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View Full Version : What is with all this talk of backtracker??



CoryBee
11-25-2014, 08:09 AM
Why is it so important to make a backup and then restore it onto your new hard drive?

Why can't I just wipe everything and start from scratch. Then install Windows 8.1 and all the drivers from the ROG site?

I did this with my G750JZ and have never had an issue, I think I got 1 or 2 BSOD while running 3 - 4 Virtual machines at once. But I routinely do this so...

Someone want to hit me with a bucket of enlightenment?

Richdog
11-25-2014, 11:59 AM
Making a backup of a stock machine just secure you against any worst-case scenarios, so you can restore the system to working settings. It's not rocket science.

QC_AGENT
11-25-2014, 03:01 PM
You want the ability to restore it w/ the factory setting for the following reasons:

A) You might want to sell it in a year or two and offer the opportunity to the buyer to get the Laptop in full factory condition, like new.

B) You might get an hardware problem. You will need to recover the LapTop at factory settings to make sure your problem is not bound to your clever set up and to facilitate the Asus Warranty services

Personally, I always keep the ability to restore my valuable stuff in new condition. I Keep the OEM box, small plastic bags, tiewrap, foam and owner's guide. I just sold my G75 to finance my G751. The buyer was very pleased to get it in pristine like new out of the factory condition.

CoryBee
11-25-2014, 06:43 PM
You want the ability to restore it w/ the factory setting for the following reasons:

A) You might want to sell it in a year or two and offer the opportunity to the buyer to get the Laptop in full factory condition, like new.

B) You might get an hardware problem. You will need to recover the LapTop at factory settings to make sure your problem is not bound to your clever set up and to facilitate the Asus Warranty services

Personally, I always keep the ability to restore my valuable stuff in new condition. I Keep the OEM box, small plastic bags, tiewrap, foam and owner's guide. I just sold my G75 to finance my G751. The buyer was very pleased to get it in pristine like new out of the factory condition.

I figured that was the case, thank you.

I just wasn't sure if there was something special about these I overlooked.

hmscott
11-25-2014, 07:47 PM
I figured that was the case, thank you.

I just wasn't sure if there was something special about these I overlooked.

CoryBee, there are also odd things that occur with clean installs that don't happen with the stock Asus build, likely due to drivers streamed during their builds that take priority over default Windows drivers causing different issues than the Asus build, and Asus can't help you debug those because they aren't running your special from scratch Windows install.

Some with from scratch Windows installs have USB 3.0 speed issues that those with the Asus build don't, there is no clear fix for this.

Those with the G750JM started getting fewer crashes with 344.11 driver, and most have no crashes on 344.65/70/75, but those with a from scratch Windows install still have occasional BSOD's.

The Asus utilities I uninstall can be uninstalled in a few minutes, and I can restore from the Asus Backtracker or a Macrium Reflect cloned image and get to the same Asus build as Asus has for support in a shorter time than I can do a from scratch Windows install.

I uninstall: Asus Splendid, Asus Power4Gear, Asus Live (update), Asus Gaming Mouse, Cyberlink Power2Go, AsusDVD, Asus Vibe 2.0.

Having the same install as Asus when reporting problems, reporting test results, and sharing tests steps and observations is possible with the original Asus OS install. As soon as you tell Asus you have your own install they discount everything.

The same for sharing on the forum, if you have a different install than the others on the forum, then your results may be in question and not comparable to everyone that has the Asus install.

There is no performance advantage to doing a from scratch Windows install.

The Asus Backtracker backup lets you set your original HDD aside, and make any HDD/SSD an original Asus Windows boot drive. It is the only media backup for recovery available, you can't purchase a recovery DVD/USB from Asus.

Be sure and test your recovery flash drive after creating it successfully,, to make sure restore works - some USB 3.0 drive controllers fail the restore even after successfully completing the create. Remove any original HDD/disks from the laptop when doing a restore - the restore will blow away the partitions on any disks it sees when starting the restore.

Creating the Asus Backtracker flash recovery drive is the first thing everyone should do with their laptop before risking losing the ability to create it :)

CoryBee
11-25-2014, 08:14 PM
Many thanks scott!

Now, I need to run my hard drive in MBR mode not GPT. Can the backtracker software clone onto an MBR formatted drive?

hmscott
11-25-2014, 08:33 PM
Many thanks scott!

Now, I need to run my hard drive in MBR mode not GPT. Can the backtracker software clone onto an MBR formatted drive?

CoryBee, I haven't tried, my drives were already GPT, but Asus Backtracker should do this for you. If you have trouble booting on the restored drive, GPT vs MBR is the first thing to check. You can put the drive into an external case and hook it up to another PC and re-format as GPT.

When I used Macrium Reflect to clone my first boot drives, before I learned of Asus Backtracker, Macrium Reflect cloned the GPT over an MBR drive making it GPT - which some partition cloners don't.

CoryBee
11-25-2014, 08:44 PM
CoryBee, I haven't tried, my drives were already GPT, but Asus Backtracker should do this for you. If you have trouble booting on the restored drive, GPT vs MBR is the first thing to check. You can put the drive into an external case and hook it up to another PC and re-format as GPT.

When I used Macrium Reflect to clone my first boot drives, before I learned of Asus Backtracker, Macrium Reflect cloned the GPT over an MBR drive making it GPT - which some partition cloners don't.

It is not the matter of formatting a drive to GBP. I need to have an MBR partition as my main partition so I can use whole drive encryption on my machines.

I guess I will find out when I get it.

It was very tricky to get the MBR partition working with the newer bios systems on these laptops. But I managed.

hmscott
11-26-2014, 01:54 AM
It is not the matter of formatting a drive to GBP. I need to have an MBR partition as my main partition so I can use whole drive encryption on my machines.
I guess I will find out when I get it.
It was very tricky to get the MBR partition working with the newer bios systems on these laptops. But I managed.

CoryBee, sorry, misread that, most people ask how to get GPT, not the other way around. :)

CoryBee
11-26-2014, 05:13 AM
Yea, I am an odd one in the bunch.

I like my security, 32 character passwords FTW!

Myk SilentShadow
11-26-2014, 11:45 AM
Hey hmscott, in reference to your statement about regular Windows installs not being able to cope with USB3 speeds and there being no fix, well, there is a fix. All you do is download the latest drivers needed for your laptop, grab the windows ISO from Microsoft you need and also use this: http://www.ntlite.com/

Awesome little tool to integrate(slipstream) drivers, updates, remove Windows junk etc :cool:

hmscott
11-26-2014, 12:07 PM
Hey hmscott, in reference to your statement about regular Windows installs not being able to cope with USB3 speeds and there being no fix, well, there is a fix. All you do is download the latest drivers needed for your laptop, grab the windows ISO from Microsoft you need and also use this: http://www.ntlite.com/

Awesome little tool to integrate(slipstream) drivers, updates, remove Windows junk etc :cool:


CoryBee, there are also odd things that occur with clean installs that don't happen with the stock Asus build, likely due to drivers streamed during their builds that take priority over default Windows drivers causing different issues than the Asus build, and Asus can't help you debug those because they aren't running your special from scratch Windows install...

Myk SilentShadow, very few people are even aware of slipstreaming drivers, ordering them for proper install to override Microsoft defaults, and wouldn't know how do it. And, when you try to teach them about it, they get upset because it is sooo hard, and then end up with, "Why can't I just click Install?"

If you know how to do a build properly, there is no way you are going to suggest to the average user to do a from scratch Windows install onto their new laptop themselves.

The real Build process to get the results desired is far more complicated than the average Windows user suspects.

Why think for 1 second that you can do better than Asus?

Even using all the same build tools and methods Asus used, you then need to figure out how to order the build to get the same result as Asus, and that is likely already the best it can be.

So why not use the result of Asus hard work and use their OS build?

It's ludicrous to blow away your only copy of Asus finely tuned OS Build, custom made for your specific Laptop model, and then "Just Click Install" and think you have outsmarted Asus and done it better yourself.

It'll boot, maybe, it'll even mostly work, but there will be enough that won't work, it takes discovering 1 broken thing, and you then have to suffer through knowing your laptop isn't running as well as it did out of the box.

Then you have to live with it for the rest of the time you own the laptop, because you didn't back up the original Asus OS Install.

Common Sense tells you to keep a copy for backup; common sense should also tell you to be happy and enjoy the OS built for you by the experts that built your laptop. :)

Myk SilentShadow
11-26-2014, 12:31 PM
I totally agree with you on keeping a copy on hand if in the event something goes wrong, you can just use backtracker and get the laptop back into it's original out-of-the-box condition, but honestly, slipstreaming is a snap, first time I heard about it, I Googled it, read half the guide and figured out the rest myself. Oh and no, the build process is not complicated at all.

hmscott
11-26-2014, 12:38 PM
I totally agree with you on keeping a copy on hand if in the event something goes wrong, you can just use backtracker and get the laptop back into it's original out-of-the-box condition, but honestly, slipstreaming is a snap, first time I heard about it, I Googled it, read half the guide and figured out the rest myself. Oh and no, the build process is not complicated at all.

Myk SilentShadow, it isn't tough for you or me, and not for others, but the average gamer getting the laptop for gaming, that is looking to others for how to get the best performance, aren't going to know these things, or have an interest in learning them, but they will listen to people like you saying how easy it is and try it themselves, and get into trouble.

I have helped many people that have done that, gotten in to trouble, they blew away their original HDD boot install, so had no recourse except to return their laptop - or live with the problems. Most return the laptop and get something else. We don't hear from them again..

You haven't given a reason to do it at all, why do a from scratch Windows install, of the same Windows release, on a perfectly good working laptop?

There is no performance advantage, there is no space savings, there are no additional functions as a benefit, there are no support advantages - in fact Asus will claim your own Windows install negates debugging support from them until you send in the laptop so they can test it on their OS build.

There are only disadvantages to doing a from scratch Windows install on an ROG laptop.

What is the advantage, why do you insist on recommending new inexperienced users do their own OS install on their new perfectly good working laptops?

Mublur
11-26-2014, 06:35 PM
I don't see any reason to use the backtracker. You can download win8.1 images from microsoft, use the generic installation key to create installation disks, and after installing you can use the OEM-key in your laptop to activate it. I recommend using something like ProduKey to find out your key (it is not written on the body anymore like they used to)

QC_AGENT
11-26-2014, 07:42 PM
I don't see any reason to use the backtracker. You can download win8.1 images from microsoft, use the generic installation key to create installation disks, and after installing you can use the OEM-key in your laptop to activate it. I recommend using something like ProduKey to find out your key (it is not written on the body anymore like they used to)

Because the Win 8.1 is a generic OS built for massive compatibility. The Asus factory built is fine tuned for your specific Laptop. Please read hmscott explanation just one line up

ammar.2520
11-27-2014, 03:46 PM
You want the ability to restore it w/ the factory setting for the following reasons:

A) You might want to sell it in a year or two and offer the opportunity to the buyer to get the Laptop in full factory condition, like new.

B) You might get an hardware problem. You will need to recover the LapTop at factory settings to make sure your problem is not bound to your clever set up and to facilitate the Asus Warranty services

Personally, I always keep the ability to restore my valuable stuff in new condition. I Keep the OEM box, small plastic bags, tiewrap, foam and owner's guide. I just sold my G75 to finance my G751. The buyer was very pleased to get it in pristine like new out of the factory condition.

Hi
is it works with the new ASUS G751 JT that version without SSD?
to move system and recovery partition from HDD to New Ssd?any experience with Windows 8.1

hmscott
11-28-2014, 08:52 AM
Hi
is it works with the new ASUS G751 JT that version without SSD?
to move system and recovery partition from HDD to New Ssd?any experience with Windows 8.1

ammar, several people have reported that Asus Backtracker works great to backup the recovery partition on the original HDD (you have to do this while booted on the original HDD), and then they use the recovery flash drive they created to restore to their new SSD, and it boots fine. A couple of things to note.

The Asus Backtracker creation of the USB 3.0 16GB flash drive may erase other USB devices, a couple of reports of this, but they likely accidentally selected their other USB storage for the restore, don't do that, be safe and remove all other USB storage from the laptop before starting to create the USB 3.0 16GB flash recovery drive.

When doing the restore to the new SSD, physically remove the original boot HDD and any other HDD/SSD that is in the 2nd bay, as the first thing that Asus Backtracker recovery flash drive will do is to erase all the internal disks it see's, create new partitions, and then start the restore - it will erase your original HDD if it is installed. Best to put the new SSD where the old HDD was installed, and put the original HDD aside to keep safe.

Have fun :)

ammar.2520
12-03-2014, 05:14 AM
ammar, several people have reported that Asus Backtracker works great to backup the recovery partition on the original HDD (you have to do this while booted on the original HDD), and then they use the recovery flash drive they created to restore to their new SSD, and it boots fine. A couple of things to note.

The Asus Backtracker creation of the USB 3.0 16GB flash drive may erase other USB devices, a couple of reports of this, but they likely accidentally selected their other USB storage for the restore, don't do that, be safe and remove all other USB storage from the laptop before starting to create the USB 3.0 16GB flash recovery drive.

When doing the restore to the new SSD, physically remove the original boot HDD and any other HDD/SSD that is in the 2nd bay, as the first thing that Asus Backtracker recovery flash drive will do is to erase all the internal disks it see's, create new partitions, and then start the restore - it will erase your original HDD if it is installed. Best to put the new SSD where the old HDD was installed, and put the original HDD aside to keep safe.

Have fun :)

i did like advised me previously,
1. I downloaded Asus Backtracker after reading these forums.
2. I installed Asus Backtracker on a Sansdisk Cruzer 32gb thumb drive that I just bought that is usb 3.0 and 2.0 compatible.
3. I returned my factory HDD to factory default using the Backtracker off my thumb drive without issue to make sure the thumb drive would read appropriately.
4. I then uninstalled my HDD drive and installed my new SSD drive into the bay that the HDD drive had come out of.
5. I plugged my thumb drive in along with the newly installed SSD drive and powered up.
6. Asus Backtracker started up but then gave me an error that it could not read from the USB thumb drive.

but the result is the same.
Tried several USB 3.0&2.0 flash drives on all USB ports on laptop,and 2 different SSD (EVO 840 & SANDISK ULTRA ii) but all attempts failed.
And showed me the same error.....

43816

Any thoughts on what I can do next?

hmscott
12-03-2014, 05:55 AM
i did like advised me previously,
1. I downloaded Asus Backtracker after reading these forums.
2. I installed Asus Backtracker on a Sansdisk Cruzer 32gb thumb drive that I just bought that is usb 3.0 and 2.0 compatible.
3. I returned my factory HDD to factory default using the Backtracker off my thumb drive without issue to make sure the thumb drive would read appropriately.
4. I then uninstalled my HDD drive and installed my new SSD drive into the bay that the HDD drive had come out of.
5. I plugged my thumb drive in along with the newly installed SSD drive and powered up.
6. Asus Backtracker started up but then gave me an error that it could not read from the USB thumb drive.

but the result is the same.
Tried several USB 3.0&2.0 flash drives on all USB ports on laptop,and 2 different SSD (EVO 840 & SANDISK ULTRA ii) but all attempts failed.
And showed me the same error.....

43816

Any thoughts on what I can do next?

ammar, answered first post here:

http://rog.asus.com/forum/showthread.php?54292-G751JT-CH71-Asus-Backtracker-to-SSD-problem&p=454279&viewfull=1#post454279