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Waerloga
03-05-2014, 10:17 PM
Hi,

I just recently purchased a g750jh (upgraded from g74sx) with 2 SSD and one HDD. I've never had multiple hard drives partitioned separately on my computer and I'm unsure how they work. I cannot tell which drives are my SSD and which ones are my HDD.

What I believe happened is that they used one of my SSD's and downloaded the OS, then broke my HDD into two separate drives?

I"m just unsure where to save my information (ie. game downloads) because I have a sneaking suspicion that they shouldn't go on my C: drive. However, here are the choices: OS ( C: ) , Data1 ( D: ), Data 2: ( E: ), DATA ( F: ).

I know with SSDs the big thing is to install your OS on to it so that boot time is minimal (thus the OS drive). However, most of the space I have is in the Data1 and Data2 drives. I'm just not sure how to work this because I'm use to only having a C: drive. Will saving game data onto a different drive affect anything? Especially since it's not in Program Files?

I guess I simply just don't understand how it works and need a complete run down from an expert.

themeonster
03-05-2014, 10:50 PM
Unless you like the way the drives are partitioned I recommend that you use the partition manager built into windows to consolidate all of those partitions into two drives. (The SSD raid array and the HDD) I personally don't like them that way but fortunately it is an easy fix.
In general you want to keep program data and possibly some games on the SSD to take advantage of improved loading times. And keep any other large files that don't need to be loaded at the fastest speed possible (music, movies, pictures, etc.) on the HDD. Also something to keep in mind about SSDs is that they wear with the number of writes put on them so anything that you can do to minimize writes to it will help improve the life of the OS drive. If you have any other questions don't hesitate to ask, this is a support forum and there are many people here eager to help.

Waerloga
03-06-2014, 12:20 AM
Thanks for the hasty reply! I don't know how to partition hard drives. Furthermore, I'm not sure how to tell which drives are SSD and which are HDD.

So I'm going to be playing ESO, should i save the information to my OS drive (SSD) or HDD?

Waerloga
03-06-2014, 02:49 AM
Furthermore, won't partitioning my SSDs delete all info (including my OS) from my comp?

themeonster
03-06-2014, 04:06 AM
If you delete the right partitions it will not remove your OS. I will attach a picture of my partition manager as it is now. If you search for Disk Management in control panel it will be under "Create and format hard disk partitions" I am assuming that you, like me, have a 1TB HDD and 2 128 GB SSDs in RAID 0. In the partition manager the SSDs appear as one drive and asus for whatever reason has split both the HDD and SSD into 2 drives each for a total of 4 drives. So what I did when I got my G750JH here is what I did.

1. Make a backup. I used asus backtracker which doesn't do a true backup but copies the recovery partition so you don't have to worry so much about losing it. You can find it in the downloads section of the asus support site.

2. If you have put anything on the computer move as much as you can to the drive labeled OS or an external storage device. This simplifies things and avoids the accidental deletion of data.

3. Open the partition manager and get a feeling for how it works. Don't delete anything yet. There should be 8 partitions but we are concerned with the ones labeled OS, DATA, Data 1, and Data 2. Just leave the other ones.

4. Now double check that you don't have any valuable data or programs on the partitions labeled data and delete the one of the Data partitions on the HDD. If I remember correctly it should be as simple as right click and select delete volume. It might be that the deleted volume has to be empty.

5. Extend the remaining volume on the HDD to fill the empty space. Again it should be as simple as right click, extend volume and in the window that pops up set it to take all of the free space.

6. Now for the OS drive. Delete the volume labeled data and extend the OS partition to take the empty space. You would be best off not deleting the nameless drives as they consist of recovery partitions and other such recovery stuff.

7. Reboot. Not sure if this step is necessary but it doesn't hurt.

8. Now you should have a much simpler file storage system.

As for where you should put ESO, that is up to you. If you want the loading speeds that a pair of SSDs in raid provide you could put it on the C drive. But if 20+ GB of space is too much to use up on the relatively small C drive, the HDD provides adequate performance.

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P.S. For best results, any benchmarking software should be installed on the OS drive.

aarbogh
03-06-2014, 09:17 PM
Was just wondering the about the same. I’ve already combined the 1TB HD, but for the SSD there is a hidden 350MB (Recovery Partition) between the two I like to join. Anyone know what this is good for? I really don’t want to mess up the recovery partition.

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hm

themeonster
03-07-2014, 02:20 AM
Where the partition is within a drive in the partition manager shouldn't matter. You should be able to delete the DATA partition and extend the OS one without messing with any of the recovery partitions.

aarbogh
03-07-2014, 09:27 AM
No, I’m not able to Extend the OS partition after deleting the DATA partition. I believe that the location of the partitions on the disk matters so I also need to delete the 350 MB partition or use a more powerful partition manager to move things around. But last time I did that (on a different ASUS laptop) the recovery setup did not work anymore.

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hm

hmscott
03-07-2014, 10:30 AM
No, I’m not able to Extend the OS partition after deleting the DATA partition. I believe that the location of the partitions on the disk matters so I also need to delete the 350 MB partition or use a more powerful partition manager to move things around. But last time I did that (on a different ASUS laptop) the recovery setup did not work anymore.
hm

That's why you get a 16GB or larger USB 3.0 flash drive, and use Asus Backtracker to build a bootable recovery on the flash drive before you blow away the recovery partitions. Then you can delete the partitions and merge the space - and still have the recovery flash drive for future recovery.

Just don't forget to pull the 1TB (2nd bay drive) when doing the recovery restore later, as it will blow away both drives partitions and build the OEM Asus install on them, just like out of the box.

aarbogh
03-10-2014, 09:21 PM
That brings me to one of my other problems Backtracker won’t work.

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aarbogh
03-11-2014, 12:42 PM
It is actually only the ASUS Driver option that crashes Backtracker. I’m able to back up the recovery image! Strange, but I’m able to do what I want….

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hm

Clintlgm
03-11-2014, 09:04 PM
Macrium Reflect (http://support.asus.com/Download.aspx?SLanguage=en&m=G75VW&p=3&s=388) just works, its free they've had the UEFI GPT thing figured out since 2012

noone
03-12-2014, 12:57 AM
Your link does not go where you likely wanted, I assume you wanted: http://www.macrium.com/reflectfree.aspx

Lux55
04-11-2014, 06:43 PM
That's why you get a 16GB or larger USB 3.0 flash drive, and use Asus Backtracker to build a bootable recovery on the flash drive before you blow away the recovery partitions. Then you can delete the partitions and merge the space - and still have the recovery flash drive for future recovery.

Just don't forget to pull the 1TB (2nd bay drive) when doing the recovery restore later, as it will blow away both drives partitions and build the OEM Asus install on them, just like out of the box.

Going through this now with my new JS. Doing the above would result in no recovery partition on the system, correct? If the OS were corrupted the only recovery would be through the flash drive?

So it appears that NTFS requires that the extents for a volume be contiguous. Has Asus ever offered any explanation why they setup the partitions this way? They may have recognized this particular issue as my JS has the recovery partition at the end. The data partition immediately follows the OS partition. Wish I'd read this thread sooner, then I'd already have a fresh flash drive in hand instead of thinking I could write my recovery disk to DVD.

hmscott
04-11-2014, 08:47 PM
Going through this now with my new JS. Doing the above would result in no recovery partition on the system, correct? If the OS were corrupted the only recovery would be through the flash drive?

You would use the USB Asus Backtracker USB drive for recovery, or the original HD recovery partitions to build a new USB recovery flash drive.

When you build the SSD to use, and have the backup drive / recovery usb set aside, you can remove the recovery partitions on the running boot drive because you don't need recovery partitions on every drive you build from the recovery USB. You can free up that space for use - and on a 256GB RAID0 that is a large percentage gain.