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View Full Version : Is anybody using ThrottleStop?



Akki
03-26-2013, 02:13 AM
And Why?

If yes, how did u set it up?

Thanks

Enigma
03-26-2013, 04:15 AM
I think that only some versions of the G75VW have throttling, mine doesn't appear to but I'm not sure. Some ppl do still use it and it's OK but just be careful, you can cause permanent damage if you don't know what you're doing.

Akki
03-26-2013, 04:30 AM
Thanks,.. i am using it only wit default (2) gaming profile, and constantly monitor CPU and GPU temperatures.
CPU never exceed 66 and GPU 70 Celsius.

Are those temperatures safe?

Tnx

Enigma
03-26-2013, 04:40 AM
I'm no expert but that sounds well below the safe threshold. You should be fine. But it varies by machine too so you'll need to do a little research on what the max safe temps are.

gokica
03-26-2013, 08:50 AM
Throttlestop has some weird effect on the CPU. I did use it while running Prime95 and it kept the clock at 3.3 - 3.4 on all cores on my i7 3630QM but made the temperature rise to 95C. Never used it afterward. Without it the temps never went higher than 80 degrees under full stress.

So if anyone wants to try feel free but keep an eye on the temperature. Never leave the computer unattended under heavy stress when this utility is used.

TokoDude
03-26-2013, 09:36 AM
CPU will get damage at 100C
GPU will get damage at 90C

Akki
03-26-2013, 03:23 PM
Throttlestop has some weird effect on the CPU. I did use it while running Prime95 and it kept the clock at 3.3 - 3.4 on all cores on my i7 3630QM but made the temperature rise to 95C. Never used it afterward. Without it the temps never went higher than 80 degrees under full stress.

So if anyone wants to try feel free but keep an eye on the temperature. Never leave the computer unattended under heavy stress when this utility is used.


Thanks gokica - i will delete it - and as i dont see many replys here anyway, i think that it might be useless for our CPU.

BTW, did you overclock you GPU maybe? )



CPU will get damage at 100C
GPU will get damage at 90C

Thanks!

unclewebb
03-26-2013, 03:47 PM
Akki: The default ThrottleStop profiles do not do anything until a user sets them up. The Gaming profile doesn't do anything different than any of the other profiles.

ThrottleStop can not bypass thermal throttling that Intel builds into all of their CPUs at the factory. No software can bypass the throttling temperature built into Intel hardware. The maximum safe operating temperature for a 3rd Generation Core i Mobile CPU is any temperature less than 105C according to Intel. If running the CPU at this temperature was going to cause "damage", why would Intel allow their CPUs to run at this temperature? They could easily lower the thermal throttling temperature to 100C or 90C or whatever temperature they wanted to. They do not do this because their CPUs are rock solid when running at high temperatures. When going from the 2nd Generation Sandy Bridge to the 3rd Generation Ivy Bridge, Intel actually raised the throttling temperature from 100C to 105C which confirms the confidence they have in their CPUs. The thermal shut down temperature is designed to prevent long term CPU damage. Intel has set that to 130C for Ivy Bridge.

gokica: The weird effect that ThrottleStop is having on your CPU is it is letting your CPU run at its Intel rated speed. If your CPU runs hotter when using ThrottleStop, that's because your laptop manufacturer decided to use CPU throttling instead of including an adequate heatsink, fan and proper ventilation. Throttling is a far cheaper solution than proper design.

Laptop manufacturers throttle the CPU for a variety of reasons. Some manufacturers have used throttling so they could ship a power adapter that was not adequate to fully power the CPU and GPU simultaneously. Other manufacturers have used throttling because they figure that buyers would prefer to have a cool running laptop compared to a laptop that runs at its Intel rated speed. They know that most end users won't have the smarts to figure out that they have been taken advantage of. It's dishonest to bill a user for a 3630QM if the CPU can not run fully loaded at its rated speed without throttling. That's like paying for a car with a V8 and finding out that when you actually need the extra power, half the cylinders get disabled. A car buyer would never put up with that and would go back and demand a refund. Most laptop owners put up with CPU throttling because they don't know any better.

Ultimately it is your laptop so it is your call. If you don't like the choices your laptop manufacturer has made, use ThrottleStop to run your CPU at the speed and temperature that Intel rates their CPUs to run at. You didn't pay for a Dual Core or an Atom CPU so why have it running like one if you don't have to?

bignazpwns
03-26-2013, 04:12 PM
CPU will get damage at 100C
GPU will get damage at 90C


Really because the cpu tjmax is 105c at the point where it will throttle its self so it wont get damaged. The GPU also has this well over 90c. This will throttle them self's long before heat kills them and that's just a fact.


Now as for throttle stop it is 100% safe as you are operating in the limits that intel has speced as the max operating frequency. I use throttle stop and even with a stock crap paste job i never loaded higher then 78c after a good paste job i load at 65c.

Throttle stop will increase your heat across the board. idle and load. Some peoples temps can hit in the mid to upper 80's with crap paste jobs and other can stick in the 70's. If you get in the 80's it wont hurt the cpu at all its pretty much a normal load temp for the ivy bridge i7's if you look at all the laptops . Its just high for peoples taste but its fine. Right now im sitting at 3.4ghz and staying at 40c.


Now here is my recommendation.

If you use throttle stop you dont always have to lock the multi to turbo. You can lock it to the slower 3.2ghz or 3.3ghz that it uses for 4 and 2 threads, it turbos to 3.4 for single thread.

Now i recamend that load temps never go over 75c. This gives enoguht room in case you have a hot day where the load temps might only hit 80-85c that day and not in the 100c range and risk throttling or even a crash.


Also i will correct him the utility is not used under heavy stress. You are simply locking the multi to whatever you want upto its turbo. This means your system will run at that clock and not down clock its self like it normally world. Like i said my idle temps using using the system normal web and what not stays at 40-45c if i let it sit it will drop to about 32c.


What people who are new to computers think is that heat kills your components they are very wrong. CPU's and GPU's for years have had temp cut offs as well as a point when they throttle to maintain safe temps. The really killer is voltage here and unless you are volt modding or cranking up the volts outside of what they speced then you can run into some problems.


If you do it. Run prime check your load temps. If they are high and you wanna do it just repaste the heatsink. If not you can revert to stock.


Also i have throttle stop set up so when im on the battery the max my cpu will hit under full load is 1.5ghz. This helps extend battery life on my Sager since i use a XM power hog cpu and really the system can not game on the battery and if i'm on the battery its just doing ms word, internet or nextflix nothing that needs more then a 1.5ghz i7.

Akki
03-26-2013, 04:22 PM
Wow- Thanks!

Now, what do you think, even tho its our own decision( as you said:)) if we wanna do it or no - do we need (do you/not recommend) to `ThrottleStop` CPU in this laptop?

TokoDude
03-26-2013, 04:56 PM
Danger zone (high) temperatures are pretty standard due to manufactures low-level specifications of usage. Danger temps are set to downclock the component such as the CPU or GPU in order to cool the component down enough to prevent overheating

Here are temperatures for specific components when they enter the danger zone.:

CPU danger temperature is around 75-85C http://ark.intel.com/products/64899 Ur right about 105 tijection
GPU danger temperature is around 90-95C
HDD danger temperature is around 60-65C

Threshold temperatures are also pretty standard once again due to the reasons specified under the danger zone temperatures. These temperatures are the most dangerous to a system, in which permanent hardware damage can be incurred if the user does not remedy the heat issue during which time the user is experiencing temperatures within the danger zone. Systems that have a component that reaches threshold temperatures will usually crash or shutdown when the temperature peaks.

CPU threshold temperature is around 90-100C (and above)
GPU threshold temperature is around 100-105C (and above)
HDD threshold temperature is varied, but above 65C is bad

Safe temperatures are temperatures are basically any temperature below the danger zone temperatures. Even a 5C-10C difference is ok as long as it stays below the danger zone temperatures.

If it is not a new system when a it enters the danger zone, it is a red flag to do some serious cleaning of dust from the vents and fans or to be aware that you may be blocking vents on the bottom or side, which is restricting the airflow. Only use notebooks on hard, flat, clean surfaces. Never use a notebook on a lap, couch, bed, or other soft surfaces.

If it is a new notebook and it is reaching danger zone or threshold temperatures it is recommended you contact the vendor of your notebook.

TokoDude
03-26-2013, 04:56 PM
Really because the cpu tjmax is 105c at the point where it will throttle its self so it wont get damaged. The GPU also has this well over 90c. This will throttle them self's long before heat kills them and that's just a fact.


Now as for throttle stop it is 100% safe as you are operating in the limits that intel has speced as the max operating frequency. I use throttle stop and even with a stock crap paste job i never loaded higher then 78c after a good paste job i load at 65c.

Throttle stop will increase your heat across the board. idle and load. Some peoples temps can hit in the mid to upper 80's with crap paste jobs and other can stick in the 70's. If you get in the 80's it wont hurt the cpu at all its pretty much a normal load temp for the ivy bridge i7's if you look at all the laptops . Its just high for peoples taste but its fine. Right now im sitting at 3.4ghz and staying at 40c.


Now here is my recommendation.

If you use throttle stop you dont always have to lock the multi to turbo. You can lock it to the slower 3.2ghz or 3.3ghz that it uses for 4 and 2 threads, it turbos to 3.4 for single thread.

Now i recamend that load temps never go over 75c. This gives enoguht room in case you have a hot day where the load temps might only hit 80-85c that day and not in the 100c range and risk throttling or even a crash.


Also i will correct him the utility is not used under heavy stress. You are simply locking the multi to whatever you want upto its turbo. This means your system will run at that clock and not down clock its self like it normally world. Like i said my idle temps using using the system normal web and what not stays at 40-45c if i let it sit it will drop to about 32c.


What people who are new to computers think is that heat kills your components they are very wrong. CPU's and GPU's for years have had temp cut offs as well as a point when they throttle to maintain safe temps. The really killer is voltage here and unless you are volt modding or cranking up the volts outside of what they speced then you can run into some problems.


If you do it. Run prime check your load temps. If they are high and you wanna do it just repaste the heatsink. If not you can revert to stock.


Also i have throttle stop set up so when im on the battery the max my cpu will hit under full load is 1.5ghz. This helps extend battery life on my Sager since i use a XM power hog cpu and really the system can not game on the battery and if i'm on the battery its just doing ms word, internet or nextflix nothing that needs more then a 1.5ghz i7.


Danger zone (high) temperatures are pretty standard due to manufactures low-level specifications of usage. Danger temps are set to downclock the component such as the CPU or GPU in order to cool the component down enough to prevent overheating

Here are temperatures for specific components when they enter the danger zone.:

CPU danger temperature is around 75-85C http://ark.intel.com/products/64899 Ur right about 105 tijection
GPU danger temperature is around 90-95C
HDD danger temperature is around 60-65C

Threshold temperatures are also pretty standard once again due to the reasons specified under the danger zone temperatures. These temperatures are the most dangerous to a system, in which permanent hardware damage can be incurred if the user does not remedy the heat issue during which time the user is experiencing temperatures within the danger zone. Systems that have a component that reaches threshold temperatures will usually crash or shutdown when the temperature peaks.

CPU threshold temperature is around 90-100C (and above)
GPU threshold temperature is around 100-105C (and above)
HDD threshold temperature is varied, but above 65C is bad

Safe temperatures are temperatures are basically any temperature below the danger zone temperatures. Even a 5C-10C difference is ok as long as it stays below the danger zone temperatures.

If it is not a new system when a it enters the danger zone, it is a red flag to do some serious cleaning of dust from the vents and fans or to be aware that you may be blocking vents on the bottom or side, which is restricting the airflow. Only use notebooks on hard, flat, clean surfaces. Never use a notebook on a lap, couch, bed, or other soft surfaces.

If it is a new notebook and it is reaching danger zone or threshold temperatures it is recommended you contact the vendor of your notebook.

TokoDude
03-26-2013, 04:57 PM
Really because the cpu tjmax is 105c at the point where it will throttle its self so it wont get damaged. The GPU also has this well over 90c. This will throttle them self's long before heat kills them and that's just a fact.


Now as for throttle stop it is 100% safe as you are operating in the limits that intel has speced as the max operating frequency. I use throttle stop and even with a stock crap paste job i never loaded higher then 78c after a good paste job i load at 65c.

Throttle stop will increase your heat across the board. idle and load. Some peoples temps can hit in the mid to upper 80's with crap paste jobs and other can stick in the 70's. If you get in the 80's it wont hurt the cpu at all its pretty much a normal load temp for the ivy bridge i7's if you look at all the laptops . Its just high for peoples taste but its fine. Right now im sitting at 3.4ghz and staying at 40c.


Now here is my recommendation.

If you use throttle stop you dont always have to lock the multi to turbo. You can lock it to the slower 3.2ghz or 3.3ghz that it uses for 4 and 2 threads, it turbos to 3.4 for single thread.

Now i recamend that load temps never go over 75c. This gives enoguht room in case you have a hot day where the load temps might only hit 80-85c that day and not in the 100c range and risk throttling or even a crash.


Also i will correct him the utility is not used under heavy stress. You are simply locking the multi to whatever you want upto its turbo. This means your system will run at that clock and not down clock its self like it normally world. Like i said my idle temps using using the system normal web and what not stays at 40-45c if i let it sit it will drop to about 32c.


What people who are new to computers think is that heat kills your components they are very wrong. CPU's and GPU's for years have had temp cut offs as well as a point when they throttle to maintain safe temps. The really killer is voltage here and unless you are volt modding or cranking up the volts outside of what they speced then you can run into some problems.


If you do it. Run prime check your load temps. If they are high and you wanna do it just repaste the heatsink. If not you can revert to stock.


Also i have throttle stop set up so when im on the battery the max my cpu will hit under full load is 1.5ghz. This helps extend battery life on my Sager since i use a XM power hog cpu and really the system can not game on the battery and if i'm on the battery its just doing ms word, internet or nextflix nothing that needs more then a 1.5ghz i7.


Danger zone (high) temperatures are pretty standard due to manufactures low-level specifications of usage. Danger temps are set to downclock the component such as the CPU or GPU in order to cool the component down enough to prevent overheating

Here are temperatures for specific components when they enter the danger zone.:

CPU danger temperature is around 75-85C http://ark.intel.com/products/64899 Ur right about 105 tijection
GPU danger temperature is around 90-95C
HDD danger temperature is around 60-65C

Threshold temperatures are also pretty standard once again due to the reasons specified under the danger zone temperatures. These temperatures are the most dangerous to a system, in which permanent hardware damage can be incurred if the user does not remedy the heat issue during which time the user is experiencing temperatures within the danger zone. Systems that have a component that reaches threshold temperatures will usually crash or shutdown when the temperature peaks.

CPU threshold temperature is around 90-100C (and above)
GPU threshold temperature is around 100-105C (and above)
HDD threshold temperature is varied, but above 65C is bad

Safe temperatures are temperatures are basically any temperature below the danger zone temperatures. Even a 5C-10C difference is ok as long as it stays below the danger zone temperatures.

If it is not a new system when a it enters the danger zone, it is a red flag to do some serious cleaning of dust from the vents and fans or to be aware that you may be blocking vents on the bottom or side, which is restricting the airflow. Only use notebooks on hard, flat, clean surfaces. Never use a notebook on a lap, couch, bed, or other soft surfaces.

If it is a new notebook and it is reaching danger zone or threshold temperatures it is recommended you contact the vendor of your notebook.

unclewebb
03-26-2013, 06:17 PM
Where are you getting your information about these "danger zone" temperatures?

For an Intel CPU, I get my information from the datasheet.

Mobile 3rd Generation Intel® Core™ Processor Family,
Mobile Intel® Pentium® Processor Family, and
Mobile Intel® Celeron® Processor Family
Datasheet – Volume 1 of 2

http://img812.imageshack.us/img812/1630/prochot.png

For Intel Ivy Bridge mobile CPUs, the processor hot (PROCHOT) signal goes active when the peak core temperature hits 105C. Intel says that any peak core temperature below that is a "safe operating temperature".

Unfortunately there are a lot of myths out there about what is safe. Some laptop manufacturers could learn a thing or two if they took the time to read the available documentation before designing a laptop. Most throttling schemes cobbled together by laptop manufacturers are completely unnecessary. Intel CPUs do a fantastic job of looking after themselves. There is no need to set premature throttling limits. Let your CPU run as Intel designed it to run.

gokica
03-26-2013, 06:22 PM
I guess the safe CPU temperature that laptop manufacturers take in consideration is the one that will not affect the components surrounding the CPU as well.

Anyway has someone figured out a way how to make the i7 3630q run at 3.4GHz with all cores active (of course not by using throttlestop trying to override this setting)? How about "hidden" bios options?

bignazpwns
03-26-2013, 07:59 PM
Where are you getting your information about these "danger zone" temperatures?

For an Intel CPU, I get my information from the datasheet.

Mobile 3rd Generation Intel® Core™ Processor Family,
Mobile Intel® Pentium® Processor Family, and
Mobile Intel® Celeron® Processor Family
Datasheet – Volume 1 of 2

http://img812.imageshack.us/img812/1630/prochot.png

For Intel Ivy Bridge mobile CPUs, the processor hot (PROCHOT) signal goes active when the peak core temperature hits 105C. Intel says that any peak core temperature below that is a "safe operating temperature".

Unfortunately there are a lot of myths out there about what is safe. Some laptop manufacturers could learn a thing or two if they took the time to read the available documentation before designing a laptop. Most throttling schemes cobbled together by laptop manufacturers are completely unnecessary. Intel CPUs do a fantastic job of looking after themselves. There is no need to set premature throttling limits. Let your CPU run as Intel designed it to run.


Sadly most people who ues these systems dont know much about computers or that they can go pick up a data sheet.

Normal loads are anything under 105c for ivy bridge.

anything upto 85c is perfectly normal. Most people here toss around numbers never used another ivy bridge laptop. I had a Samsung Cronus 7 that would load at 95c and never had any problems.

Typicaly the average temps for mobile ivy bridge are.

Low. 65c range
Mid. 75c range
High 80c range
High due to bad paste jobs. 95c

These are normal laptops. The Chronus 7 based on size and cooling system i would class as a ultrabook "Smaller then some ultra book vaios" So 95c load for that is high others i seen typical 80-85c due to the thin system and limited cooling.


All that said. Is 95c hot for a G75 with a i7 3930qm? Yes. This looks like a heatsink that was never mounted properly and is not flat and a very bad past job. Or it could be that CPU has a high VID and that with a really bad past job puts that load temps on the turbo multi sky high. The cpu is fine its the cooling system that is the issue here. CPU's VID's will vary. Example my 3630QM here is 1.055v and i seen some as high as 1.1XX volts.


Should you try to keep your temps low? Yes should you freak out if they are high? No as long as your at least 10c off from that 105c tjmax its fine. But depending on your system you may have a cooling problem. 95c on a G75 with a 3630 unless the ambiant temp is not even close to the normal 72F that cooling system has a problem that should be looked into to.


People on these forums seem to think that they will maintain desktop temps and if they don't it will fry their system when thats not the case. The cpu, gpu will all throttle and if its to high shut down untill it reaches a safe temp long before it ever causes any damge.


On a side note who really cares about the temp of the HDD. I mean if your dumping that much heat into the system to overheat a gpu i would be more concerned about caps and other ic's on the main board as most caps are only rated for 105c if they are high end. Over heat them you can damage those they have no protection same goes with various ic's they all have a max temp you can find on the data sheets.


Also keep in mind that most electronic are baked in a over to do all the SMT soldering. Parts referred to as threw hole example bigger caps and connectors go into a wave solder machine where they run over a small wave of solder. Temps for SMT vary and will also change in the zones of the over. But anything that has to do with wave soldering your going to be looking at around 450c. And yes everything on that board is smoking hot when they come off but they are only exposed for a few second then they are cooling down but you would be surprised hot hot they are.

I started my job in a board house loading pcbs into figures and sending them into a wave soldering machine. Then moved up to SMT and now i spend my days behind a computer screen running a program called multi sim building the circuits in a virtual environment and testing them prior to working up a prototype.

But if heat concern is a issue i can work up a huge post about some components around high heat areas, what they are rated for, temps at load on the system as well as the manufacturing recommended temps for installing them.

I will also add that Asus has done Mil. Cert. on some stuff. And chances are if they do that on some all of the products carry the same testing just dont have the cert since those do cost money. I have no reason to baleave the G75VX's mainboards were not cooked in a oven under full load for anything less then 24 hours. This is very very common for electronics. at my place we would bake stuff at over 150c and load it to 100% and run that for 3-7 days then pull it out let it cool and test it. If it fails the test the production is stopped why we figure out what failed. Like i said this is very very very common.

unclewebb
03-26-2013, 08:45 PM
Anyway has someone figured out a way how to make the i7 3630q run at 3.4GHz with all cores active...

The 34 multiplier is only available when a single core is active. As soon as more cores become active, the maximum multiplier will decrease. This limit is set by Intel in hardware so it is impossible for any software to over ride this built in limit.

gokica
03-26-2013, 09:09 PM
The 34 multiplier is only available when a single core is active. As soon as more cores become active, the maximum multiplier will decrease. This limit is set by Intel in hardware so it is impossible for any software to over ride this built in limit.

OK. Thanks.

Bignaz I understand your point but who wants a laptop in which the processor works at 90-100 degrees or above.

I would not want to keep the damn thing in my lap for sure. Maybe this is why laptop manufacturers would never allow such high temps although it may be safe for the processor and the surrounding components.

Maybe even the plastic covers are resistant but still that temperature is not going to feel nice if it is present in the small laptop box.

veilside
04-02-2013, 04:41 AM
Hi guys! just need some advice using throttlestop, do i need to disable speedstep option in bios? and also disable turbo in bios?
Cuz i already tried enable/disable them with few test.
Im using g55vw with 3610qm (Stock BIOS v209), dunno if its working, this is what i did:

1) Tick Chipset Clock Mod 100%
2) Tick Set Multiplier 31/32 and turbo
3) Tick EIST
4) Tick C1E

When i turn on the multiplier,the clock jumps from 13x - 31x,and it doesnt stay at maximum like 31x (for all core to run).
Is this normal or do i need to run some software to see if it doesnt throttle or what not, can anyone give me some advice or propper guide
setting throttlestop in g55vw, that would be nice..thx in advance!