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MaYaSeVeN
10-11-2013, 06:06 AM
Asus g750jw stability test with AIDA64 for 10hr average temp CPU 92c . is it normal ? :confused:

and GPU max temp 64c. it's so good:)27733

hmscott
10-11-2013, 07:00 AM
Asus g750jw stability test with AIDA64 for 10hr average temp CPU 92c . is it normal ? :confused: and GPU max temp 64c. it's so good:)

Yes, it's normal. You don't say anything about CPU speed or XTU OC, so I am assuming you are running at stock CPU settings, and stock CPU/cache voltage offset settings.

If you don't want to OC, you can use XTU to drop the CPU/cache voltage offset, from 0 to -50mV up to -100mV which will drop temps quite a bit.

Setting negative CPU/cache offset voltage may be the most valuable tweak XTU does, as the MAX OC is only 5%, but dropping the CPU temperature extends the life of the laptop.

Here is the web site and download for current XTU 4.2.0.8
https://downloadcenter.intel.com/SearchResult.aspx?keyword=%22%22extreme+tuning+uti lity%22%22

The exact name of the settings to tune are:
Dynamic CPU Voltage Offset
Processor Cache Voltage Offset

Here is an image, just before clicking Apply

27734

Here is the default minus 50mV XTU profile
27735

Load it in to XTU and then Apply. Then re-run your AIDA64 test and see the temperature drop.

My G750JW would run with -100mV offsets for a greater CPU temperature drop, you can try that too by changing the values in the XTU Manual settings area - the voltage offsets are pop up menus with a list of voltage offsets, and there is a pop up setting menu for both CPU and Cache.

Here is the maxspeed minus 50mV XTU profile - it sets the CPU/cache core multipliers to 36x,35x,34x,34x
27736

MaYaSeVeN
10-11-2013, 01:50 PM
Yes, it's normal. You don't say anything about CPU speed or XTU OC, so I am assuming you are running at stock CPU settings, and stock CPU/cache voltage offset settings.

If you don't want to OC, you can use XTU to drop the CPU/cache voltage offset, from 0 to -50mV up to -100mV which will drop temps quite a bit.

Setting negative CPU/cache offset voltage may be the most valuable tweak XTU does, as the MAX OC is only 5%, but dropping the CPU temperature extends the life of the laptop.

Here is the web site and download for current XTU 4.2.0.8
https://downloadcenter.intel.com/SearchResult.aspx?keyword=%22%22extreme+tuning+uti lity%22%22

The exact name of the settings to tune are:
Dynamic CPU Voltage Offset
Processor Cache Voltage Offset

Here is an image, just before clicking Apply

27734

Here is the default minus 50mV XTU profile
27735

Load it in to XTU and then Apply. Then re-run your AIDA64 test and see the temperature drop.

My G750JW would run with -100mV offsets for a greater CPU temperature drop, you can try that too by changing the values in the XTU Manual settings area - the voltage offsets are pop up menus with a list of voltage offsets, and there is a pop up setting menu for both CPU and Cache.

Here is the maxspeed minus 50mV XTU profile - it sets the CPU/cache core multipliers to 36x,35x,34x,34x
27736


Wow thank you so much :D

georgealex17
10-25-2013, 12:24 PM
Hi,
I've followed your steps but it seems I can't modify anything on Manual.
My laptop is a Acer Aspire E1-571G (i5-3230M @2.60Ghz) and everything is grayed out. Moreover, I don't even get the options you listed. The following screenshot shows you exactly what I get:
28596

Is there a way to fix this?
Thank you

villiansv
10-25-2013, 01:19 PM
It may be your processor is unsupported by XTU - in general it's for enthusiast desktop processors and extreme edition mobile ones. I am not 100% sure, but I think it's only with haswell that they allowed you to modify these settings on any model (you have ivy bridge).

97 degrees max is a bit too hot in my opinion. Undervolting via XTU, as hmscott suggested, is something you should consider doing.

Note undervolting is, unlike overclocking, both perfectly safe and also arguably beneficial for the processor. The worst thing that can happen when you undervolt too much is a blue screen - at which point you reboot and up the voltage a bit. You gain lower CPU temps, which translate to longer CPU life.

Haswells seem to really like undervolting. I can both UV by -70mv AND overclock as much as XTU allows me, and it's stable. However, I don't really need the extra MHz and would rather take the lower temps. My CPU stays below 70 degrees while gaming, and 80-85ish while stress testing with the -70mv. I can probably go even lower, to -100, but I haven't bothered with testing stability at these levels.

UVing can shave off 5-6 degrees off load and peak temps easily, and is easy, safe and free to do. No reason not to :).