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View Full Version : G74Sx Power pin super glued?



jamcghie
12-26-2013, 11:51 PM
Hello, I recently had the pin on my power adapter come off, it came off really flat, like it didn't break but just fell off. I have the pin and the cord, no problem. My curiosity is if I can use super glue (gorilla glue) to put it back. I don't know if it is safe or a bad idea, no glue expert.

I have a new port coming and haven't soldered before, but I been trying to learn to replace the port, but am still feel sketchy about desoldering... I used google to find any information about electronics use for the glue but cant find anything.

indianacarnie
12-27-2013, 03:12 PM
Can't help you there partner. I myself wouldn't use glue anywhere NEAR my machine but that's me. Worrisome to me is the potential for "drip", "smear", and "strings". Practice up on your soldering skills on something besides the machine you want to work on first of course.

jamcghie
12-27-2013, 05:44 PM
Well if it didn't work I would have the last resort to re-solder a new one. Assuming I can even do that correctly yet. :/ I just don't know if the glue will smoke or cause a safety hazard...

indianacarnie
12-28-2013, 02:46 AM
I'm wondering about cracking/drying out/flaking debris on/in your motherboard/components in addition to my earlier misgivings about drip, splash and strings. What is the glues flashpoint? (the temp. it catches fire)

If you're a novice at this kind of handiwork the I would HIGHLY suggest you take it to a shop and have them do it. If THEY screw it up, its on them you know. Nervous people make mistakes.

jamcghie
12-28-2013, 10:59 PM
well I started the process and I can never get the wick to work. I need the wick to work to get the solder off the top without burning the board. My iron is 25W and I read multiple places that its in a good range for electronics... I am not sure why it tales so long to melt solder, maybe my thing is defective.. I have some slight blackish parts on the board and idk if that means I took too long or what. Lastly I hate my shaky hands..

jamcghie
01-06-2014, 07:26 PM
Next weekend, I will be continuing this process. If I am successful or not I will have my tax return soon that will help if I need to. I may just not replace it if it fails. I may wait till G76 comes out or something. :)

indianacarnie
01-07-2014, 02:43 PM
Well, good luck! Keep us posted.... I'm curious as to how/if it will work. I've kinda been waiting on them myself, the new model I mean. Should be soon :)

jamcghie
01-26-2014, 06:58 PM
Well, good luck! Keep us posted.... I'm curious as to how/if it will work. I've kinda been waiting on them myself, the new model I mean. Should be soon :)

So, I cant seem to do it, not sure what the problem is. I will post an image of the 6 joints in a little. I cant get the solder to melt at all using all kinds of methods found around the web, using pumps and the wick. I borrowed a 35 watt iron from a friend and it didn't do any better than my 25 watt, it just wont melt. when it does its for a fraction of a second then hardens while the iron is on it still, I really don't understand what I am doing wrong.

What can I do? I am so freaking lost!!

jamcghie
01-26-2014, 06:59 PM
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SHADO
01-26-2014, 07:42 PM
Lay the wick over the solder, then apply the iron to the wick just above the solder joint. The wick should eventually heat up enough to melt the solder, which will then just "soak" into the wick. Also make sure that your soldering iron tip is well tinned before starting. The fresh solder on the tip will help with heat transfer to the wick. Also, don't forget that the lead-free solders used these days have a higher melting temperature than the old lead solders. You may need a hotter iron. Best of luck!

jamcghie
01-27-2014, 07:45 PM
Lay the wick over the solder, then apply the iron to the wick just above the solder joint. The wick should eventually heat up enough to melt the solder, which will then just "soak" into the wick. Also make sure that your soldering iron tip is well tinned before starting. The fresh solder on the tip will help with heat transfer to the wick. Also, don't forget that the lead-free solders used these days have a higher melting temperature than the old lead solders. You may need a hotter iron. Best of luck!

The solder must be lead free, but so is my 99.3% tin/.07% copper 0.031" Diam Rosin Core solder and it melts fast. I read in many places to not keep the iron on the board for more than 4 seconds as a general rule, I don't want to ruin the board.

Should I perhaps hold the iron to the wick until it does indeed liquify and suck up the solder?
Also, I try to tin the tip but the solder balls up and slides off (on the borrowed 35W), so I don't know what to do there. I was however able to tin my 25 watt one.

Lastly, thanks for the reply/advice.

SHADO
01-27-2014, 10:46 PM
Well, in GENERAL, the melting point of lead-free solder is 5℃ to as much as 45℃ higher than conventional eutectic solder. But there are lead-free solders with lower melting points available, as well. True, you don't want to heat the board any longer than needed to get the job done, to minimize the chance of damage. But by applying the iron to the wick, and the wick then transferring the heat to the solder to be removed will take more time to heat up. I have removed maybe 6 or 7 broken laptop power jacks using the method I mentioned, and have been fortunate enough to have never damaged a board yet. Maybe I'm just lucky. I dunno.

jamcghie
04-27-2014, 03:39 PM
Well, in GENERAL, the melting point of lead-free solder is 5℃ to as much as 45℃ higher than conventional eutectic solder. But there are lead-free solders with lower melting points available, as well. True, you don't want to heat the board any longer than needed to get the job done, to minimize the chance of damage. But by applying the iron to the wick, and the wick then transferring the heat to the solder to be removed will take more time to heat up. I have removed maybe 6 or 7 broken laptop power jacks using the method I mentioned, and have been fortunate enough to have never damaged a board yet. Maybe I'm just lucky. I dunno.

By the way, I had a friend help me. He has a professional iron, with temp dial and gold sponge etc. Even he had problems, at 600 degrees F! What we did was solder at the same time. He noticed that 4 of the 6 pins on the port are just a metal housing used to hold it in the board better, so he cut those off with wire cutters. We didn't get all the solder off, it wasn't reacting too well to suckers. He got some copper wire and made his own wick, we didn't have any. We got the pins out and such. to put the new one in, we both heated separate joints and had light pressure on the new port to go in. This process took us probably an hour or so, the solder wouldn't stay liquid long, of course. But we got it all the way on, I had to order a new battery ($30 on ebay) and it works like new!

Also, one thing that helped, he had a flux pen. Perhaps the solder needed that to react. We weren't making much progress before the flux pen. Overall it probably took us 3 hours... So worth it though.