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valoisr
05-13-2013, 08:36 PM
ASUS have partitioned my SSD drive into 3 partitions. The first partition is 25Gb, has no name and is not accessible to me. Can anyone explain ??

My 2nd drive, a HDD, is 750Gb, has 2 partitions with each having 350Gb accessible. Why are 50 Gb not accessible ???

Thx

xeromist
05-13-2013, 08:56 PM
The first partition is a system restore partition.

The 750GB size is the unformatted size and based on misleading math employed by the storage industry. Every drive maker does it but the short answer is that you are already getting the full capacity of that drive.

**Also, I moved your thread to the notebook area. Even though this is mostly a general storage question the bit about the restore partition is notebook specific.**

Zygomorphic
05-14-2013, 01:16 AM
Just so you (and others) know, HDD vendors count in base-10 (like humans), while computers (and OS's such as Windows) count in base-2. The difference is in the definition of one thousand (base-0:1000, base-2:1024).
Here is the math that @xeromist was referring to:
750*(1000/1024)^3 = ~700 GB
With there being a little more than 750E9 bytes on the drive, the two 350 GB partitions sounds about right.

Nodens
05-14-2013, 01:58 AM
And storage companies are doing that for years due to marketing reasons (750 sounds much better than 700, no?). Worst part is some are choosing (or are being coerced) into adopting this. The sad truth is in this wiki article: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gigabyte

Quoting:


The term "gigabyte" is commonly used to mean either 10003 bytes or 10243 bytes. This originated as compromise technical jargon for the byte multiples that needed to be expressed by the powers of 2 but lacked a convenient name. As 1024 (210) approximates 1000 (103), roughly corresponding SI multiples, it was used for binary multiples as well. In 1998 the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) proposed standards for binary prefixes and requiring the use of gigabyte to strictly denote 10003 bytes and gibibyte to denote 10243 bytes. By the end of 2007, the IEC Standard had been adopted by the IEEE, EU, and NIST."


The truth is, like xeromist and Zygomorphic said, that there are no base 10 units when it comes to computers or electronics and this only results in legitimate consumer questions of "where did my space go"? The math is misleading as there's no space to begin with:/
Did you ever hear anyone talking about Gibibytes?

xeromist
05-14-2013, 03:30 AM
Did you ever hear anyone talking about Gibibytes?

Yes, and I think she was 2 years old. :p

Zygomorphic
05-14-2013, 10:19 AM
The truth is, like xeromist and Zygomorphic said, that there are no base 10 units when it comes to computers or electronics and this only results in legitimate consumer questions of "where did my space go"? The math is misleading as there's no space to begin with:/
Did you ever hear anyone talking about Gibibytes?

LINUX is starting to report RAM in Gibibytes. I found that interesting.

Nodens
05-14-2013, 11:00 AM
Yes, and I think she was 2 years old. :p

ROFL!


LINUX is starting to report RAM in Gibibytes. I found that interesting.

Nautilus does that with disk space I believe as well. Thing is Linux likes to adhere to standards (which is nice considering the other options) and since "Gibibyte" is being accepted and adopted by everyone as the standard, we'll slowly see Linux migrate entirely to it. Although the decision falls into each package's developers. Microsoft seems entirely indifferent about it (which seems to be the case for everything except their patents:p).

valoisr
05-14-2013, 12:54 PM
Many thanks for reading and replying !

Ray

Zygomorphic
05-15-2013, 01:56 AM
Nautilus does that with disk space I believe as well. Thing is Linux likes to adhere to standards (which is nice considering the other options) and since "Gibibyte" is being accepted and adopted by everyone as the standard, we'll slowly see Linux migrate entirely to it. Although the decision falls into each package's developers. Microsoft seems entirely indifferent about it (which seems to be the case for everything except their patents:p).

Yeah, now that you remind me, it does. I happen to also agree with your sentiment about Microsoft. They are ony fiercely protective of their patents, and their domination of the desktop market via the BIOS ("Secure Boot" == "Restricted Boot", as the Free Software Foundation calls it.) I don't like all of the lofty rhetoric that the FSF uses, but their point is still valid. The Secure Boot is not about creating a more secure environment, its about securing MS's profit margins by forcing people to continue to use Windows, when LINUX is becoming a better alternative every day. Other (LINUX) companies have showed Microsoft how they can enforce a secure signing on the Windows bootloader without recquiring for everything, and MS refused to implement it.

Initially, MS wasn't even going to allow turning off the Secure Boot system on x86, until a threat of anti-competitive business practices by a number of the LINUX companies changed MS's mind. As it is, MS is still trying to make it hard, by shipping the code turned on. If it were an option of security for businesses, then they should allow the end user to enable it, and the existing BIOS passwords can prevent the computer user from turning it off.

Nodens
05-15-2013, 02:54 AM
Well they're kinda getting desperate.. they're low on the server market, they're almost non-existent in the enterprise market, they are non-existent in the smartphone/tablet market (hence the Win 8 interface farce) all they have left is the desktop market to which they're clinging on with nails and claws via the DirectX pseudomonopoly. The gaming market is what's keeping them at the top yet they're biting the hand that feeds them as well with the Xbox (crippling a lot of PC game titles due to Xbox-PC cross development and the limited hardware capabilities of the former). Things are about to change though as Valve is not only getting into Linux as a gaming platform but they're building their own linux based pc-console type of hybrid. And MS is trying to make a move into open source (or should I say they're trying to "pull a Google"?). Did you know they've started integrating Git into Visual Studio?

http://www.hanselman.com/blog/GitSupportForVisualStudioGitTFSAndVSPutIntoContext .aspx

Now how will they get the open source community to pay for VS licenses, in order to develop free software is beyond me. I mean I use VS myself for open source..I like the IDE but I'd never buy it, if I did not need it for work, just to contribute to github projects..There are many other viable free alternatives heh

billyray520
05-15-2013, 01:16 PM
Well they're kinda getting desperate.. they're low on the server market, they're almost non-existent in the enterprise market

Why do you say that? My wife works for a large insurance company and they just upgraded to Windows 7 Enterprise. I notice my bank is still using XP, but basically I see a lot of big and small businesses using Windows (Just not Windows 8 of course)