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EpIcSnIpErZ23
07-09-2013, 04:20 PM
Hi everyone, i am wondering if asus went with the standard MXM slot this time around, instead of their custom Asus Graphics cards. I'm not going to upgrade for a while, just wondering if it is possible to upgrade without spending a bunch on an Asus Graphics card.

Thanks.

Zygomorphic
07-09-2013, 04:29 PM
From what I understand, that isn't true. ASUS is still using their custom MXM designs, in part due to the thermal and geometric constraints of their notebooks. As far as I know, the only ROG notebook that uses a standard MXM form factor is the G73JH. I wish that ASUS would go to the standard if they can, since that would allow for better user upgrades. :(

rewben
07-10-2013, 12:24 AM
From what I understand, that isn't true. ASUS is still using their custom MXM designs, in part due to the thermal and geometric constraints of their notebooks. As far as I know, the only ROG notebook that uses a standard MXM form factor is the G73JH. I wish that ASUS would go to the standard if they can, since that would allow for better user upgrades. :(

it's a pity. user upgrades are important, to me and to many others. sometimes i wonder if ASUS is the only one manufacturer that places constraints and limits to its products for one reason or another. (there is an obvious pattern if you checked out their gaming laptops: user upgradability becomes limited with each new release.)

for the most releases, i have checked many brands. none of them are placing such constraints. imo a gaming laptop is supposed to be that way; and that's what many of us need.

Zygomorphic
07-10-2013, 01:25 AM
It is, but it looks like every good quality manufacturer is doing it, because the market is leaning more towards lighter and more portable computers, rather than faster ones. :( If I had more money and more space, I would probably have an ASUS ultrabook and a desktop. That would get me the best of both worlds, especially since I could have really good cooling on the desktop (and leave it in the basement), and then remote log in to it from the laptop to keep an eye on things.

rewben
07-10-2013, 02:15 AM
It is, but it looks like every good quality manufacturer is doing it, because the market is leaning more towards lighter and more portable computers, rather than faster ones. :( If I had more money and more space, I would probably have an ASUS ultrabook and a desktop. That would get me the best of both worlds, especially since I could have really good cooling on the desktop (and leave it in the basement), and then remote log in to it from the laptop to keep an eye on things.

you're right about the trend that is moving towards lighter and more portable computers.

however, imo this trend should not apply to a gaming laptop. many well-known manufacturers do preserve the essential characteristics for gaming laptops (such as, easy access to various components for cleaning and upgrades; there is another thing that people seldom talk about: the circuits and components are built to withstand even extreme editions of cpu's, more aggressive ram timings, with capable heatsinks to dissipate heat). we are not asking much. we are just asking for what we think essential to us.

honestly, i still feel uncomfortable about soldered cpu's. when i checked the price for a i7-4800mq (up to 3.70 GHz; this is the stock cpu in an aw 17 available in my country), it's cheaper than a i7-4700hq. it's a pity i cannot run that on a g750 :/

EpIcSnIpErZ23
07-10-2013, 02:52 AM
I didn't realize the CPU is soldered in on this model. That sucks. My next gaming laptop may have to be a Clevo :'(

adamsyes
07-10-2013, 09:41 AM
that's why I didn't bother on upgrading to the g750.

g75vx has a MXM/ upgradable cpu. although the gpu has a unique form space. so putting a standard mxm card isn't ideal. unless the next g series has the same concept, then it will be upgradable