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View Full Version : Sudden Shutdown on G750JX



Dream
11-12-2013, 09:24 PM
First off, I love my G750JX. It's performed really well so far, and this sub-forum has been an awesome resource for getting the best experience out of it.

So, thanks everyone.

Moving on, I had a sudden shutdown yesterday at the completion of rendering a large video.

http://i.imgur.com/fXAJ4gL.png

That's a screenshot of the windows error log. [I believe the errors from 8/21 were due to installing the direct driver from Nvidia, and those types of shutdowns have not happened since]. The CPU runs "hot" when exporting video, if the turbo boost is left on, and I usually leave it on. Right now it is exporting a video and temps range from 89c to 96c. But the 4th gen i7 is meant to run hot as I understand it.

To clarify, I don't know if the CPU broke 100c when exporting video; which is probably when a) something is wrong, and b) the computer will shut off to protect itself. I honestly don't think it did, as it has been rendering this same video (same as yesterday) for 25 minutes straight and the temps are stable -- the fan is of course at full blast.

Does anyone else edit video on their JX? I'd like to know what temps you export at. Per my signature, Pro-Star repasted my JX before I even got it, so that rules out a bad paste job (from ASUS).

Also, my CPU is clocked via Intel XTU, with a -50mV offset (dynamic + processor cache), which is supposed to help keep temps low. I am thinking that the voltage offset possibly caused the shutdown, or maybe the inverse, that increasing the voltage offset to -75mV (or greater if stable) would help lower the temps further.

Any thoughts? I feel like I'm whining about nothing, and yet, my JX randomly shutting down makes me a little uneasy. Of course I can turn off the turbo boost by switching to the quiet office power mode (99% max CPU power state). This lowers the temps by like ... 40c. Which is incredible. But exporting video is lighting fast with TB on.

Any input is appreciated.

Edit :

The computer has never shutdown or crashed while gaming. The CPU and GPU run relatively cool while running games, even with maxed out settings. The GPU sometimes runs hotter than the CPU (I want to say it peaks in the low 70s Celsius).

Edit 2 :

No wonder the temp drops so dramatically at 99% power ... the CPU won't break .80 ghz. Well that explains the enormous speed difference.

Maxter
11-12-2013, 10:08 PM
If your CPU reached 100 C, it seems like a shut off because of over-heating. Computers will collapse upon over-heating as a way to prevent hardware damage. What I think it's interesting is that it couldn't cool enough. The G750 series is pretty good at cooling. Did you have the computer on top of your bed (probably not, but had to ask), or on a desk with no rear air flow?

Dream
11-12-2013, 10:42 PM
Nope, definitely didnt have it on a bed. Although since the air-in is from the keyboard area, this notebook does well on a bed for watching movies.

It is on a (wood) desk while exporting video. There is ~2 feet of clearance between the back of the notebook and the closest physical obstacle. The room temperature is air conditioned and cool, maybe 74 F. The air is constantly circulated by a ceiling fan as well.

On a positive note, I increased the voltage offset to -85mV ... and the temps appear to be a LOT lower. There are no observable instability issues yet.

Maxter
11-12-2013, 11:33 PM
nice going with the voltage offset! I hope it stays stable. I know there are people with their comp running hot as well, but this was the first time that seemed to overheat.

Dream
11-13-2013, 06:08 PM
So video exporting worked fine *yesterday* at -90mv and 3.6ghz, but gaming (an incredibly simple, non-graphic intensive game) produced a blue screen failure.

I imagine other games will have the same or similar result, and video exporting without problems may not be reliable at -90mv.

My current solution :

Two CPU profiles on Intel XTU

a) 3.4ghz, -80mv dynamic + p cache
b) 3.6ghz, -70mv dynamic + p cache

The stock speed and lower voltage is for work/video editing (do not need extra speed, low temps are priority).

The higher speed and closer to stock voltage are for gaming (temps are never an issue, speed is more important).

I may also update my bios to 208 and see if I can get the processor to run at full (99% power) speed, but no turbo boost. I suspect the non TB max speed would be more than adequate for video exporting, and would allow for crazy lower temps ... like 30% lower.

Prostar Computer
11-14-2013, 12:08 AM
I'd like to know how said proposed solution works out for you, Dream. :)

Maxter
11-14-2013, 02:49 AM
Do update to BIOS 208, however...

Dream
12-02-2013, 11:24 PM
Reporting in with excellent news :

I now have 3 Intel XTU profiles

A) working OC -- stock clock 3.4ghz, -80 voltage offset x 2
B) gaming OC -- 3.6 ghz, -70mv voltage offset x 2
C) video editing UC -- 3.2 ghz, -80mv voltage offset x 2

Working and gaming profiles should be obvious for their purpose. Note, I never have heating issues while gaming.

Video editing has been a different experience, but the profile I created thus far is perfect. The speed remains smoking fast, but the temps are dramatically lower, even over very long durations.

To put this in context, video editing before on the "high performance" profile when plugged in, could break 90 degrees C, even 94, 95, etc. Bad news to say the least, and resulted in 1 unexpected shut down.

On my new under clock profile ... temps don't break 75C on the CPU.

So I lose .2ghz in the turbo boost, tweak the voltage, and my temps drop nearly 20 degrees C. Moral of the story, turbo boost is unnecessary for video editing and generates a tonnnnn of heat at the top end.

I'm extremely happy with the way the notebook runs now.

hmscott
12-03-2013, 10:05 AM
Reporting in with excellent news :

I now have 3 Intel XTU profiles

A) working OC -- stock clock 3.4ghz, -80 voltage offset x 2
B) gaming OC -- 3.6 ghz, -70mv voltage offset x 2
C) video editing UC -- 3.2 ghz, -80mv voltage offset x 2

Working and gaming profiles should be obvious for their purpose. Note, I never have heating issues while gaming.

Video editing has been a different experience, but the profile I created thus far is perfect. The speed remains smoking fast, but the temps are dramatically lower, even over very long durations.

To put this in context, video editing before on the "high performance" profile when plugged in, could break 90 degrees C, even 94, 95, etc. Bad news to say the least, and resulted in 1 unexpected shut down.

On my new under clock profile ... temps don't break 75C on the CPU.

So I lose .2ghz in the turbo boost, tweak the voltage, and my temps drop nearly 20 degrees C. Moral of the story, turbo boost is unnecessary for video editing and generates a tonnnnn of heat at the top end.

I'm extremely happy with the way the notebook runs now.

Nice effort on the tuning Dream, that's the way to do it - purpose tuned custom settings for the use / application :)

It is the luck of the draw when it comes to negative voltage offset for CPU/cache voltage. My current G750JH won't let me do any... oh well, the amazing cooling in the JH keeps the max temps below 78c @ 100% CPU with max XTU multi's with 0 voltage offset... I guess that'll work :)

Every time I have had a reset (JW, JX, JH), it has been due to either me forgetting to take the GPU memory speed down after testing, or putting the offset voltage too far negative - even -25mV causes problems for this JH. So far no resets at +-0 :)

pscza
12-03-2013, 05:05 PM
Instead of having multiple profiles have you considered changing the maximum wattage allowed - and thereby the temperature dissipated (there are two parameters turbo boost and turbo boost short power max)

Dream
12-04-2013, 05:03 PM
Instead of having multiple profiles have you considered changing the maximum wattage allowed - and thereby the temperature dissipated (there are two parameters turbo boost and turbo boost short power max)

No, false.

Lowering the volts helped, but was not the root of the problem. The problem was the high clock speed combined with the task I was doing - video editing. The CPU can potentially overheat even at stock speed *with* low modded voltage. Video editing is not like gaming, it maxes out the CPU until a video is done exporting.

I edit video every day, so imagine putting your CPU through a stress test 5+ days a week, independent of all other use (gaming/personal etc).

Even with a demanding game, its not the same, not even for the GPU. The stress varies depending on what the game is doing. Video exporting is just the same max for 30, 60, 90 + minutes at a time.

pscza
12-04-2013, 06:22 PM
Actually true :p

I have just tested it - PL1 (long term power max) set to a level for transcoding - with all cores pinned system clocks down to maintain a certain wattage == heat dissipated - You can adjust the PL1 time window for how long it can go out of range this will allow for short spikes (or you can enable PL2 wattage at a higher level - for gaming)

It may not enable the fine level of control that individual profiles offer - however it does mean that you can have a "default" profile that will prevent "cooking" your CPU.