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View Full Version : What is the best 7200 RPM HDD for laptops?



pokerface
03-31-2014, 04:56 PM
I am going to buy a 1 TB SSD for my laptop, I am thinking of replacing my Seagate 1 TB HDD 5400 RPM but don't know which is the best 7200 RP one to go for and if would be worth it?

chassy809
03-31-2014, 06:56 PM
I am going to buy a 1 TB SSD for my laptop, I am thinking of replacing my Seagate 1 TB HDD 5400 RPM but don't know which is the best 7200 RP one to go for and if would be worth it?
you better buy an SSD... not much difference between the 5400 RPM and 7200 RPM in terms of performance. good luck !!

pokerface
03-31-2014, 08:48 PM
well I am buying a 1 TB Samsung Evo as my main drive but cannot afford and SSD for the second one

so I can get a good 7200 RPM 2 TB HDD for like 80 USD

hmscott
03-31-2014, 10:22 PM
well I am buying a 1 TB Samsung Evo as my main drive but cannot afford and SSD for the second one
so I can get a good 7200 RPM 2 TB HDD for like 80 USD

pokerface, it depends on how you want to use your HD, but these days I pull out the spinning drive and put it in a USB 3.0 enclosure and keep the heat / noise / weight out of the laptop.

A 1TB SSD main drive should be large enough to hold lots of stuff, games, etc, and then you can use the HD for backup, leaving it safe at home.

But if you want to get a large drive into the 2nd Bay, check the reviews before selecting, and let us know how you like it :)

You can use QuietHDD AAM/APM to improve performance and cut out the clicking noises from the head parking.
https://sites.google.com/site/quiethdd/

c3141rog
04-01-2014, 01:00 AM
A 7200RPM laptop hard-drive will offer you almost no performance benefit but will increase heat, noise/vibration, and power usage. Best to buy a hybrid drive like the Seagate SSHD instead.

All modern laptop hard drives are crippled with acoustical management that retards the speed of the read/write arm to reduce noise. It used to be possible to turn this off but a patent troll managed to patent the ability to turn it off (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Automatic_acoustic_management)and sued both WD and Seagate and now, as a result, all hard drives have this acoustical management hard-wired on. As such, even with a 7200RPM hard drive, you can expect seek times in the 15-20ms range (as opposed to the 5-8ms you'd get on a 7200RPM desktop drive).

hmscott
04-01-2014, 01:13 AM
A 7200RPM laptop hard-drive will offer you almost no performance benefit but will increase heat, noise/vibration, and power usage. Best to buy a hybrid drive like the Seagate SSHD instead.

All modern laptop hard drives are crippled with acoustical management that retards the speed of the read/write arm to reduce noise. It used to be possible to turn this off but a patent troll managed to patent the ability to turn it off (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Automatic_acoustic_management)and sued both WD and Seagate and now, as a result, all hard drives have this acoustical management hard-wired on. As such, even with a 7200RPM hard drive, you can expect seek times in the 15-20ms range (as opposed to the 5-8ms you'd get on a 7200RPM desktop drive).

It looks like AAM was removed, not locked on.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Automatic_acoustic_management

"AAM is no longer available for Seagate and Western Digital drives. In 2008, Seagate removed AAM capabilities from all its drives because Convolve alleged that one of its patents, US Patent No. 6,314,473 covers AAM technology. Western Digital began doing the same in 2011, without making any official announcements, nor updating their product documentation. The product specification sheets continue to claim (in March 2012) that there are different seek modes on their drives. However the hardware that is now manufactured does not allow control over AAM (for instance, the premium 1 TB Caviar Black (WD1002FAEX, SATA600, 3.5", 7200 RPM, 64 MB cache does not allow AAM to be enabled)."

Confusing. "...does not allow AAM to be enabled"?? So it is there, but not enabled?

APM
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Advanced_power_management

APM is responsible for the clicking noises people complain about, QuietHDD can turn APM off, or change the level of power saving.

c3141rog
04-03-2014, 12:04 PM
It looks like AAM was removed, not locked on.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Automatic_acoustic_management

"AAM is no longer available for Seagate and Western Digital drives. In 2008, Seagate removed AAM capabilities from all its drives because Convolve alleged that one of its patents, US Patent No. 6,314,473 covers AAM technology. Western Digital began doing the same in 2011, without making any official announcements, nor updating their product documentation. The product specification sheets continue to claim (in March 2012) that there are different seek modes on their drives. However the hardware that is now manufactured does not allow control over AAM (for instance, the premium 1 TB Caviar Black (WD1002FAEX, SATA600, 3.5", 7200 RPM, 64 MB cache does not allow AAM to be enabled)."

Confusing. "...does not allow AAM to be enabled"?? So it is there, but not enabled?

APM
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Advanced_power_management

APM is responsible for the clicking noises people complain about, QuietHDD can turn APM off, or change the level of power saving.

Automatic acoustical management was removed. Acoustical management was not. The automatic part means that it can be controlled by the software. Now, they just hard wire in a fixed speed reduction rather than dynamically adjusting it in software.

hmscott
04-03-2014, 12:06 PM
Automatic acoustical management was removed. Acoustical management was not. The automatic part means that it can be controlled by the software. Now, they just hard-code in the speed reduction without the option to turn it off.

I haven't seen that affect performance test results. Do you have any examples with benchmark results that you can share a link with us?