizzyReviews
02-12-2017, 01:22 PM
Thanks,

I don't know....


Preciate your answer!
Beast eGpu v8 comes with a editing dos tool to configure the device id and much more - maybe I should give it a shot. Currently Im running my g75 as a htpc/gamer connected to my led tv and to a asus rog screen when playing games so its not used as a portable anymore.

I tryed your vbios, strangely it didnt work, all flashes passed but the voltage is locked at 1,1 and core clock got a limit of +135 Im using afterburner but the voltage controller is greyed out :/ Checked the unlock voltage control, no difference.
No idea why...

Went back to stock 223 bios and reflashed with svl7's vbios and everything works.

My motherboard came with 218 bios but after I flashed with 223 stock bios the keyboard lights went black, doesnt even lit up under post :s

Can u check my bios dump file and see if u find anything wrong in there?!8

Dreamonic
02-12-2017, 05:41 PM
Depending on your selected UEFI or Legacy boot modes, there are different VBIOS versions located in the BIOS region, which will determine which ROM is used, unmodified or the modified ROM. The replacement was for OROM, so Legacy (Launch CSM enabled) needs to be used. If UEFI boot mode is selected, that VBIOS version would need to be modified as well; 3D models use different versions too. Take note in GPU-Z the BIOS version string changing with different boot modes.

Anyway, regarding the KB lights. Recently after constructing an 8MB BIOS image for programming a G752VL, the same thing happened to someone where nothing worked but programming one of his older dumped but known to be working KB light BIOS images; The Gary Key fix did not work for him. We believe it's in the non-critical blocks, as even downloaded ASUS 6MB BIOS image merged with existing ME FW didn't recover it either. Trial and error.

Dreamonic
02-12-2017, 06:37 PM
UEFITool VBIOS version breakdown using G75VW BIOS 223 - 660M

38 30 2E 30 37 2E 32 43 2E 30 30 2E 31 34: 80.07.2C.00.14 (CSMCORE/UEFI)
38 30 2E 30 37 2E 32 43 2E 30 30 2E 31 35: 80.07.2C.00.15 (CSMCORE/OROM/Legacy)
38 30 2E 30 37 2E 32 43 2E 30 30 2E 31 42: 80.07.2C.00.1B (C5D~95 GUID/UEFI)
38 30 2E 30 37 2E 32 43 2E 30 30 2E 31 45: 80.07.2C.00.1E (C5D~97 GUID/UEFI)

The 3D display 120Hz supported models use one of the C5D GUID VBIOS.

Chrizzy
02-12-2017, 09:49 PM
Depending on your selected UEFI or Legacy boot modes, there are different VBIOS versions located in the BIOS region, which will determine which ROM is used, unmodified or the modified ROM. The replacement was for OROM, so Legacy (Launch CSM enabled) needs to be used. If UEFI boot mode is selected, that VBIOS version would need to be modified as well; 3D models use different versions too. Take note in GPU-Z the BIOS version string changing with different boot modes.

Anyway, regarding the KB lights. Recently after constructing an 8MB BIOS image for programming a G752VL, the same thing happened to someone where nothing worked but programming one of his older dumped but known to be working KB light BIOS images; The Gary Key fix did not work for him. We believe it's in the non-critical blocks, as even downloaded ASUS 6MB BIOS image merged with existing ME FW didn't recover it either. Trial and error.

Okey, I have CSM turned off. Ill try yours once again :)
Currently Im running 1328mhz core and 5000mhz mem +60C @ load.

Dreamonic
02-12-2017, 10:30 PM
Since you're using MSI Afterburner, you can also use the voltage control fix here (http://voltground.com/haven/threads/20/).
That's a good OC! Good bin! When I had a G75VW, this is what my 660M overclock was:

http://i40.tinypic.com/2gx3dc2.png

ChrizzyReviews
02-12-2017, 10:50 PM
Tryed to update with ur bios again with oprom on - flash passed without errors, ctrl + alt + delete and boom, dead!!
Nothing happens when trying to turn it on, not even the charging led is on :/ Tried to short the jst jumpers, nothing. Took out the cmos battery and shorted the pins, nothing.
No idea if its the bios that got bricked or the motherboard that died.. just replaced the damn motherboard for $270 :(

Possible to do a bios flash without taking out the chip?

Dreamonic
02-12-2017, 11:06 PM
It's unrelated to the VBIOS. Are you using FPT to flash? The system BIOS has always been buggy in the G75 models, this is documented enough on the ROG forum with just changing a setting in the BIOS menus and it bricks after saving.

If you have no power at all, then the system BIOS flash corrupted the boot and likely recovery blocks of the BIOS region.

I was going to suggest forcing BIOS recovery through CTRL+HOME keys, but it looks like you'll need to program your BIOS. And yes, you can do it with the SOIC still onboard. Purchase a TL866A with adapter and SOIC8 clip and follow my BIOS construction and programming guides.

Your MB is not dead BTW.

ChrizzyReviews
02-12-2017, 11:12 PM
I flashed with ftp :/ No idea what went wrong.
Ill try with that programmer and adapter.

Do I need a complete 8mb file or just 6mb file from asus website? If yes, do u have the 8mb file?

Dreamonic
02-12-2017, 11:32 PM
I know what it's like to have it happen. Believe me. It's why I create guides on VOLTGROUND.

The G75VW/VX does seem to do it under specific conditions when flashing the system BIOS. I just haven't been able to pin-point with accuracy the root of it. IIRC, if you dump your current system BIOS with your boot mode as Legacy, and then flash one that was forced to Legacy/UEFI or vice versa, it may be the cause of the brick.

I've seen it from people on these forums just updating their stock system BIOS from one version to another, same thing happens. More related to the G75, G55 and G46 models and less on G750 and G751 models. They too have their own quirks.


If you have any questions along the way with programming, let me know and I'll do my best to answer them.

Dreamonic
02-12-2017, 11:52 PM
You only need the 6MB BIOS image off ASUS support page. The 8MB construction isn't required for this recovery unless you accidentally flash a corrupted 8MB image. In which case the BIOS, ME, GbE, DESC Regions would have to be all merged correctly according to their offsets.

ChrizzyReviews
02-13-2017, 12:06 AM
You only need the 6MB BIOS image off ASUS support page. The 8MB construction isn't required for this recovery unless you accidentally flash a corrupted 8MB image. In which case the BIOS, ME, GbE, DESC Regions would have to be all merged correctly according to their offsets.


Not fun at all but hey.. I get the chance to learn how to flash with a stand alone programmer :D
The one u recommended is a bit to expensive for me. Is this one a compartible one with the soic8 bios chip ?
http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/CH341A-24-25-Series-EEPROM-Flash-BIOS-USB-Programmer-SOIC8-Clip-On-Board-/152069847771

I flashed with the modded bios created with the provided tool, so a modded 6mb one. Hopefully the rest of the bios is intact. Could have been something wrong with the bios chip from the beginning since my kb light suddenly stoped working after a stock bios upgrade from 217 to 223.
If not, I guess I need a complete recovery dump file or similar or do I have to create it myself ? :/

Dreamonic
02-13-2017, 12:17 AM
You can use either a hex editor or UEFITool to fix the corrupted 8MB BIOS image that the programmer read, by simply replacing only the (corrupted) BIOS Region, with the one off ASUS support page.


Steps required:

Disassembly to gain access to the SOIC under the keyboard tray as you know already from your video; Disconnect battery and unplug AC adapter.

Look up datasheet for your SOIC P/N. Make sure the wire configuration is the same from the ZIF, to the adapter to the clip. Start with /CS as this will be Pin#1 indicated by the dimple on the SOIC. Proceed in counter-clockwise wiring configuration from Pin#1 (/CS) through to Pin#8 (VCC).

Then, take the ASUS 6MB BIOS image and remove the AMI Aptio capsule with UEFITool by simply right-clicking "UEFI image" and selecting "Extract as is..." and give it a different name; You can also use the hex editor by removing 0x0 ~ 0x7FF as this does the same thing.

Once that is complete it's basically detect and read the SOIC with your programmer. Save the corrupted 8MB BIOS image. Open it with UEFITool and go to: Intel image > BIOS region and right-click it, select "Replace as is..." and locate the 6MB BIOS image that you removed the AMI Aptio capsule from. Then save this image in UEFITool as your final one. Name it FIXED.bin or something.

Now open this "FIXED" image in your programmers software, leave the buffer at default settings and begin programming. Once everything is complete, remove the clip and power on your notebook and give it a few more seconds for initial POST.

Everything should be back to working order at that point!

ChrizzyReviews
02-13-2017, 12:28 AM
Ure a king!! :D Really preciate that u give out this knowledge!
Ordered the progeammer that I linked. Shouldnt take to long to arrive.

Crossing my fingers that I get it to work again since I got a pretty nice motherboard along with my old 660m that likes to be overclocked.

Dreamonic
02-13-2017, 12:30 AM
That programmer you linked will work too. If wiring isn't setup right to the clip, you can easily correct it anyway (shouldn't be necessary though).

The rest of the BIOS will be intact as the ME FW would not have been accessed. The stock BIOS locks are flagged to prevent writing to these regions EXCEPT for the BIOS region. An unlocked Descriptor region and BIOS locks disabled, you'll be able to use FPT to write to any region of the BIOS using -ME, -BIOS, -DESC, etc commands.

Not likely the SOIC to be the issue either. It's just really buggy UEFI/BIOS implementations with those particular ROG Notebooks.

After programming, if your keyboard lights still do not work, definitely take another try with the Gary Key fix again. I have used this on G75, G750 and G751 models with success. The G752 models are hit and miss and with it.

ChrizzyReviews
02-13-2017, 12:36 AM
Hopefully its saveable and easily fixed.
But if the whole bios is corrupt(unreadable by programmer), is there any chance of erasing the whole chip and start over from scratch by simple programming a whole 8mb file ?

I havent tryed Garys mod since I cant find the files.. Ive only tried slv7s keyboard fix batch files with no success.

Dreamonic
02-13-2017, 12:57 AM
If it's unreadable by the programmer, then either wires are not correct, VCC doesn't need to be used and AC adapter plugged in does. Rarely will it be so corrupted that the programmer cannot read it. Physical damage to the SOIC or pins in the clip would have to be the reason. As long as the SOIC ID can be detected, you're in the clear!

Programming is done by first erasing what's stored and writing new data back. It's not replacing (overwriting) existing values.

I'd recommend just merging the 6MB image FIRST. Definitely keep the original ME FW intact! It's just a lot quicker and simpler that way. In fact, with either UEFITool: Extract as is.. > ME region from a full 8MB dump, or with a hex editor again starting at offset 0x3000 ~ 0x1FFFFF, save it. The Descriptor region will be from 0x0 ~ 0xFFF; GbE region will be from 0x1000 ~ 0x2FFF. I usually just go from 0x0 ~ 0x2FFF right away for easier merging later. I also have these backed up for various ROG Notebooks. So in the unlikely event your ME FW or Descriptor region is lost, we can easily rebuild the full 8MB BIOS image again.


The Gary Key fix can be found either on VOLTGROUND (utilities & tools > toolkits) or here (http://forum.notebookreview.com/threads/keyboard-light-fix-gary-key.513264/).


SIDE NOTE: Even if your programmer is different, the BIOS construction remains the same.

ChrizzyReviews
02-13-2017, 02:32 PM
Just a quicky..

How do I know the correct pinout on the ribbon cable between clip adapter and the adapter circuit board ?
The cable is flat and I have no idea which is which on the black connector..
The cable in this picture..

Dreamonic
02-13-2017, 04:48 PM
Based on the programmer SOIC support, the wiring is supposed to already be in correct configuration, but it's still best to confirm it.

The red stripe on the ribbon cable is to represent Pin#1 (visual reminder). So just make sure that the connector with the red stripe is connected to Pin#1 on the 25 SPI adapter (the one that goes into the ZIF on the programmer - blue PCB). Then just make sure you remember to connect the clip to the SOIC in the exact way, starting with the red stripe being Pin#1 on the SOIC (Pin#1 indicated by the dimple on the SOIC).

Dreamonic
02-13-2017, 05:45 PM
Also to note, the 25 SPI adapter (blue PCB) has to be inserted into the ZIF socket following the same configuration as well.

Next to the ZIF in the picture above (to the right) are two SOIC pinouts, one that has "24" and another that has "25" written inside with a white dot to represent where Pin#1 is. Insert the adapter matching Pin#1 as indicated. You'll also notice there are 2 areas where your adapter can go into the ZIF socket. Using those SOIC pinouts again next to the ZIF, insert the adapter next to where it shows "25".

Don't forget to have the ZIF in the open position when inserting the adapter and closing it afterwards.

ChrizzyReviews
02-13-2017, 07:27 PM
Based on the programmer SOIC support, the wiring is supposed to already be in correct configuration, but it's still best to confirm it.

The red stripe on the ribbon cable is to represent Pin#1 (visual reminder). So just make sure that the connector with the red stripe is connected to Pin#1 on the 25 SPI adapter (the one that goes into the ZIF on the programmer - blue PCB). Then just make sure you remember to connect the clip to the SOIC in the exact way, starting with the red stripe being Pin#1 on the SOIC (Pin#1 indicated by the dimple on the SOIC).


Awesome! Seems to be easy to connect it in the right order then.
I will be using CH341A Programmer software. Allready preconfigured it with the right Manufacture and so on. Crossing my fingers that my G75 will be up n running again after the bios programming.

Seems so strange that I dont get any led indication when the ac power is connected. Does a bricked bios shut down the passthrough voltage to the motherboard ?! With my other motherboard with a bricked bios I could power it on but no post or screen power what so ever...

Dreamonic
02-14-2017, 12:25 AM
Good job getting prepared!

It depends on the state of the brick. Typically with a brick such as yours, the entire main block is corrupted, leading to the no power state after flashing. The power state of the MB and all connected to it will also have no power state as well.

Regarding your other brick in which just updating the BIOS caused it, still powering on afterwards but with no display (possibly even key command input). The BIOS update may have only re-flashed a small part of the main block instead of the entire block. This may be the root cause for some of the failed BIOS updates with ROG Notebooks; Previously stored user-configured settings.

In the second brick scenario, the boot block would still be accessible and Easy Flash Utility may have worked to force BIOS recovery through CTRL+HOME keys using the ASUS 6MB BIOS image (specific to your model) on a USB flash drive (FAT32), or in C:\ drive.

ChrizzyReviews
02-14-2017, 01:01 AM
Hopefully I can get this to work by help of your lovely guide.
Do u have any 8mb dumped file that I can practise on with the softwares stated in the guide uve written?

Well, then I can feel a bit calmer. Downloaded everything needed and also tje gary kb key fix.

When this project is done tje next one will be eGPU with a pascal card - may have to do a bit struggle with the gdc egpu dos software to get it working. Maybe we can do some sort of teamwork there? A written guide of yours and a video on youtube by me? :)
Gonna be pretty failsafe since I will have all the ability to dump bios files and do reflashes if something goes wrong.

I tryed the ctrl - home + power combo on my other motherboard, sadly it didnt work but hopefully I can get 2 motherboards working again.

Dreamonic
02-14-2017, 01:34 AM
Absolutely,

G75VW 8MB BIOS 223 here (http://voltground.com/vbioses/ASUS.G75VW.V223.8MB.CONSTRUCTED.BIOS.bin).

So as long as I have available time to problem solve with the eGPU project. That would be a great idea.

One of the joys of being able to experiment with a programmer on hand!

ChrizzyReviews
02-14-2017, 02:18 PM
Could be a fun project since no one has managed to get it qork with a G75 oldschool gamer. No need to rush with it.
You have the knowledge in bioses and programming and I have the knowedge in buying stuff and making videos/benchmarks haha..

Just quirous, is there any tweaks for boosting the i7 3210qm cpu or chipset on the G75 and for the memory? Im running CL9 1600mhz 16gb in quad channel.

UPDATE!
The usb programmer will arrive tomorrow so hopefully Im up'n'running pretty soon. I will try your vBios once again along with Gary's kb light fix.

Ive also managed to see what went wrong the last flash.
Unfortently Ive managed to flash a G55VW rom - therefore the no post state. Hopefully just a corrupt 6mb file and not the whole 8mb.

ChrizzyReviews
02-21-2017, 12:34 PM
Got the programmer today.
Read out the full 8mb file and replaced the uefi image with the one from asus website and wrote it on the chip. Everything went fine BUT, I got from a no power state to "trying" to post state now. Like a "normal" brick state.

Not sure what to do now?
Tryed to program with the file u linked but the same.

Ideas?!
I need a complete working 8mb file I think.
And a question, after reading the chip, do I need to erase it before writing the new one?


Removed the uefi 6mb from the .223 bios again and inserted it to my corrupt 8mb file and erased the bios chip and wrote the new one and voila - it's alive. So freaking happy right now.
One other good news is that me and my wife is having a baby. Tested positive today :D

Btw. Gary's kb fix worked aswell. Now on for some overclocking again ;)