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willy
03-24-2013, 02:21 AM
I was looking at some ssd's on Newegg and I was wondering which has the best performance for the money? I would love a samsung 840 pro or Ocz vector but they are a bit steep. Anybody have any experience with the corsair neutron or the samsjng 840 non pro? There's about a $60-80 difference between the first two and the second two are they worth the extra money just for everyday computing and gaming?

ogre9000
03-24-2013, 03:12 AM
I have both 840 and 840 pro SSDs. Picked up the non pro because it was 149.00 on newegg. It is now in my G75VW. The experience on both drives is almost identical. From installation to the performance that you can actually perceive with the naked eye, there are only a few workloads that you can run against them that would call out one or the other. Benchmarks, on the other hand, will tell you right away. I've had none of the BSODs described by other users on various forums across the net.
I've also used Corsair in an iMac. Not the Neutron model but I can't complain of it's performance either. All SSDs are better than the Velociraptor raid arrays I used to use (and they fit in you gaming laptop).

rewben
03-24-2013, 03:23 AM
there is a difference between consumer and performance ssd's. (i.e. speed, and of course price).

note that these are my personal preferences for now. for consumer ssd's, there are happy users of samsung 840 (250gb). other alternatives would be plextor m5s (256gb). i prefer performance ssd's especially samsung 840 pro and plextor m5p extreme. ocz vector is also fine but a bit pricey. get 240gb or more (currently the sweet spot for ssd purchases). (hm.. their prices are somewhat high at newegg; maybe you should wait for a bit for their frequent price-dropping promotions)

i have no experience on corsair neutron sorry.

tkolarik
03-24-2013, 03:49 AM
I went with Intel and got a 520 mainly because of the reliability and 5 year warranty. If you are looking at these two, I would select the pro over the non-pro. The price difference is not that bad considering the higher IOPS and 2 more years of warranty.

rewben
03-24-2013, 03:51 AM
@tkolarik, i was about to point this out. thanks!

Vicodin
03-24-2013, 04:31 AM
I have had good luck with Mushkin. Just putting that out there. My mSATA SSD has been great. No issues at all. You can get a 240gb Mushkin Chronos Deluxe SSD on newegg right now on sale for $185.00 560mbps read, 530mbps write.

SpeedyPC
03-24-2013, 05:44 AM
Yep I've got 2 Intel 520 SSD 480GB for my laptop and it comes with a 5 year warranty, mainly I go for the longest warranty and Intel is the only brand I know so far on the market provide the longest warranty and yes it can be very pricey.

willy
03-24-2013, 06:09 AM
Yeah I'm looking at the Samsung 840 and the pro model on amazon. They are $220 for pro and $170 for non pro. My only concern is with the tlc nand that the 840 uses though for my usage I'm sure it'll be fine.

whathedo69
03-24-2013, 08:19 AM
I have 2 128gb vertex 4 ssd's and I have them in raid 0 and they are great got them both for 118 after taxes and shipping got them like in 2 days of ordering them I get almost 1gb read and write speeds plus they also come with 5 year warranty got them from amazon I dnt store alot of stuff on my laptop so I dont realy need alot of space if I save anything I juat put it on my wd external 2tb 3.0 but as far as the ertex 4's I think they are great ne,t year when income tax rolls around I will upgrade to 2 512gb just for the heck of it

13fist
03-24-2013, 08:32 AM
Samsung 840. I didn't go pro because I'm cheap.
I can't say anything bad about it and if you can catch a deal like newegg had, it's even better.

Sagi
03-24-2013, 09:43 AM
I went with Intel and got a 520 mainly because of the reliability and 5 year warranty. If you are looking at these two, I would select the pro over the non-pro. The price difference is not that bad considering the higher IOPS and 2 more years of warranty.

Same here :) + I had been reading some random post about blue screens etc. and according to people INTEL was a bit more reliable.

dclanz
03-24-2013, 12:30 PM
I've got a Samsung 512GB 840 series and I cannot complain. The price was right and I made the jump, never looked back. :)

rewben
03-24-2013, 01:15 PM
it's nice to see everyone with different ssd's telling us their comments :)

fyi samsung 840 pro and plextor m5p extreme both have a 5-year warranty. i have not had problems with intel 520 and ocz vertex 4 too; but these ssd's are kind of over-priced these days.

@13fist, samsung 840 is not bad. i suggest people to take that if their usage is not that heavy. it's priced nicely for this group of users imo.

Bundy_Drop_Bear
03-24-2013, 01:42 PM
Can one of the Admins plz make a sticky on this topic and maybe update it once a month or so, so that people stop posting on this subject,seems every few days someone is asking about what's the best SSD.

Maybe a post with links to online stores, from each of the More dominant country's that forum users are from, Like Australia/The UK/US/ etc...
we do have admin from each of those country's and they should have an idea on what online sites have the best range /prices.

mostom
03-24-2013, 08:03 PM
rewben
what do you mean by heavy usage? playing games or what?

I'm asking it because my g 75 needs an SSD and at the moment i am considering samsung 840.

bignazpwns
03-24-2013, 08:16 PM
Between the two go with the pro. Because the non pro's are pretty gimped. I have used the pro and normal version and the normal version felt sluggish compared against other drives in the writes.....really sluggish kinda like a Agility 3.

Vicodin
03-24-2013, 08:20 PM
This is one reason I choose mushkin

Samsung 840 pro
$240.00
Read 540mbps/Write 520mbps

Samsung 840
$210.00
Read 530mbps/Write 240mbps

Mushkin Chronos Deluxe
$185.00
Read 560mbps/Write 520mbps

These are all around 250gb ssd's and the prices are from newegg.com
As you can see the Mushkin is a little faster than the Samsung 840 pro, and is $55.00 less

indianacarnie
03-24-2013, 08:35 PM
I switched out one of my internal spinners with a M4 Crucial and couldn't be happier. My W.E.I. went up to 7.9 with it. Cost less than $100.00 too. (128gb)

I've heard nothing but good about the Mushkin's though, and those Samsung Pro's are FAST. All and all though I've been recommending the Crucial's. Their customer support is OUTSTANDING. I had a little shipping/payment problem with them on an earlier memory purchase and they were fast and efficient with personalized (a REAL person) e-mailing me until I was satisfied.

Torr785
03-24-2013, 08:56 PM
I put an ocz Agility 60 gig (sata 3) in my old I7-920 , the x58 MB is only sata 2 . Its 18 months old now and runs great about 250/250 read/writes speeds.
Im using a Silicon power v70 240 Gig in my GS75vw and that is great, get about 510/490 read writes using Aida64.
I have used Silicon Power in a few different builds for mates V60 60 and 120gig and v70 120 gig.
Originally went for the SP due to price and availability, but now I cant fault them so I'll keep using them until they grief me.

The main use for ssd's is for the operating systems in my builds , so they do get a workout.
I havent had any failures on any ssd's mentioned.

I have also used Corsair Force with very similar results and no issues.

I think it really comes down to preference. Just check the specs , go for high IOPs and read/write speeds

bignazpwns
03-24-2013, 09:09 PM
What it all comes down to is Synchronous vs Asynchronous.


Look at drives like the Vertex's and put them against the Crucial M4's. The M4's are horribly slow in everything that matters. Just like the Agility 3's but they are cheap you get what you pay for Asynchronous drives. Now a good bang for the buck drive is the Kingston Hyper X 3K's cheap and can pump out some iop's and its the same memory as the intel 520's i dont know how they bin the 5k over 3k but its the same i checked. But it is a sandforce and like all sandforces you run the risk of a blue screen. That does not apply to the Intel 520's that use sandforce as intel has pretty much perfected the firmware.

In SSD's you get what you pay for. The only brands i buy are.

Intel
Samsung "Now only pros"
Kingston Hyper X
OCZ vertex or higher

willy
03-24-2013, 09:29 PM
Doesn't Intel and mushkin have sandforce controllers? I've heard that the uncompressed data writes are real slow. Is this something a normal user will notice?

bignazpwns
03-24-2013, 09:49 PM
Doesn't Intel and mushkin have sandforce controllers? I've heard that the uncompressed data writes are real slow. Is this something a normal user will notice?

They are but its something you wont really see. Sandforce is a great controller as long as its backed by a good firmware.

I never had any issues with my Intels all the way from X25's- the new 520's but i will say i had a Mushkin Callisto Deluxe that would get some blue screens. And really that drive was slower then the other drives i used.


Intels are great i mean they are rock solid and pretty fast in bench's as well as real world. However your paying a hefty prem. But what you get is a 5 year warranty. bulletproof firmware and a drive that's pretty much enterprise grade something that most other drives cant say.

ogre9000
03-24-2013, 10:44 PM
I've never had any BSODs with any SSDs. I did have an Intel 520 that died an early death and had to be replaced, but I don't count that against an electronics company. I'm a retired I.T. man and if I've learned anything over the last 4 decades, it's that electronics are notoriously unreliable.
I cannot stress enough that the user, right up to the 99th percentile, will not ever notice the difference between any of these drives. If you are routinely performing gigantic random writes TO an SSD, other than while benchmarking, then you need to be hit in the head with a tack hammer.
If you are looking for straight numbers, this article is very thorough. Just keep in mind, if you are currently using an HDD, any of these SSDs will blow your mind.
http://www.tweaktown.com/reviews/5197/samsung-840-pro-256gb-ssd-review/index.html

rewben
03-25-2013, 05:55 AM
rewben
what do you mean by heavy usage? playing games or what?

I'm asking it because my g 75 needs an SSD and at the moment i am considering samsung 840.

heavy usage means high disk write/erase operations, such as torrents, and daily large file transfers, install/uninstall large games very frequently.


This is one reason I choose mushkin

Samsung 840 pro
$240.00
Read 540mbps/Write 520mbps

Samsung 840
$210.00
Read 530mbps/Write 240mbps

Mushkin Chronos Deluxe
$185.00
Read 560mbps/Write 520mbps

These are all around 250gb ssd's and the prices are from newegg.com
As you can see the Mushkin is a little faster than the Samsung 840 pro, and is $55.00 less

@Vicodin, there are more parameters that you should consider: read/write speed, iops, nand flash type. those numbers are just best numbers, mainly for marketing (based on ATTO, not real life usage). normally i choose to have high iops and high reads (for OS booting, app initiating, game loading). i don't mind slow writes.


I switched out one of my internal spinners with a M4 Crucial and couldn't be happier. My W.E.I. went up to 7.9 with it. Cost less than $100.00 too. (128gb)

I've heard nothing but good about the Mushkin's though, and those Samsung Pro's are FAST. All and all though I've been recommending the Crucial's. Their customer support is OUTSTANDING. I had a little shipping/payment problem with them on an earlier memory purchase and they were fast and efficient with personalized (a REAL person) e-mailing me until I was satisfied.

crucial m4 is fine, too. it's one of the stable ssd's available. i just prefer ssd's with high reads and iops that's all.


They are but its something you wont really see. Sandforce is a great controller as long as its backed by a good firmware.

I never had any issues with my Intels all the way from X25's- the new 520's but i will say i had a Mushkin Callisto Deluxe that would get some blue screens. And really that drive was slower then the other drives i used.


Intels are great i mean they are rock solid and pretty fast in bench's as well as real world. However your paying a hefty prem. But what you get is a 5 year warranty. bulletproof firmware and a drive that's pretty much enterprise grade something that most other drives cant say.

yes the controller is the key for these drives. there are so many sandforce-based ssd's, yet there is only a few that are good imo (for instance, i have a fujitsu oem ssd, sandforce-based; compared to others, this one will have some moments of freezing upon shutdown when i run trim using 'optimize drive' in w8). however, this really doesn't mean others are bad; let's just say their controllers are less optimized.


I've never had any BSODs with any SSDs. I did have an Intel 520 that died an early death and had to be replaced, but I don't count that against an electronics company. I'm a retired I.T. man and if I've learned anything over the last 4 decades, it's that electronics are notoriously unreliable.
I cannot stress enough that the user, right up to the 99th percentile, will not ever notice the difference between any of these drives. If you are routinely performing gigantic random writes TO an SSD, other than while benchmarking, then you need to be hit in the head with a tack hammer.
If you are looking for straight numbers, this article is very thorough. Just keep in mind, if you are currently using an HDD, any of these SSDs will blow your mind.
http://www.tweaktown.com/reviews/5197/samsung-840-pro-256gb-ssd-review/index.html

this is always true. to me it's more like luck. for instance, i can throw anything into my g55; while some friends of mine sent theirs to RMA several times already and still have issues.

again, a ssd is a must-have for g-series; it's a good investment. however, your usage will determine if a particular drive will work fine for you or not.

for common usage, slower drives still work within acceptable speed imo. but if you want more speed, then go for performance ones.

steaveo1
03-26-2013, 06:16 AM
heavy usage means high disk write/erase operations, such as torrents, and daily large file transfers, install/uninstall large games very frequently.



@Vicodin, there are more parameters that you should consider: read/write speed, iops, nand flash type. those numbers are just best numbers, mainly for marketing (based on ATTO, not real life usage). normally i choose to have high iops and high reads (for OS booting, app initiating, game loading). i don't mind slow writes.



crucial m4 is fine, too. it's one of the stable ssd's available. i just prefer ssd's with high reads and iops that's all.



yes the controller is the key for these drives. there are so many sandforce-based ssd's, yet there is only a few that are good imo (for instance, i have a fujitsu oem ssd, sandforce-based; compared to others, this one will have some moments of freezing upon shutdown when i run trim using 'optimize drive' in w8). however, this really doesn't mean others are bad; let's just say their controllers are less optimized.



this is always true. to me it's more like luck. for instance, i can throw anything into my g55; while some friends of mine sent theirs to RMA several times already and still have issues.

again, a ssd is a must-have for g-series; it's a good investment. however, your usage will determine if a particular drive will work fine for you or not.

for common usage, slower drives still work within acceptable speed imo. but if you want more speed, then go for performance ones.

In my opinion, SSDs are more prone to issues than the HDDs. As rewbwn rightly says controller is the heart of any SSD. Controller designers will have tough time fighting against so many parameters like compatibility hardwares & also consistent firmware updates. Most of the major brands go through this phase and get refined.

bignazpwns
03-26-2013, 01:13 PM
In my opinion, SSDs are more prone to issues than the HDDs. As rewbwn rightly says controller is the heart of any SSD. Controller designers will have tough time fighting against so many parameters like compatibility hardwares & also consistent firmware updates. Most of the major brands go through this phase and get refined.


Thats why you go with a qualty drive and not something that you think will be fast. I never had any issues with teh Intel's but they are top of the line in terms of reliability. But you pay for that tho.

What it all bios down to is firmware. You see more problems with SF based OCZ's then Intels because intel test their firmware way way way more. Samsungs are great because they make their controller in house and also do a ton of testing. Not as much as Intel but more then the others.


All that being said i have also use Mushkin, Kingston, Plextor, Samsung, Intel, Cosair and pretty much every other brand out there. I only had issues with two drives that being a OCZ Agility 3 and a Crucial M4. But out of every brand the Intel and samsungs are the only ones i would really trust as a main drive in a system.

I have personally used 32 Intel SSD's. From the X25m's and v's to the newer 520's and never had any issues what so ever.


But i have seen more mechanical drives fail then quality SSD's. Most SSD issues are from firmware bugs.

ogre9000
03-26-2013, 05:08 PM
But i have seen more mechanical drives fail then quality SSD's. Most SSD issues are from firmware bugs.
Well I've definitely seen more mechanical drives fail, but then when I started working on computers, the tape drive was still king and the Winchester disk was a dream. I remember my first 20meg MFM hard drive (thought I would never have to buy another one).
Everyone should keep in mind that there have always been drive failures. DOAs, head crashes, controller boards failing, even had one catch fire. SSDs are the thing right now, so everyone is paying attention, but I bet if you were to only read the reviews on Newegg about HDDs, you'd find that there are a number of complaints about them as well.
After all, attached to every HDD, there is a controller board similar to the PCB in your SSD.

willy
03-27-2013, 02:20 AM
Went with the sam 840 it W's on sale and with the $10 discount for new customers I got the 250gb for $160. It was that or the neutron for the same price.. Tough decision but since I have a 1tb in the second bay the tlc nand was less of a concern and read speeds were more important than to me.

bignazpwns
03-27-2013, 12:15 PM
Went with the sam 840 it W's on sale and with the $10 discount for new customers I got the 250gb for $160. It was that or the neutron for the same price.. Tough decision but since I have a 1tb in the second bay the tlc nand was less of a concern and read speeds were more important than to me.

Please tell me you got the pro. I mean the 830 is still a better buy then the non pro. The normal 840 is just a bad drive. And here is why.

The non-Pro 840 comes with TLC NAND which has lower P/E cycles (1,000 TLC vs 3,000 MLC). TLC NAND is also slower compared to MLC NAND sequential write's really show it..

ogre9000
03-27-2013, 02:59 PM
I have two 840 pros, and one 840 non pro (which is in my G75VW right now). The non pro is fine. During normal use you cannot tell the difference and as I stated above, if you are routinely performing gigantic random writes to an SSD (which is the only time you will notice this drive being slower than the pro version), other than while benchmarking, then you need to be hit in the head with a tack hammer.
The problem with spending hundreds of dollars on "the best", is that ten minutes from now, there will be another "best" to chase after.
The sequential writes on the non pro are about half the speed of the pro version which is still very fast compared to mechanical drives.
Conservative estimates on the longevity of the non pro drive are a minimum of 7 years without over provisioning. I can say for a fact this drive will have been tossed in the bin long before that time has passed for something faster, larger, whatever. I've had far too many machines to believe that this laptop, or any item installed in it will be with me for more than a couple of years.

willy
03-27-2013, 09:37 PM
Yeah I went with the non pro because of the price and I'll have a hdd in my laptop also. The fact that I won't be writing much data to the ssd and the read speeds are similar helped me make my decision.

pixeldust
03-28-2013, 01:30 PM
I have two 840 pros, and one 840 non pro (which is in my G75VW right now). The non pro is fine. During normal use you cannot tell the difference and as I stated above, if you are routinely performing gigantic random writes to an SSD (which is the only time you will notice this drive being slower than the pro version), other than while benchmarking, then you need to be hit in the head with a tack hammer.
The problem with spending hundreds of dollars on "the best", is that ten minutes from now, there will be another "best" to chase after.
The sequential writes on the non pro are about half the speed of the pro version which is still very fast compared to mechanical drives.
Conservative estimates on the longevity of the non pro drive are a minimum of 7 years without over provisioning. I can say for a fact this drive will have been tossed in the bin long before that time has passed for something faster, larger, whatever. I've had far too many machines to believe that this laptop, or any item installed in it will be with me for more than a couple of years.





ogre9000,



"I've had far too many machines to believe that this laptop, or any item installed in it will be with me for more than a couple of years.'


Why is that?

Do you get upgradeitis every so often or does your laptops degrade or fail? :confused:

ogre9000
03-28-2013, 02:08 PM
Because I upgrade regularly. I've had very few systems just die. Some of my cases lived through 3 or 4 motherboard and cpu ugrades.
Most of my portable systems were provided by employers and customers, so when the job was done, the machine went back.
The march towards larger and faster drives, cpus, etc, has been relentless over the past 40 years. My first "laptop" had a 5" monochrome crt built into it. It's only use to me was for plugging into telco switches.
I've administered everything from Univac, Unix (all flavors), VMS, Linux, Windows, and a few proprietary builds you've never heard of.
I've used every version of Windows and MacOS from the very beginning and I've played most games from Zork 1.0 and Impossible Mission to Crysis 3.
If you want to use your system for anything other than simple office work, you will be upgrading on a regular basis. There will be some games in the very near future that this system simply will not play. If I'm still alive, and the games are worth it to me, I will be upgrading.

Is that wrong?

pixeldust
03-28-2013, 03:44 PM
Because I upgrade regularly. I've had very few systems just die. Some of my cases lived through 3 or 4 motherboard and cpu ugrades.
Most of my portable systems were provided by employers and customers, so when the job was done, the machine went back.
The march towards larger and faster drives, cpus, etc, has been relentless over the past 40 years. My first "laptop" had a 5" monochrome crt built into it. It's only use to me was for plugging into telco switches.
I've administered everything from Univac, Unix (all flavors), VMS, Linux, Windows, and a few proprietary builds you've never heard of.
I've used every version of Windows and MacOS from the very beginning and I've played most games from Zork 1.0 and Impossible Mission to Crysis 3.
If you want to use your system for anything other than simple office work, you will be upgrading on a regular basis. There will be some games in the very near future that this system simply will not play. If I'm still alive, and the games are worth it to me, I will be upgrading.

Is that wrong?



"Is that wrong?'


Nope, nothing wrong at all... Just curious!

I was not questioning the validity of your decisions or motives.

Sorry, maybe I should have worded my question in a different manner! :)

ogre9000
03-28-2013, 05:33 PM
No, it was worded fine. I took no offence. That last sentence was tongue in cheek.