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btrulez
10-27-2013, 12:18 AM
Hi, I recently bought an Asus ROG G750JX-TB71 and i'm planning on popping in an 840 Pro SSD in the other free empty drive space. I'm wondering if the accessories I need to mount and install it are included with the laptop or if i need to make separate purchases.

Another thing is if the laptop includes an installation disk of windows 8 i can use to install it in the SSD once i pop it in?

reka121402
10-27-2013, 03:03 PM
I recently make the exact upgrade you are about to do yourself, 256GB 840 pro. Installation was a breeze:
1) Use Asus backtracker to clone the current HD onto a usb stick (8GB)
2) Power down, turn laptop over, pop out battery and open HDD/SDD compartment by unscrewing the small phillips screw and popping the cover off.
3) Remove old HDD and put new SSD in the other bay using the Asus provided bracket already in your laptop. HOWEVER, if you did what I did and didn't realize the extra screws needed to attach the new SSD to the drive bracket were taped to the inside of your laptop packaging box, then you probably threw it away. You will then need to remove 2 of the 4 from the HDD bracket and use those, or purchase new ones.
4) Reinstall HDD/SDD bay cover, reinstall battery, power on with usb stick inserted in the laptop.
5) let asus backtracker do it's thing.
6) Once all is finished, reinstall HDD back where it came from and power the laptop back on. Mine started from the SSD no problem, but I did need to do and extra shutdown/restart for Windows to see the HDD in the other bay (seems to be a normal issue).
7) format HDD in Windows and you're all set

btrulez
10-27-2013, 04:58 PM
crap, will a 4gb usb work? how big are these files i have to transfer over/

reka121402
10-27-2013, 08:40 PM
you need an 8GB stick. lol, you own a $1500 laptop, go spend $10 at walmart and do it right.

btrulez
10-27-2013, 09:45 PM
isn't there 2 HD/SSD compartments with 1 empty compartment when i get the laptop?

villiansv
10-27-2013, 09:55 PM
isn't there 2 HD/SSD compartments with 1 empty compartment when i get the laptop?

It depends on your particular model (TB71). Mine came with 2 500gb drives, others come with ssd + hdd combo. Some may come with one 1 drive and 1 empty bay, I don't know.

hmscott
10-27-2013, 10:07 PM
isn't there 2 HD/SSD compartments with 1 empty compartment when i get the laptop?


It depends on your particular model (TB71). Mine came with 2 500gb drives, others come with ssd + hdd combo. Some may come with one 1 drive and 1 empty bay, I don't know.

The other configuration to consider is that if you got RAID'd SSD Boot on a G750JH, your SSD's are M.2 NGFF SATA drives both in 1 bay, leaving the other bay for a standard 2.5" SATA drive.

I think that means you need to stick with Msata drives for 1 bay, and you only have 1 normal 2.5" SATA bay to work with. IDK if the dual M.2 NGFF SATA bay can be converted to a standard Sata Bay, but I don't think so...(it can't)

villiansv
10-27-2013, 10:26 PM
He has a JX though, which means no msata drives :). But yeah, you're right.

If only there was an official site/thread will all possible configurations explained by model #... relying on online retailers' descriptions is iffy.

hmscott
10-28-2013, 12:50 AM
He has a JX though, which means no M.2 NGFF SATA drives :). But yeah, you're right.
If only there was an official site/thread will all possible configurations explained by model #... relying on online retailers' descriptions is iffy.

Asus only has all the options listed for a feature category, not how they are assembled into specific models, it is frustrating.

I know that the JH dual M.2 NGFF SATA config is a bit of a gotcha for me, as I would have liked to swap in 2 full sized SATA SSD's - but I am now going to need to update the dual M.2 NGFF SATA 128's to dual 512's, and put my 512GB in another bay - instead of getting a 1TB SSD and keeping my 512GB.

I wonder if someone is going to make 1TB M.2 NGFF SATA drives? :)

Update: edited to change the incorrect msata references to what the G750 has, the M.2 NGFF SATA form factor.

SupaFaztG
05-31-2014, 12:27 AM
I recently make the exact upgrade you are about to do yourself, 256GB 840 pro. Installation was a breeze:
1) Use Asus backtracker to clone the current HD onto a usb stick (8GB)
2) Power down, turn laptop over, pop out battery and open HDD/SDD compartment by unscrewing the small phillips screw and popping the cover off.
3) Remove old HDD and put new SSD in the other bay using the Asus provided bracket already in your laptop. HOWEVER, if you did what I did and didn't realize the extra screws needed to attach the new SSD to the drive bracket were taped to the inside of your laptop packaging box, then you probably threw it away. You will then need to remove 2 of the 4 from the HDD bracket and use those, or purchase new ones.
4) Reinstall HDD/SDD bay cover, reinstall battery, power on with usb stick inserted in the laptop.
5) let asus backtracker do it's thing.
6) Once all is finished, reinstall HDD back where it came from and power the laptop back on. Mine started from the SSD no problem, but I did need to do and extra shutdown/restart for Windows to see the HDD in the other bay (seems to be a normal issue).
7) format HDD in Windows and you're all set

I am just now preparing to install a Samsung 840 EVO - 250 GB SSD into my G750 JX-TB71 and must say you make it sound SO simple with your 7 steps!

I did have a couple of quick questions, if you please could be of some assistance I'd greatly appreciate it. :o

1st...I accidentally ordered the 840 EVO DESKTOP kit rather than the NOTEBOOK/LAPTOP kit. The primary differences seem to be that you get a bracket (which I won't need) a SATA power cable, a USB 2.0 to SATA cable, along with the Samsung software disks. I would've gotten the USB 3.0 to SATA cable in the notebook kit instead. My question is, and I've looked this up but just want to make sure, the SSD's themselves though are EXACTLY THE SAME, right??? AND, looking back, I could've even just bought the single unit version with JUST the SSD and don't even need the rest - Is THAT correct?

Finally, mine came with the 750GB HDD @ 7200rpm which I'm pleased with. HOWEVER, the drive itself is divided up into a C:\ OS partition, several volumes within the partition (restore?), and then a D:\ DATA partition basically cutting the drive in 1/2 between C and D....is this the way yours was when you did your SSD install? And if so, which part did you clone? Because from the looks of what I'm seeing there's nothing there that's JUST 8GB. Which of these am I to be cloning exactly? (of the 750GB I'd say nearly 50GB is already taken.)

Any further advice on this topic, once again would be highly regarded.

Thank you!

P.S. I hope I got most of the language right here, but you get the idea of what I'm saying. Sorry about that! :)

hmscott
05-31-2014, 12:46 AM
Guys, I just wanted to point out that if you use a 16GB Flash drive, Asus Backtracker will fill up 12+GB on it. IDK why 8GB Flash drive works, I've done that too, but thought I should mention that a 16GB is preferred.

Also, if you use a 32GB Flash drive, Asus Backtracker only makes a 20GB partition on it, and also uses 12+GB. If you want some free space to store your favorite build stuff the 32GB works too.

And, get a fast USB 3.0 flash drive, even though it is going to sit there waiting for use, it really makes a big time difference creating the image on the flash drive and restoring from it - I tried a USB 2.0 drive once and it took forever to create and restore.

SupaFaztG
06-01-2014, 06:36 PM
Guys, I just wanted to point out that if you use a 16GB Flash drive, Asus Backtracker will fill up 12+GB on it. IDK why 8GB Flash drive works, I've done that too, but thought I should mention that a 16GB is preferred.

Also, if you use a 32GB Flash drive, Asus Backtracker only makes a 20GB partition on it, and also uses 12+GB. If you want some free space to store your favorite build stuff the 32GB works too.

And, get a fast USB 3.0 flash drive, even though it is going to sit there waiting for use, it really makes a big time difference creating the image on the flash drive and restoring from it - I tried a USB 2.0 drive once and it took forever to create and restore.

Hey hmscott!

Well, here I am over on this thread regarding installing my new Samsung 840 EVO 250GB SSD.

I must admit I'm a bit daunted on this whole process for a few reasons.

First let me say as to your above advice, I did buy a 16GB Kingston flash drive along with everything else in anticipation of all of this, but it is a USB 2.0. Wish I had the USB 3.0, but this is what I have unless I return this and get the 3.0. Question is, is it worth the time to return or do I just "deal" with the extra time spent doing this?

The bigger concerns are (based on my post here) getting the backup right and imaging over to the new SSD, but ALSO coming into play is my OLD LAPTOP and the data that I REALLY want from that transferred over to the NEW drives.

I have an old Gateway 160GB HDD running WinXP SP3 32-bit system with 113GB data on it that I really want on my new system as it contains EVERYTHING that I've been using and working on for over a decade now!

I have a 2 TB WD Passport 3.0 USB backup drive that I bought once again specifically to do all of this but am confused as to order of this process, and any limitations, if any, I may incur in the process. And just how to optimally do all of this...

1. Image my new 750GB HDD with Win 8 over to the new 250GB SSD
2. Once new SSD properly boots formatting the HDD.
3. Get the data from my old Win XP 160GB HDD with 113GB data over to my new G750 JX's SSD and HDD and just how to optimally do this.

ie. Transfer the data from the WinXP HDD over to the backup drive, and then transfer the data over to the new drive from that using synchronization software? Will that even work? etc...

I know this is a lot to be asking and I don't expect you or anyone else to give me a degree in computer science here, LOL, but just kinda pointing me in the right direction with a healthy guideline of just what to do in my scenario would be ENORMOUSLY helpful!

You've already been a big help to me in the RAM thread (working on getting those screenshots up "over there" too btw. :) and I do have some tech. experience, but it's been a long time since I took on anything quite like this and frankly haven't been too comfortable with my new Asus yet because I've yet to even really start, much less complete, what has become a daunting task in my mind to this point.

I have been rigorously watching YT vids, reading articles, etc...just need the proper start.

Have been looking at and downloaded the USB portable version of mucommander for example for data transfer as recommended by "Eli The Computer Guy" on YT. Opened it and it appears to be easy enough to use with the proper familiarity and purpose.

I am determined to get this all correct and be ENJOYING the fruits of my labors!

I realize this has become a lengthy post and concern.

Having said this, any and all guidance you can further show to me is GREATLY appreciated, once more hmscott.

Thanks for your time and patience with all of my questions.

hmscott
06-02-2014, 12:59 AM
Hey hmscott!

Well, here I am over on this thread regarding installing my new Samsung 840 EVO 250GB SSD.

I must admit I'm a bit daunted on this whole process for a few reasons.

First let me say as to your above advice, I did buy a 16GB Kingston flash drive along with everything else in anticipation of all of this, but it is a USB 2.0. Wish I had the USB 3.0, but this is what I have unless I return this and get the 3.0. Question is, is it worth the time to return or do I just "deal" with the extra time spent doing this?

The bigger concerns are (based on my post here) getting the backup right and imaging over to the new SSD, but ALSO coming into play is my OLD LAPTOP and the data that I REALLY want from that transferred over to the NEW drives.

I have an old Gateway 160GB HDD running WinXP SP3 32-bit system with 113GB data on it that I really want on my new system as it contains EVERYTHING that I've been using and working on for over a decade now!

I have a 2 TB WD Passport 3.0 USB backup drive that I bought once again specifically to do all of this but am confused as to order of this process, and any limitations, if any, I may incur in the process. And just how to optimally do all of this...

1. Image my new 750GB HDD with Win 8 over to the new 250GB SSD
2. Once new SSD properly boots formatting the HDD.
3. Get the data from my old Win XP 160GB HDD with 113GB data over to my new G750 JX's SSD and HDD and just how to optimally do this.

ie. Transfer the data from the WinXP HDD over to the backup drive, and then transfer the data over to the new drive from that using synchronization software? Will that even work? etc...

I know this is a lot to be asking and I don't expect you or anyone else to give me a degree in computer science here, LOL, but just kinda pointing me in the right direction with a healthy guideline of just what to do in my scenario would be ENORMOUSLY helpful!

You've already been a big help to me in the RAM thread (working on getting those screenshots up "over there" too btw. :) and I do have some tech. experience, but it's been a long time since I took on anything quite like this and frankly haven't been too comfortable with my new Asus yet because I've yet to even really start, much less complete, what has become a daunting task in my mind to this point.

I have been rigorously watching YT vids, reading articles, etc...just need the proper start.

Have been looking at and downloaded the USB portable version of mucommander for example for data transfer as recommended by "Eli The Computer Guy" on YT. Opened it and it appears to be easy enough to use with the proper familiarity and purpose.

I am determined to get this all correct and be ENJOYING the fruits of my labors!

I realize this has become a lengthy post and concern.

Having said this, any and all guidance you can further show to me is GREATLY appreciated, once more hmscott.

Thanks for your time and patience with all of my questions.

SupaFaztG, first of all, relax, it is as easy as the 7 Steps reka121402 listed, with a couple of exceptions. The 8GB => 16GB => 32GB size of the flash drive I already mentioned.

The other differences are that you don't want to do Step 6/7 - the OS on the original drive is good to preserve and keep - you don't gain a lot of disk space by blowing it away. Think of it like the media box that holds your original System Recovery DVD's, because it is :)

When you back up the recovery partition using Asus Backtracker, it isn't a 100% certainty that you won't need the original media that came with the laptop someday.

Years later when you are digging through the garage looking for the installation DVD's... the original HD are those DVD's. Even if you just image the disk with the recovery partition - that data needs to be somewhere - along with the activated program that can restore that image to something you can use. All needless complication - just keep the original disk intact, so you can put it back in Bay1 and boot from it.

You can use the original HD DATA partition if you need some free space, stick the HD in a USB 3.0 enclosure, then you can use it at high speed just as if it is in the laptop, and when you go mobile with the laptop the original HD is sitting at home safe from droppage and lossage.

Keep the Asus Backtracker Flash drive, with a copy of the Asus Backtracker software you used to make it on it, as an Archive too. That way you have 2 chances of recovery. Flash drives and disk drives die over time, but hopefully one will outlast the other.

Step 3 is a bit off; you want to put the new SSD in the same Bay1 location that held the original HDD. It will work the other way, but if you ever want to put the HD back in, you don't want it in the original boot position of Bay1, you want it in Bay2 - it is bad enough having 2 bootable OS drives in the computer, but putting it back in it's original boot position is asking for the computer to boot from it again.

Too bad you got the USB 2.0 drive, but at least you can have the joy of learning to knit, garden, or the intricacies of small engine repair - which you will have time to do while waiting for the Asus Backtracker flash drive creation and subsequent Recovery Restore to your new SSD :)

I did it myself, I didn't want to wait to get a USB 3.0 flash drive - all mine were in use / too large to dedicate to a permanent Recovery Archive Flash drive, so my first attempt was with a USB 2.0 drive... the good news is when I did get a USB 3.0 drive the SSD had a Recovery Partition I could use to make another Asus Backtracker Backup - I kept those partitions around until I could make a USB 3.0 flash backup.

Between Step 4/5, you likely want to tap ESC continually until you get the boot menu so you can select the USB Flash drive as the boot device. You shouldn't need to do it, as the G750 will fail to boot on the blank SSD, and it will find the USB drive - but not all motherboards will do that, so it is good to get into the habit of maintaining positive control over the boot process and select it manually.

Back to an earlier post, yes the kit SSD is the same drive as the standlone SSD, the transfer / mounting parts are the only difference.

There are migration programs that will attempt to put things in the right place from one OS version to another, and I have used the Microsoft Migration software in the past, and it worked fine; it got me up and running quickly on a work laptop, but for my own use I hooked up my old drive(s) in USB enclosures - or a handy adapter like you got with your SSD kit, and copied my personal data (and OS hidden preference files) over by hand. I reinstalled all my original software from scratch - and found many had updated versions for the new OS - which I wouldn't necessarily have known with the migration software.

You might want to take a few minutes to accept the fact that you might do all of this a few times - the first time might not go as expected, as your expectations might not have taken into account everything as it really resolves.

If you want to try some migration software, then go for it, that is how we learn - by trying things - and it is just as easy to restore a 2nd, 3rd, 4th time to the SSD as it was the 1st.

Again, that is why I suggest a high speed USB 3.0 flash drive - the faster it is the less you will sink into a funk realizing you need to do another restore to get things right - you will take the road leading to complete success instead of a partial "I can live with it" compromise knowing it is going to go faster than slower.

On the old system I took screen shots of the folder contents as needed, like Programs, so I had a list of what to reinstall. I also took a screen shot of Programs and Features pages so I knew what I had installed. I also made notes of what I did right and wrong on the old system, so I would do better on the next. Other things will occur to you over time, time you get if you..

If you can keep the old system going for a while, and work from a cloned copy of the drive(s) onto a USB connected drive on your new system that is best. Even a week or two later you will remember something you forgot to get from the old system, and it is nice if the old system is still easily accessible to get that stuff.

Even fancier would be to clone the drive into a VM image that you could boot on under Windows 8.1 hosted VMware / Virtualbox - but I sense that right now that would be asking a bit much of your comfort zone :)

Maybe keep the original system / drives intact for now, if you think you can work up to turning them into a bootable VM in the future.

Here is a brief article to get you started, google questions / terms from there, there are a lot of variations on how to do this posted online:
http://www.pcworld.com/article/2139983/compatibility-with-security-how-to-run-windows-xp-in-a-virtual-machine.html

That's all for now :)

SupaFaztG
06-02-2014, 01:38 PM
SupaFaztG, first of all, relax, it is as easy as the 7 Steps reka121402 listed, with a couple of exceptions. The 8GB => 16GB => 32GB size of the flash drive I already mentioned.

The other differences are that you don't want to do Step 6/7 - the OS on the original drive is good to preserve and keep - you don't gain a lot of disk space by blowing it away. Think of it like the media box that holds your original System Recovery DVD's, because it is :)

When you back up the recovery partition using Asus Backtracker, it isn't a 100% certainty that you won't need the original media that came with the laptop someday.

Years later when you are digging through the garage looking for the installation DVD's... the original HD are those DVD's. Even if you just image the disk with the recovery partition - that data needs to be somewhere - along with the activated program that can restore that image to something you can use. All needless complication - just keep the original disk intact, so you can put it back in Bay1 and boot from it.

You can use the original HD DATA partition if you need some free space, stick the HD in a USB 3.0 enclosure, then you can use it at high speed just as if it is in the laptop, and when you go mobile with the laptop the original HD is sitting at home safe from droppage and lossage.

Keep the Asus Backtracker Flash drive, with a copy of the Asus Backtracker software you used to make it on it, as an Archive too. That way you have 2 chances of recovery. Flash drives and disk drives die over time, but hopefully one will outlast the other.

Step 3 is a bit off; you want to put the new SSD in the same Bay1 location that held the original HDD. It will work the other way, but if you ever want to put the HD back in, you don't want it in the original boot position of Bay1, you want it in Bay2 - it is bad enough having 2 bootable OS drives in the computer, but putting it back in it's original boot position is asking for the computer to boot from it again.

Too bad you got the USB 2.0 drive, but at least you can have the joy of learning to knit, garden, or the intricacies of small engine repair - which you will have time to do while waiting for the Asus Backtracker flash drive creation and subsequent Recovery Restore to your new SSD :)

I did it myself, I didn't want to wait to get a USB 3.0 flash drive - all mine were in use / too large to dedicate to a permanent Recovery Archive Flash drive, so my first attempt was with a USB 2.0 drive... the good news is when I did get a USB 3.0 drive the SSD had a Recovery Partition I could use to make another Asus Backtracker Backup - I kept those partitions around until I could make a USB 3.0 flash backup.

Between Step 4/5, you likely want to tap ESC continually until you get the boot menu so you can select the USB Flash drive as the boot device. You shouldn't need to do it, as the G750 will fail to boot on the blank SSD, and it will find the USB drive - but not all motherboards will do that, so it is good to get into the habit of maintaining positive control over the boot process and select it manually.

Back to an earlier post, yes the kit SSD is the same drive as the standlone SSD, the transfer / mounting parts are the only difference.

There are migration programs that will attempt to put things in the right place from one OS version to another, and I have used the Microsoft Migration software in the past, and it worked fine; it got me up and running quickly on a work laptop, but for my own use I hooked up my old drive(s) in USB enclosures - or a handy adapter like you got with your SSD kit, and copied my personal data (and OS hidden preference files) over by hand. I reinstalled all my original software from scratch - and found many had updated versions for the new OS - which I wouldn't necessarily have known with the migration software.

You might want to take a few minutes to accept the fact that you might do all of this a few times - the first time might not go as expected, as your expectations might not have taken into account everything as it really resolves.

If you want to try some migration software, then go for it, that is how we learn - by trying things - and it is just as easy to restore a 2nd, 3rd, 4th time to the SSD as it was the 1st.

Again, that is why I suggest a high speed USB 3.0 flash drive - the faster it is the less you will sink into a funk realizing you need to do another restore to get things right - you will take the road leading to complete success instead of a partial "I can live with it" compromise knowing it is going to go faster than slower.

On the old system I took screen shots of the folder contents as needed, like Programs, so I had a list of what to reinstall. I also took a screen shot of Programs and Features pages so I knew what I had installed. I also made notes of what I did right and wrong on the old system, so I would do better on the next. Other things will occur to you over time, time you get if you..

If you can keep the old system going for a while, and work from a cloned copy of the drive(s) onto a USB connected drive on your new system that is best. Even a week or two later you will remember something you forgot to get from the old system, and it is nice if the old system is still easily accessible to get that stuff.

Even fancier would be to clone the drive into a VM image that you could boot on under Windows 8.1 hosted VMware / Virtualbox - but I sense that right now that would be asking a bit much of your comfort zone :)

Maybe keep the original system / drives intact for now, if you think you can work up to turning them into a bootable VM in the future.

Here is a brief article to get you started, google questions / terms from there, there are a lot of variations on how to do this posted online:
http://www.pcworld.com/article/2139983/compatibility-with-security-how-to-run-windows-xp-in-a-virtual-machine.html

That's all for now :)

Hello hmscott,

"....breathe....breathe...." LOL

Yes, I guess I'm letting my perfectionist ways get to me. The fact is, and as you pointed out, I need to resign myself to SOME of this process not going as expected, by my own hand.

My intention is to keep both drives in the laptop when complete having the SSD as the new boot drive and for all of my apps, etc...as this IS the purpose of an SSD in the first place. I guess keeping the second HDD "as is" isn't a bad idea either, as you state.

Is there any reason I can't just keep the HDD in the system? Just swap the bays out once the SSD is imaged?

I'll keep my questions and comments to a minimum because quite frankly I'm going to need time to go through your reply and really let it all sink in, wrap my head around all of it, read the VM article, and then move forward.

I AM going to get a USB 3.0 flash drive for this too btw as I have no inclinations of learning to knit, garden, but MAYBE small engine repair. LOL

I found this...

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B008BSIJXS/ref=gno_cart_title_2?ie=UTF8&psc=1&smid=ATVPDKIKX0DER

Apparently there are differences in read/write speeds in the USB 3.0 world too! This is a "step up" with Kingston's USB 3.0 at 70MB/s read and 30 MB/s write.

There is also this one...

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B004HC98C8/ref=ox_sc_act_title_2?ie=UTF8&psc=1&smid=A1YAK8U7QV5H1E

...which says Read 70 MByte/s, Write 20 MByte/s on the top and a contradictory Read 90 MByte/s, Write 20 MByte/s on the bottom.
*sigh*

Do you have a recommended drive for this particular task?

Anyway, you have once again given me a plethora of information and guidance and I believe it's time to start putting it to proper use.

I will surely post my hoped for triumph when complete!

You have my disposition understood to a fault! LOL

I thank you for your many words of advice and encouragement and I WILL persevere! ;)

hmscott
06-02-2014, 01:57 PM
Hello hmscott,

"....breathe....breathe...." LOL

Yes, I guess I'm letting my perfectionist ways get to me. The fact is, and as you pointed out, I need to resign myself to SOME of this process not going as expected, by my own hand.

My intention is to keep both drives in the laptop when complete having the SSD as the new boot drive and for all of my apps, etc...as this IS the purpose of an SSD in the first place. I guess keeping the second HDD "as is" isn't a bad idea either, as you state.

Is there any reason I can't just keep the HDD in the system? Just swap the bays out once the SSD is imaged?

I'll keep my questions and comments to a minimum because quite frankly I'm going to need time to go through your reply and really let it all sink in, wrap my head around all of it, read the VM article, and then move forward.

I AM going to get a USB 3.0 flash drive for this too btw as I have no inclinations of learning to knit, garden, but MAYBE small engine repair. LOL

I found this...

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B008BSIJXS/ref=gno_cart_title_2?ie=UTF8&psc=1&smid=ATVPDKIKX0DER

Apparently there are differences in read/write speeds in the USB 3.0 world too! This is a "step up" with Kingston's USB 3.0 at 70MB/s read and 30 MB/s write.

There is also this one...

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B004HC98C8/ref=ox_sc_act_title_2?ie=UTF8&psc=1&smid=A1YAK8U7QV5H1E

...which says Read 70 MByte/s, Write 20 MByte/s on the top and a contradictory Read 90 MByte/s, Write 20 MByte/s on the bottom.
*sigh*

Do you have a recommended drive for this particular task?

Anyway, you have once again given me a plethora of information and guidance and I believe it's time to start putting it to proper use.

I will surely post my hoped for triumph when complete!

You have my disposition understood to a fault! LOL

I thank you for your many words of advice and encouragement and I WILL persevere! ;)

SupaFaztG, it takes time, that is why I alerted you to the idea that maybe it will take a few times to get everything just so, but even so, it isn't tough to do it close enough the first time, so expect that. Usually you realize the improvements long after the install, and you will want to live on it for a while to collect a list of improvements for the next time.

The disk puts out lots of heat. When you feel the heat contained by the external enclosure, touching the case, you will know why it is a good idea to leave spinning drives out of the laptop.

Those USB 3.0 drives are older and very slow in terms of USB 3.0 drives out today.

One site lets you sort by read / write speed, which is helpful - write speed over 100MB/sec is what you are looking to get.

Lexar makes reasonably priced, very fast USB 3.0 drives, the P10 16GB is $38.50 and read/write is 222/118 :)
http://usb.userbenchmark.com/Lexar-JumpDrive-P10-USB-30-16GB/Rating/1477
http://www.amazon.com/Lexar-JumpDrive-Flash-Drive-LJDP10-64GCRBNA/dp/B00CG5EF5I

There are other choices and brands, sort by Write speed, size, and then choose by release date - get newer releases that are faster.

http://usb.userbenchmark.com/

SupaFaztG
06-02-2014, 05:50 PM
SupaFaztG, it takes time, that is why I alerted you to the idea that maybe it will take a few times to get everything just so, but even so, it isn't tough to do it close enough the first time, so expect that. Usually you realize the improvements long after the install, and you will want to live on it for a while to collect a list of improvements for the next time.

The disk puts out lots of heat. When you feel the heat contained by the external enclosure, touching the case, you will know why it is a good idea to leave spinning drives out of the laptop.

Those USB 3.0 drives are older and very slow in terms of USB 3.0 drives out today.

One site lets you sort by read / write speed, which is helpful - write speed over 100MB/sec is what you are looking to get.

Lexar makes reasonably priced, very fast USB 3.0 drives, the P10 16GB is $38.50 and read/write is 222/118 :)
http://usb.userbenchmark.com/Lexar-JumpDrive-P10-USB-30-16GB/Rating/1477
http://www.amazon.com/Lexar-JumpDrive-Flash-Drive-LJDP10-64GCRBNA/dp/B00CG5EF5I

There are other choices and brands, sort by Write speed, size, and then choose by release date - get newer releases that are faster.

http://usb.userbenchmark.com/

Sounds great!

All of your support has been very helpful and in building my knowledge and confidence.

I will "give back" here to others as you do when I've experienced some successes and "pay it forward".

I've literally saved all you've said, and with all of the links in a .doc for my reference.

And I like the idea and reasoning behind the external enclosure.

You've been great!

Many thanks!

SupaFaztG
06-07-2014, 01:39 PM
SupaFaztG, it takes time, that is why I alerted you to the idea that maybe it will take a few times to get everything just so, but even so, it isn't tough to do it close enough the first time, so expect that. Usually you realize the improvements long after the install, and you will want to live on it for a while to collect a list of improvements for the next time.

The disk puts out lots of heat. When you feel the heat contained by the external enclosure, touching the case, you will know why it is a good idea to leave spinning drives out of the laptop.

Those USB 3.0 drives are older and very slow in terms of USB 3.0 drives out today.

One site lets you sort by read / write speed, which is helpful - write speed over 100MB/sec is what you are looking to get.

Lexar makes reasonably priced, very fast USB 3.0 drives, the P10 16GB is $38.50 and read/write is 222/118 :)
http://usb.userbenchmark.com/Lexar-JumpDrive-P10-USB-30-16GB/Rating/1477
http://www.amazon.com/Lexar-JumpDrive-Flash-Drive-LJDP10-64GCRBNA/dp/B00CG5EF5I

There are other choices and brands, sort by Write speed, size, and then choose by release date - get newer releases that are faster.

http://usb.userbenchmark.com/

Hey hmscott!

Well, after going to Bestbuy and them not having anything decent regarding appropriate USB 3.0 thumbdrives I ended up buying this drive online last night for my Backtracker process and storage thereof...

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00DZPUOTE/ref=oh_details_o00_s00_i00?ie=UTF8&psc=1

For a grand total of $22.95 incl S&H seemed like a pretty good deal to me.

I definitely jumped in with both feet in this whole process and more than a bit ambitious after buying my new Asus G750 JX-TB71 and wanting to upgrade everything right out of the gate, but I figure once its all finally complete I'll be glad I did.

I'm taking the time to read and learn all I can in the interim and just being patient at this point until the flash drive gets here in a few days and I can finally move forward.

P.S. Still working on that screenshot SPD snippet from CPU-Z regarding the RAM upgrade. I won't even go into why that's delayed but suffice to say I'll have that up shortly in the RAM thread and see where to go from there.

Thanks!

SupaFaztG
06-12-2014, 10:05 PM
SupaFaztG, first of all, relax, it is as easy as the 7 Steps reka121402 listed, with a couple of exceptions. The 8GB => 16GB => 32GB size of the flash drive I already mentioned.

The other differences are that you don't want to do Step 6/7 - the OS on the original drive is good to preserve and keep - you don't gain a lot of disk space by blowing it away. Think of it like the media box that holds your original System Recovery DVD's, because it is :)

When you back up the recovery partition using Asus Backtracker, it isn't a 100% certainty that you won't need the original media that came with the laptop someday.

Years later when you are digging through the garage looking for the installation DVD's... the original HD are those DVD's. Even if you just image the disk with the recovery partition - that data needs to be somewhere - along with the activated program that can restore that image to something you can use. All needless complication - just keep the original disk intact, so you can put it back in Bay1 and boot from it.

You can use the original HD DATA partition if you need some free space, stick the HD in a USB 3.0 enclosure, then you can use it at high speed just as if it is in the laptop, and when you go mobile with the laptop the original HD is sitting at home safe from droppage and lossage.

Keep the Asus Backtracker Flash drive, with a copy of the Asus Backtracker software you used to make it on it, as an Archive too. That way you have 2 chances of recovery. Flash drives and disk drives die over time, but hopefully one will outlast the other.

Step 3 is a bit off; you want to put the new SSD in the same Bay1 location that held the original HDD. It will work the other way, but if you ever want to put the HD back in, you don't want it in the original boot position of Bay1, you want it in Bay2 - it is bad enough having 2 bootable OS drives in the computer, but putting it back in it's original boot position is asking for the computer to boot from it again.

Too bad you got the USB 2.0 drive, but at least you can have the joy of learning to knit, garden, or the intricacies of small engine repair - which you will have time to do while waiting for the Asus Backtracker flash drive creation and subsequent Recovery Restore to your new SSD :)

I did it myself, I didn't want to wait to get a USB 3.0 flash drive - all mine were in use / too large to dedicate to a permanent Recovery Archive Flash drive, so my first attempt was with a USB 2.0 drive... the good news is when I did get a USB 3.0 drive the SSD had a Recovery Partition I could use to make another Asus Backtracker Backup - I kept those partitions around until I could make a USB 3.0 flash backup.

Between Step 4/5, you likely want to tap ESC continually until you get the boot menu so you can select the USB Flash drive as the boot device. You shouldn't need to do it, as the G750 will fail to boot on the blank SSD, and it will find the USB drive - but not all motherboards will do that, so it is good to get into the habit of maintaining positive control over the boot process and select it manually.

Back to an earlier post, yes the kit SSD is the same drive as the standlone SSD, the transfer / mounting parts are the only difference.

There are migration programs that will attempt to put things in the right place from one OS version to another, and I have used the Microsoft Migration software in the past, and it worked fine; it got me up and running quickly on a work laptop, but for my own use I hooked up my old drive(s) in USB enclosures - or a handy adapter like you got with your SSD kit, and copied my personal data (and OS hidden preference files) over by hand. I reinstalled all my original software from scratch - and found many had updated versions for the new OS - which I wouldn't necessarily have known with the migration software.

You might want to take a few minutes to accept the fact that you might do all of this a few times - the first time might not go as expected, as your expectations might not have taken into account everything as it really resolves.

If you want to try some migration software, then go for it, that is how we learn - by trying things - and it is just as easy to restore a 2nd, 3rd, 4th time to the SSD as it was the 1st.

Again, that is why I suggest a high speed USB 3.0 flash drive - the faster it is the less you will sink into a funk realizing you need to do another restore to get things right - you will take the road leading to complete success instead of a partial "I can live with it" compromise knowing it is going to go faster than slower.

On the old system I took screen shots of the folder contents as needed, like Programs, so I had a list of what to reinstall. I also took a screen shot of Programs and Features pages so I knew what I had installed. I also made notes of what I did right and wrong on the old system, so I would do better on the next. Other things will occur to you over time, time you get if you..

If you can keep the old system going for a while, and work from a cloned copy of the drive(s) onto a USB connected drive on your new system that is best. Even a week or two later you will remember something you forgot to get from the old system, and it is nice if the old system is still easily accessible to get that stuff.

Even fancier would be to clone the drive into a VM image that you could boot on under Windows 8.1 hosted VMware / Virtualbox - but I sense that right now that would be asking a bit much of your comfort zone :)

Maybe keep the original system / drives intact for now, if you think you can work up to turning them into a bootable VM in the future.

Here is a brief article to get you started, google questions / terms from there, there are a lot of variations on how to do this posted online:
http://www.pcworld.com/article/2139983/compatibility-with-security-how-to-run-windows-xp-in-a-virtual-machine.html

That's all for now :)

Hello again hmscott!

I finally put up my RAM screenshots up in the other thread and thank you for your advice there...

You've already given me SO MUCH here I'm making some progress. (had to wait for the USB 3.0 Sandisk Extreme I bought on Amazon. Mentioned it in the RAM thread.)

I just wanted to know your thoughts on installing IRST, making sure I have Trim, and any other important BIOS settings, CMS on/off? etc...before I image the new EVO 840 SSD.

Here's a screenshot of the 750GB HDD as it sits right now...

37560


Should I also use Backtracker to "Back up ASUS Driver/App"? then there's the "System Recovery" feature for system settings...does Backtracker stay on the HDD after I made the image to USB? And would it be useful to have on the new SSD?

I hope these questions don't sound TOO stupid. :o:confused: Again, you've already given me a lot to work with and I REALLY am grateful and AM coming along.

I just want to make sure I do everything I'm supposed to do BEFORE I image the new SSD and take the HDD out of the Boot bay #1, you know?

Thanks again!

hmscott
06-13-2014, 01:10 AM
Hello again hmscott!
I finally put up my RAM screenshots up in the other thread and thank you for your advice there...
You've already given me SO MUCH here I'm making some progress. (had to wait for the USB 3.0 Sandisk Extreme I bought on Amazon. Mentioned it in the RAM thread.)
I just wanted to know your thoughts on installing IRST, making sure I have Trim, and any other important BIOS settings, CMS on/off? etc...before I image the new EVO 840 SSD.

Here's a screenshot of the 750GB HDD as it sits right now...

Should I also use Backtracker to "Back up ASUS Driver/App"? then there's the "System Recovery" feature for system settings...does Backtracker stay on the HDD after I made the image to USB? And would it be useful to have on the new SSD?

I hope these questions don't sound TOO stupid. :o:confused: Again, you've already given me a lot to work with and I REALLY am grateful and AM coming along.

I just want to make sure I do everything I'm supposed to do BEFORE I image the new SSD and take the HDD out of the Boot bay #1, you know?

Thanks again!

SupaFaztG, you don't need to make any BIOS changes, leave the boot options at defaults, since you are doing a restore from the Asus Backtracker it will restore with the same options to the SSD as were on the HD, a GPT partition with UEFI security.

TRIM is there by default. With an SSD RAID setup you have to tickle Windows to recognize it as an SSD instead of an HD, but you don't need to worry about that.

Use all the backup options with Asus Backtracker, it makes sense to take it all, because you want to recreate the same layout on the SSD with the same files / etc. After your restore is done, you can merge partitions and make a large C partition / D partition, but for now, don't worry about it.

Preserve your original HD partitions and files for a while, or forever, just in case the flash drive disappears / fails / gets reused for another purpose - you can always use the DATA partition on the HD for storing/archiving - just leave the boot partitions / recovery partitions as they are for emergency use - you could always swap it back in to the laptop - pulling the SSD - should you need to send in the laptop for repair.

Have fun :)

SupaFaztG
06-13-2014, 04:32 PM
SupaFaztG, you don't need to make any BIOS changes, leave the boot options at defaults, since you are doing a restore from the Asus Backtracker it will restore with the same options to the SSD as were on the HD, a GPT partition with UEFI security.

TRIM is there by default. With an SSD RAID setup you have to tickle Windows to recognize it as an SSD instead of an HD, but you don't need to worry about that.

Use all the backup options with Asus Backtracker, it makes sense to take it all, because you want to recreate the same layout on the SSD with the same files / etc. After your restore is done, you can merge partitions and make a large C partition / D partition, but for now, don't worry about it.

Preserve your original HD partitions and files for a while, or forever, just in case the flash drive disappears / fails / gets reused for another purpose - you can always use the DATA partition on the HD for storing/archiving - just leave the boot partitions / recovery partitions as they are for emergency use - you could always swap it back in to the laptop - pulling the SSD - should you need to send in the laptop for repair.

Have fun :)

Ahhhhh....OK

I've been patient with getting the right hardware and not making too many moves without verifying important things first.

As I've said before, thanks very much for all of your guidance and expertise.

The only other thing is do I update all the windows updates before I do the Backtracker drivers/apps backup on the HDD? Or do I do them at all on the HDD? Or does it not matter?

Excellent then!

I'll re-post when all's said and done just to show.

Maybe it'll help others too to see the end result.

Great!

rognoobie
06-13-2014, 05:23 PM
I have recently purchased the 750JX as well , had no idea how to install the SSD (256 GB) , so i asked the retailer to do it for me ...He did it , and I must say , even the most resource hungry apps run really smoothly ..I have not used the laptop much though (Keeping it mainly for compiling C code and android dev) ..


Preserve your original HD partitions and files for a while, or forever, just in case the flash drive disappears / fails / gets reused for another purpose - you can always use the DATA partition on the HD for storing/archiving - just leave the boot partitions / recovery partitions as they are for emergency use - you could always swap it back in to the laptop - pulling the SSD - should you need to send in the laptop for repair.

That is how mine is setup as well , the HDD that was removed when putting in the SSD has my windows installation and everything else . I love this beast of a laptop ,never heats , is smooth and looks really cool ..

SupaFaztG
06-13-2014, 07:09 PM
I have recently purchased the 750JX as well , had no idea how to install the SSD (256 GB) , so i asked the retailer to do it for me ...He did it , and I must say , even the most resource hungry apps run really smoothly ..I have not used the laptop much though (Keeping it mainly for compiling C code and android dev) ..



That is how mine is setup as well , the HDD that was removed when putting in the SSD has my windows installation and everything else . I love this beast of a laptop ,never heats , is smooth and looks really cool ..

Sounds Awesome!

Getting mine to that point.

Out of curiosity, about how much they charging for that kind of thing where you're at?

Good for you!

SupaFaztG
06-14-2014, 11:00 PM
SupaFaztG, you don't need to make any BIOS changes, leave the boot options at defaults, since you are doing a restore from the Asus Backtracker it will restore with the same options to the SSD as were on the HD, a GPT partition with UEFI security.

TRIM is there by default. With an SSD RAID setup you have to tickle Windows to recognize it as an SSD instead of an HD, but you don't need to worry about that.

Use all the backup options with Asus Backtracker, it makes sense to take it all, because you want to recreate the same layout on the SSD with the same files / etc. After your restore is done, you can merge partitions and make a large C partition / D partition, but for now, don't worry about it.

Preserve your original HD partitions and files for a while, or forever, just in case the flash drive disappears / fails / gets reused for another purpose - you can always use the DATA partition on the HD for storing/archiving - just leave the boot partitions / recovery partitions as they are for emergency use - you could always swap it back in to the laptop - pulling the SSD - should you need to send in the laptop for repair.

Have fun :)

So I finally got the SSD in as you told me, and ran Backtracker and everything went perfectly with the imaging!...

37711

My Windows Experience Index from the HDD to the SSD went from 5.9 to 8.1 instantly! YES! And my overall went from 5.9 to 7.5! Pretty happy with that. The GeForce Experience updates should bump the 7.5's a notch or two, hopefully. Otherwise, I'm real happy!

37717

I plan on just deleting DATA (D:) and extending OS (C:) and getting nearly 170GB to use. Man, 70GB of space (50GB without the recovery partition) is a lot to "lose", but I can deal with it.

BUT......I have a few more concerns at this point and then should be good to go for the long haul!....please. :rolleyes:

First, Windows called for 96 updates, which was expected, they installed, and then configured, and then Windows gave me a failure message, and then said reverting changes, then somehow ending up taking about 6GB of drive space. :confused:

From what I've gathered, the pre-installed McAfee is "handling" Windows Updates? When I went into Windows Updates it wouldn't allow me to change any of the network settings. ie. Public, Private. There were 2 red X's on both and wouldn't respond when I clicked on it. Is there any way to "bypass" McAfee as a whole?

I ran another scan and McAfee now found 83 updates and trying to install from it now....so we'll see.

For the long term I can't stand McAfee and want to get rid of it but heard its a major pain to get it ALL out of the system. Any advice on how to do that?

I'm looking to go with Bitdefender instead, but at least need to get my updates installed first!

Next, I know you don't prefer this, and neither do I, but I'm trying to keep things as simple as possible for myself...I want to put the HDD back in the system in Bay#1 and just use it for DATA storage and not boot to it. As long as it's not the boot drive I should be fine, right?

I'm not going to mess with any of the Recovery partitions at all. But am looking to just leave the "old" OS (C:) and DATA (D:) drives intact even (not deleting, and extending) but just rename them something like Data 1 and Data 2, or something.

Should I be doing ANY kind of configuring of the new SSD to enhance the EVO's performance, settings etc. with Samsung Magician? Or install IRST from the Samsung download page, or is it already running?

Finally, in your opinion what is the best way to store data in general? Just keep apps on the SSD and store everything else on the HDD? And if so, do I change the paths from my Library over to the HDD? Or do I got this all off?

I'm almost there hmscott, and it's primarily because of you.

Believe me, you've helped me out IMMENSELY! I just have these few final hurdles I could really use a hand with.

Thank you again for all your support hmscott!

I'm doing real well with all of it as a whole! :D

hmscott
06-14-2014, 11:24 PM
So I finally got the SSD in as you told me, and ran Backtracker and everything went perfectly with the imaging!...Believe me, you've helped me out IMMENSELY! I just have these few final hurdles I could really use a hand with.
...
Thank you again for all your support hmscott!

I'm doing real well with all of it as a whole! :D

SupaFaztG, awesome! :)

Sorry, I didn't know about McAfee inserting itself in Windows Updates and messing things up... I always uninstall McAfee first thing, so I hadn't seen that before, and noone else has reported it... so yes, dump McAfee, reboot, and try Windows Updates again.

I have used Bitdefender, anti-virus and highest level firewall product, it's been a while so I don't recall the naming. I used Bitdefender for a year + while Norton cleaned up their software.

Now NIS/360 is the least intrusive on the system resources, and I haven't had a problem since. I have recommended NIS and 360 for a number of years now... and you can google Norton Internet Security 90 day for free evaluation (360 and Norton Anti-virus too).

If you game from the HD, you will want to install / use quiethdd - enabling it before each gaming session between boots. Or, dump the HD and replace it with another SSD :)

The Samsung Magician software is useful, and although I don't have it load at boot time, I use it as a quick path to setting Windows optimizations - turning off features / services mostly, and you can force an optimization too - and track throughput on READ/WRITE over time to see if speed degrades - it doesn't :)

On my G750JH I have uninstalled Samsung Magician because it doesn't like the RAID controller, it won't do a number of functions on my 840 Pro 512GB, but it will all the system changes, so I used it for that and then uninstalled it.

I also use Raxxco Perfectdisk to optimize.

I don't think the RAPID ram caching option, in the newer Magician helps actual performance, and it gives a false impression of speed, the real test is the one run without it enabled, but you can play with it and see if it helps.

Windows caches files in RAM already, so RAPID will actually slow performance as a double ram cache. I think it is just a ploy to show big numbers to distract how the Evo is slower than the 840/Pro's... not a bad thing, and perception is important and huge RAM cache induced performance numbers do perceive better than the actual throughput :)

A closer look at RAPID DRAM caching on the Samsung 840 EVO SSD - A RAM disk for your SSD
http://techreport.com/review/25282/a-closer-look-at-rapid-dram-caching-on-the-samsung-840-evo-ssd

"...There was essentially no difference between the EVO's standard and RAPID configs in our usual level load tests. We repeated the tests five times with the RAPID config, providing ample opportunity for the software to pick up on the repetitive access pattern. The later runs weren't consistently faster than the earlier ones, though."

Glad you are having fun :)

SupaFaztG
06-15-2014, 02:41 AM
SupaFaztG, awesome! :)

Sorry, I didn't know about McAfee inserting itself in Windows Updates and messing things up... I always uninstall McAfee first thing, so I hadn't seen that before, and noone else has reported it... so yes, dump McAfee, reboot, and try Windows Updates again.

I have used Bitdefender, anti-virus and highest level firewall product, it's been a while so I don't recall the naming. I used Bitdefender for a year + while Norton cleaned up their software.

Now NIS/360 is the least intrusive on the system resources, and I haven't had a problem since. I have recommended NIS and 360 for a number of years now... and you can google Norton Internet Security 90 day for free evaluation (360 and Norton Anti-virus too).

If you game from the HD, you will want to install / use quiethdd - enabling it before each gaming session between boots. Or, dump the HD and replace it with another SSD :)

The Samsung Magician software is useful, and although I don't have it load at boot time, I use it as a quick path to setting Windows optimizations - turning off features / services mostly, and you can force an optimization too - and track throughput on READ/WRITE over time to see if speed degrades - it doesn't :)

On my G750JH I have uninstalled Samsung Magician because it doesn't like the RAID controller, it won't do a number of functions on my 840 Pro 512GB, but it will all the system changes, so I used it for that and then uninstalled it.

I also use Raxxco Perfectdisk to optimize.

I don't think the RAPID ram caching option, in the newer Magician helps actual performance, and it gives a false impression of speed, the real test is the one run without it enabled, but you can play with it and see if it helps.

Windows caches files in RAM already, so RAPID will actually slow performance as a double ram cache. I think it is just a ploy to show big numbers to distract how the Evo is slower than the 840/Pro's... not a bad thing, and perception is important and huge RAM cache induced performance numbers do perceive better than the actual throughput :)

A closer look at RAPID DRAM caching on the Samsung 840 EVO SSD - A RAM disk for your SSD
http://techreport.com/review/25282/a-closer-look-at-rapid-dram-caching-on-the-samsung-840-evo-ssd

"...There was essentially no difference between the EVO's standard and RAPID configs in our usual level load tests. We repeated the tests five times with the RAPID config, providing ample opportunity for the software to pick up on the repetitive access pattern. The later runs weren't consistently faster than the earlier ones, though."

Glad you are having fun :)

Hey hmscott!

Thanks again man!

Yeah, I finally caved in and found that McAfee "scan" scans for BOTH its own updates AND Windows and is set that way by default with the factory install. I'd NEVER seen that. Imagine that BS?! LOL

As far as the actual Win updates, it started by saying 96, and then when all was said and done it was over 160! About 1/2 were dated as installed on 5/1/13 viewed in "Remove Programs". HUH??!!

So after the updates were FINALLY done I had about 10GB LESS space on my C: drive than before and I'm still confused as to the 5/1/13 dates.

All in all, with all of the bloatware, recovery partitions, updates, etc...without so much as installing a single app yet (Oh wait, Adobe Reader installed. :) about 92GB of my 250GB SSD is already taken!

IS THAT NORMAL?!?!

Excellent info on the Win caching! I'd read that and forgot! Haha! So great to hear about not really needing to do much else with IRST, etc...I'll install Magician and at least take a look.

My next task will be to merge C: and D:...I'll have to figure that out with the apps you've rec....so I can have at least about 158GB on a single drive.

Thanks for that! :)

You've been a really good and patient person with me and it's much appreciated, once again I can't thank you enough!

Well, don't want to wear out my welcome (sure I'm close. LOL) but if you feel like saying anything about 92GB of space being taken up that I mentioned and those old dates, great.

Something funny...I'd put in my password and forgot to push the numbers lock when I made it, so for like a 1/2 hour I kept trying to log in to no avail until I finally realized when it got to me actually looking at my fingers pushing the keys AND the screen AT THE SAME TIME that the number digits were never keyed in! LMAO! (I hope you appreciate such a newb mistake like this!)

Anyway, long day....take care. :o

hmscott
06-15-2014, 03:12 AM
Hey hmscott!

Thanks again man!
...
Anyway, long day....take care. :o

SupaFaztG, I removed partitions and merged my 2 x 128GB (256GB), and have a 237GB volume with 137GB free - I install a lot of stuff on the D drive - Samsung 840 Pro 512GB SSD so I can offload the C drive.

Games, VM's, development tools, ISO archive, long term saved Downloads, etc all go on the D drive SSD.

I last tested booting on the Samsung 512GB SSD instead of the RAID0, so it still has the restore partitions, so you can see the before and after partitioning:

37724

Have fun :)

SupaFaztG
06-16-2014, 05:05 PM
SupaFaztG, I removed partitions and merged my 2 x 128GB (256GB), and have a 237GB volume with 137GB free - I install a lot of stuff on the D drive - Samsung 840 Pro 512GB SSD so I can offload the C drive.

Games, VM's, development tools, ISO archive, long term saved Downloads, etc all go on the D drive SSD.

I last tested booting on the Samsung 512GB SSD instead of the RAID0, so it still has the restore partitions, so you can see the before and after partitioning:

37724

Have fun :)

Awesome!

Thanks for the screenshot, it's very helpful.

It was awkward with 38GB on C: and 118GB all free on D: so I deleted the D: partition and extended C: so now I have 158GB on just C:. :) Much better.

Yeah so what to save and where, check. Because I am gonna put the HDD back in and "see" for data storage.

Other than that, I know you spoke of this but re: Magician is there ANYTHING worth really doing with that vs. the Windows stock disk drivers and management that was installed?

Also, the firmare updates for the SSD on the Asus downloads page for the SSD?
The motherboard and BIOS too for that matter?

http://www.samsung.com/global/business/semiconductor/samsungssd/downloads.html

Anything here worth doing before I get too comfortable with "just settling" as you so intelligently and insightfully pointed out previous?

It's just that I've read SO MUCH tech stuff I'm dizzy with what I should do, what I could do, and what I really NEED to do, you know?

At least am writing this ON my JX finally! LOL

Thanks!

Darnassus
06-16-2014, 05:12 PM
hmscott have you ever came to the thought of writing stories or role playing as a hobby? ;x <3

What the hellfire just happened on Page 2?

hmscott
06-17-2014, 06:49 AM
Awesome!

Thanks for the screenshot, it's very helpful.

It was awkward with 38GB on C: and 118GB all free on D: so I deleted the D: partition and extended C: so now I have 158GB on just C:. :) Much better.

Yeah so what to save and where, check. Because I am gonna put the HDD back in and "see" for data storage.

Other than that, I know you spoke of this but re: Magician is there ANYTHING worth really doing with that vs. the Windows stock disk drivers and management that was installed?

Also, the firmare updates for the SSD on the Asus downloads page for the SSD?
The motherboard and BIOS too for that matter?

http://www.samsung.com/global/business/semiconductor/samsungssd/downloads.html

Anything here worth doing before I get too comfortable with "just settling" as you so intelligently and insightfully pointed out previous?

It's just that I've read SO MUCH tech stuff I'm dizzy with what I should do, what I could do, and what I really NEED to do, you know?

At least am writing this ON my JX finally! LOL

Thanks!

SupaFaztG, sounds good, you have made good progress, and relaxing for a bit and taking it all in is a good move. Doing too much before you are ready can get you in a position that needs time consuming reversal.

Magician is good, I would use it if my JH supported it, but the RAID controller causes Magician to not allow management of the 840 Pro 512GB, but as you note, if you know what you are doing, you can make the tweaks and changes on your own.

Firmware updates are the other thing that Magician is required to accomplish, so you can do the firmware updates then uninstall Magician.

Have fun :)

SupaFaztG
06-19-2014, 07:37 PM
SupaFaztG, sounds good, you have made good progress, and relaxing for a bit and taking it all in is a good move. Doing too much before you are ready can get you in a position that needs time consuming reversal.

Magician is good, I would use it if my JH supported it, but the RAID controller causes Magician to not allow management of the 840 Pro 512GB, but as you note, if you know what you are doing, you can make the tweaks and changes on your own.

Firmware updates are the other thing that Magician is required to accomplish, so you can do the firmware updates then uninstall Magician.

Have fun :)

Hey Thanks again!

Was away a couple of days...yeah, don't want to get too comfortable and get too much on the drive before "finalizing" everything.

I was asking because there were all kinds of cautions about flashing the BIOS and read about people having problems booting up after the fact etc...

But I've downloaded basically that whole link I posted to the Samsung downloads page and am reading through all of the "White Paper" pdf's trying to learn some more so...

and yes, thank for pointing out that Magician is REQUIRED to use the firmware update, I saw that. I don't think I have any need for the iso file that's available also, but downloaded along with the zipped update folder just in case.

Now it's really on to a small break, and then moving into backing things up properly with my WD Passport 2TB drive, data transfer, and learning about VM's as you told me about earlier.

So we'll see...

This has been a great thread hmscott, and one that is bookmarked on my new JX in Goggle Chrome and refer to it often.

I've said it a dozen times, but thanks again for everything!

Until next time! LOL

All the very best! :)

P.S. The only other thing right now is all in all should I be updating ALL options listed on this page from Asus "Driver & Tools"?

http://www.asus.com/us/Notebooks_Ultrabooks/ASUS_ROG_G750JX/HelpDesk_Download/

BIOS flash? BIOS 209 (mine's 208)? Utilities, Bluetooth, etc...?

I used to use pcpitstop.com to identify updates, is there a better preferred site for our ROG laptops?

hmscott
06-19-2014, 10:45 PM
...The only other thing right now is all in all should I be updating ALL options listed on this page from Asus "Driver & Tools"?

http://www.asus.com/us/Notebooks_Ultrabooks/ASUS_ROG_G750JX/HelpDesk_Download/

BIOS flash? BIOS 209 (mine's 208)? Utilities, Bluetooth, etc...?

I used to use pcpitstop.com to identify updates, is there a better preferred site for our ROG laptops?

SupaFaztG, good you asked :)

Asus has a long held tradition of not updating the download areas for a product, when a new one has been shipped. So the JX download area is way out of date, but that is still where to get the latest BIOS

BIOS update, then go into the BIOS and select Defaults, then reboot again, you should be fine - the people with problems didn't select default, or are having coincidental errors from Windows / driver updates done at the same time - they didn't do all of them - complete the updates. If you have a JM/JS/JZ roll back to the 332.60 Asus Nvidia driver.

The place to download the latest Windows 8.x drivers for the JW/JX/JH is to poach them out of the latest shipping G750 G56 and soon the GX500 G551 machines - watch for them to get uploaded before ship dates.

Right now the JM download area has the newest, and most, I find everything there, but also go to the central areas for downloads to see if there is a newer Asus posted driver.

G750 support areas - The JM download area has the latest of all the G750, with JS/JZ next, the G750JW/JX/JH are out of date:
http://support.asus.com/Search.aspx?SLanguage=en&keyword=g750&ps=10&pn=1

Here is the latest Notebook Audio - for G750 => Realtek driver package Version V6.0.1.7235
http://support.asus.com/Download.aspx?SLanguage=en&m=Audio&os=30

Here are the latest Notebook Bluetooth drivers
http://support.asus.com/Download.aspx?SLanguage=en&m=Bluetooth&p=3&ft=27&os=30

Here are the latest Notebook WLAN drivers
http://support.asus.com/Download.aspx?SLanguage=en&m=WLAN&os=3

Here are the latest Notebook LAN drivers
http://support.asus.com/download.aspx?SLanguage=en&p=3&s=589&m=LAN&os=&hashedid=n%2fa

Notebook Asus SmartGesture
http://support.asus.com/download.aspx?SLanguage=en&p=3&m=ASUS+Smart+Gesture&hashedid=n%2fa

Here are the Asus posted VGA drivers, it's better to get the latest from Nvidia - currently 337.88, except for the JM/JS/JZ owners you probably want to keep using 332.60 to avoid random crashes - as reported by a lot of people.
http://support.asus.com/Download.aspx?SLanguage=en&m=VGA&p=3&s=111

SupaFaztG
06-22-2014, 06:26 PM
SupaFaztG, good you asked :)

Asus has a long held tradition of not updating the download areas for a product, when a new one has been shipped. So the JX download area is way out of date, but that is still where to get the latest BIOS

BIOS update, then go into the BIOS and select Defaults, then reboot again, you should be fine - the people with problems didn't select default, or are having coincidental errors from Windows / driver updates done at the same time - they didn't do all of them - complete the updates. If you have a JM/JS/JZ roll back to the 332.60 Asus Nvidia driver.

The place to download the latest Windows 8.x drivers for the JW/JX/JH is to poach them out of the latest shipping G750 G56 and soon the GX500 G551 machines - watch for them to get uploaded before ship dates.

Right now the JM download area has the newest, and most, I find everything there, but also go to the central areas for downloads to see if there is a newer Asus posted driver.

G750 support areas - The JM download area has the latest of all the G750, with JS/JZ next, the G750JW/JX/JH are out of date:
http://support.asus.com/Search.aspx?SLanguage=en&keyword=g750&ps=10&pn=1

Here is the latest Notebook Audio - for G750 => Realtek driver package Version V6.0.1.7235
http://support.asus.com/Download.aspx?SLanguage=en&m=Audio&os=30

Here are the latest Notebook Bluetooth drivers
http://support.asus.com/Download.aspx?SLanguage=en&m=Bluetooth&p=3&ft=27&os=30

Here are the latest Notebook WLAN drivers
http://support.asus.com/Download.aspx?SLanguage=en&m=WLAN&os=3

Here are the latest Notebook LAN drivers
http://support.asus.com/download.aspx?SLanguage=en&p=3&s=589&m=LAN&os=&hashedid=n%2fa

Notebook Asus SmartGesture
http://support.asus.com/download.aspx?SLanguage=en&p=3&m=ASUS+Smart+Gesture&hashedid=n%2fa

Here are the Asus posted VGA drivers, it's better to get the latest from Nvidia - currently 337.88, except for the JM/JS/JZ owners you probably want to keep using 332.60 to avoid random crashes - as reported by a lot of people.
http://support.asus.com/Download.aspx?SLanguage=en&m=VGA&p=3&s=111

AWESOME!!!

On my JX I did update Geforce Experience when the auto-update popped up to v. 337.88 and it appeared to activate things like Shadow Play which didn't appear available prior so...haven't seen any problems...

It did put the 3d Picture Viewer shortcut on my desktop, but when I clicked it nothing happened so I just deleted the shortcut. I don't have any 3D cameras, pics anyway so...

Thank you for ALL of the links!

I go back and forth between feeling like I'm accomplishing things and having some fun with my JX, and then feeling daunted again by tasks that need to be done and haven't been done yet, and my ability to do them correctly.

I'm trying not to download or put too many apps on my SSD until these things are done just in case (God help me!) I have to F9 the thing and gom back to square one again for some reason.

But, having said this, I just wanna get the necessary SSD settings, and updates and such done so I can finally just sit back and just enjoy everything.

Thanks again for all! ;)

Thanks again!

DiscoSmoke
06-25-2014, 05:58 PM
Awesome!

Thanks for the screenshot, it's very helpful.

It was awkward with 38GB on C: and 118GB all free on D: so I deleted the D: partition and extended C: so now I have 158GB on just C:. :) Much better.

Yeah so what to save and where, check. Because I am gonna put the HDD back in and "see" for data storage.

Other than that, I know you spoke of this but re: Magician is there ANYTHING worth really doing with that vs. the Windows stock disk drivers and management that was installed?

Also, the firmare updates for the SSD on the Asus downloads page for the SSD?
The motherboard and BIOS too for that matter?

http://www.samsung.com/global/business/semiconductor/samsungssd/downloads.html

Anything here worth doing before I get too comfortable with "just settling" as you so intelligently and insightfully pointed out previous?

It's just that I've read SO MUCH tech stuff I'm dizzy with what I should do, what I could do, and what I really NEED to do, you know?

At least am writing this ON my JX finally! LOL

Thanks!

SupaFaztG, I've been following this thread, and just replaced my G750JX's 750GB drive with an SSD. I'm planning on using the 750GB drive as a data drive also.

Did you use Windows' Disk Management to delete your SSD's data partition and expand its boot partition? Couldn't we do the same thing to the 750GB data drive, deleting its data partition and expanding its boot partition? Or perhaps better, shrinking its boot partition and expanding its data partition.

I don't see how this would negatively affect the G750JX's serviceability, and we would get one large data partition!

Has everything gone ok after you resized your C:(boot) partition?

As always, seeking a little assurance online before taking action.
Thank you and hmscott for the helpful thread!!