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Darnassus
01-09-2014, 05:32 AM
Gah I hate partitioned disks, especially when it's a drive as small as a 256GB SSD.

Anyone know how I can get rid of the partition without losing any data? The most safest way?

Also, if I do a reinstall with the 16 GB usb, will the partitions come back? ( I hope not. )

hmscott
01-09-2014, 10:18 AM
Gah I hate partitioned disks, especially when it's a drive as small as a 256GB SSD.

Anyone know how I can get rid of the partition without losing any data? The most safest way?

Also, if I do a reinstall with the 16 GB usb, will the partitions come back? ( I hope not. )

You want to backup the data on the partition you are giving up, then go in to Right Click My Computer => Manage => Storage => right click on partition to delete, delete, right click on partition to absorb free space, extend, take defaults, wait, voila!

In this snippet, my 1TB 2 partitions have already been merged, and I am going to merge the 2 2x128GB RAID partitions:

32129

Doing it...

32131

done :)

32132

Darnassus
01-09-2014, 12:03 PM
So as far as I understand if I do this, I will lose everything on the 2nd partition of the SSD, but not the first? My operating system will be fine?

Just move everything out of the SSD onto the mechanical drive, do as you say, then move it back, and everything will be fine?

Also, what drive is the recovery on? As far as I see on your screenshots, it's on the SSD. How annoying lol.

I guess I should wait until I can back it up before I get rid of any of the partitions.

ryandb2
01-10-2014, 04:29 AM
Yep recovery is on the SSD. You will loose anything in the second half of the merged disk (Data F:), basically 95gb is allocated on the OS partition and 122GB on the data partition, you need to delete the larger partition (Data F:), then expand OS C: to take up the extra space. It isn't really worth fiddling with two recovery partitions in my opinion, but it is really dumb that Asus did this.

The regular hard disk you can just delete both and merge assuming you don't have any data stored there yet.

Darnassus
01-10-2014, 05:05 AM
Yep recovery is on the SSD. You will loose anything in the second half of the merged disk (Data F:), basically 95gb is allocated on the OS partition and 122GB on the data partition, you need to delete the larger partition (Data F:), then expand OS C: to take up the extra space. It isn't really worth fiddling with two recovery partitions in my opinion, but it is really dumb that Asus did this.

The regular hard disk you can just delete both and merge assuming you don't have any data stored there yet.

Exactly why I'm doing this. And when I want to download a big game to my SSD but I have no room then that's just going to annoy me.

Darnassus
01-10-2014, 05:13 AM
Done, worked perfectly. Now I won't have a massive section of SSD space that won't be getting any attention as much as the other.

Thanks hmscott and ryandb2

Norup58
01-10-2014, 08:07 AM
Do not understand why people are set against the SSD being split into 2 partitions?
As I see it if the OS crashes for some reason and you need to reinstall it then only the data on Drive C will be lost but whatever is on Drive F is still there/safe.

Which brings back the question asked by #Darnassus in the OP:
If Asus Backtrack is used to restore will the SSD be partitioned into 2 drives (C & F) and thus also delete what is on the present Drive F? (This would be cr.. and negate my above point)

hmscott
01-10-2014, 08:13 AM
Do not understand why people are set against the SSD being split into 2 partitions?
As I see it if the OS crashes for some reason and you need to reinstall it then only the data on Drive C will be lost but whatever is on Drive F is still there/safe.
Which brings back the question asked by #Darnassus in the OP:
If Asus Backtrack is used to restore will the SSD be partitioned into 2 drives (C & F) and thus also delete what is on the present Drive F? (This would be cr.. and negate my above point)

Norup58, thanks for reminding me, yes, Backtracker blows away everything on the volume you are restoring to - it blew away all my combined partitions before building a clean Asus restore - including the twin partitions for each volume. And, it blew away the 1TB drive partition and made 2 new partitions on it too!

Fortunately I knew that before I did the restore, I backed everything up I wanted to save as files and an image backup to an external driver first.

The reason you want to combine the partitions is that everything puts something into the C drive, even if you install to another drive most programs still need to put stuff on the C drive, eventually limiting what you can install even with large secondary drives. A "Feature" of Windows :)

Norup58
01-10-2014, 08:46 AM
Norup58, thanks for reminding me, yes, Backtracker blows away everything on the volume you are restoring to - it blew away all my combined partitions before building a clean Asus restore - including the twin partitions for each volume. And, it blew away the 1TB drive partition and made 2 new partitions on it too!

Fortunately I knew that before I did the restore, I backed everything up I wanted to save as files and an image backup to an external driver first.

The reason you want to combine the partitions is that everything puts something into the C drive, even if you install to another drive most programs still need to put stuff on the C drive, eventually limiting what you can install even with large secondary drives. A "Feature" of Windows :)

Yes I know programs (incl games) install DLL files and such to the C drive and the programs/games wont run if you do a re-install of the OS.
Maybe its old school but I prefer to keep the C drive as ‘clean’ as possible and only have 'real' programs on it, meaning I have games on the F drive and as I play Skyrim heavily modded all I have to do is reinstall/ overwrite Skyrim and I have my game back as I want it. Anyway, each to his own ;)

But Backtracker, if it behaves as you say (not doubting you) then this really sucks. If the OS crashes how you are supposed to access drives D, E & F before doing the restore?
Gonna fire up Acronis and do a backup of the lappy immediately.

ryandb2
01-10-2014, 09:40 PM
I concur with hmscott, I used backtracker and it does indeed blow away the F drive and recreate the two partitions which is ridiculous. As far as the partitions, my big problem is I always end up running out of space, not matter how large the OS partition. This is mostly because I program and everything installs large files on the OS partition without options to move the data. And rather than fighting with symbolic links I would rather just have a gigantic disk I never have to worry about :)

Zygomorphic
01-11-2014, 12:44 AM
Do not understand why people are set against the SSD being split into 2 partitions?
As I see it if the OS crashes for some reason and you need to reinstall it then only the data on Drive C will be lost but whatever is on Drive F is still there/safe.

Which brings back the question asked by #Darnassus in the OP:
If Asus Backtrack is used to restore will the SSD be partitioned into 2 drives (C & F) and thus also delete what is on the present Drive F? (This would be cr.. and negate my above point)
The key reason is that the OS may crash, but the disk could also fail, at which point the data on both partitions would be lost. Multiple partitions on the same disk are good when you are reinstalling the OS on a regular basis, as I am with my multiple LINUX installations. If you aren't doing things like that, then having multiple partitions on the SSD is just asking for more trouble than benefit.

Darnassus
01-12-2014, 03:41 AM
The key reason is that the OS may crash, but the disk could also fail, at which point the data on both partitions would be lost. Multiple partitions on the same disk are good when you are reinstalling the OS on a regular basis, as I am with my multiple LINUX installations. If you aren't doing things like that, then having multiple partitions on the SSD is just asking for more trouble than benefit.

I just don't want to have "disk is full, consider deleting some items" problem so often. I put games onto my SSD, I only have 30gigs space left now. 256 gigs is already small.

I moved my downloads folder to my mechanical drive, and a lot of other things, now I have 130 gigs left of space, but I foresee it won't last long. Half full and I've only had this laptop for a week.

I've got a loooot of games to try.

(Came from a 9200m GS + Penryn 2.0gz dualcore... to a GTX 770m + i7 4700MQ )

Zygomorphic
01-12-2014, 12:54 PM
I just don't want to have "disk is full, consider deleting some items" problem so often. I put games onto my SSD, I only have 30gigs space left now. 256 gigs is already small.

I moved my downloads folder to my mechanical drive, and a lot of other things, now I have 130 gigs left of space, but I foresee it won't last long. Half full and I've only had this laptop for a week.

I've got a loooot of games to try.

(Came from a 9200m GS + Penryn 2.0gz dualcore... to a GTX 770m + i7 4700MQ )
Sweet upgrade, I must say. :)

Unfortunately, if you have that much stuff, there isn't much that you can about it, since games take up a ton of space, and 256 GB SSD is pretty small for that function. Since I don't play games, I don't tend to use that much space, LOL. :p

For you, I wouldn't do the multiple partitions route. I do it because of my workload, which is preserving user data - not programs across installations.