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Irrition
12-02-2014, 06:41 AM
Hi guys, I've recently been looking up on laptops, and i realized my current configuration (ASUS G56JR) can emit temperatures from 80 degrees celsius up to 90 degrees celsius when playing games like Dota 2, CS:GO on maxed out settings. This laptop is only 6 months old.

The laptop is the basic ASUS G56JR, with
i7 4700 processor, (Quad Core)
16 GB DDR3 RAM (8GB x 2 slots)
NVIDIA GTX 760M GPU
Crucial MX100 512 GB SSD

Does anyone here have the same experience? I tried decreasing anti-aliasing for CS:GO and decreasing FPS Max rates to 60, and it managed to decrease temperatures from 90 degrees celsius to 80ish, while for Dota 2 and other games (even games that are really old and not too graphics intensive like Heroes of Might and Magic V - temperatures can go up to 85 degrees celsius and 90). These temperatures are mostly boostered by high temperatures of the i7 processor and the Motherboard. Graphics card temperature seems to range from 70 to 80 during gaming. All measurements were done through the program Speccy.

In idle, the temperature is about 45 - 55 degrees celsius on average.
Room temperature is about 27 degrees to 30 degrees celsius on average.

Anyone here has any clues as to what is going on or are these temperatures really just meant to be O_O

BabiMonster
12-03-2014, 04:37 AM
Same issue here. I have Asus G56JR-CN260H.
While Gaming, CPU and MOTHERBOARD temp raise up to 85c-93c Both. The GPU is 59c-65c Average.. This laptop Age arround 5 month.
When idle, CPU and MOTHERBOARD temp is 45c-50c Both, ang GPU is 45c.

Why CPU and MOTHERBOARD Temp is so high? is that normal for a gaming laptop?

hmscott
12-03-2014, 07:21 AM
Guys, all the 15" laptops struggle to cool the high end components, the space to work with is just too small to keep it as cool as the 17" laptops. There is more room to work with in the large open space of the full 17" chassis. The flat thin 17" have even more problems than the 15" fat chassis - they often throttle under load.

So far neither of you have mentioned Thermal Throttling, the first sign things are running hotter than the CPU likes it. The CPU usually throttles starting around 94c, and that reduces performance noticeably until the temperature drops again.

You can use hwinfo64 to track and log Thermal Throttling events, along with temperature and a bunch of other readings. Then after a gaming run, benchmark run, daily use, you can load up the log in a .csv reader like Excel and get averages, peaks, etc and have a time to correlate the event. Quite often a peak temperature will only be reached briefly, and the log will show most of the time the temperatures were actually quite low/normal. The peaks have time next to them so we can try to associate an event that caused the peak.

hwinfo64 download
http://www.hwinfo.com/download.php

Notice the 4 lines of Thermal Throttling info in this example, all No, if you see a Yes ever, then turn on logging (green +) to find out how often and when it is Thermal Throttling.

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You can also tune the CPU with Intel Extreme Tuning Utility to increase performance / multiplier on Cores 1/2 and reduce performance / multiplier on Cores 3/4 (maybe just 4) to keep heavy loads from overheating and going into Thermal Throttling.

If you start with a max of 36x/35x/34x/34x Cores and 36x CPU cache, try setting 36x/35x/30x/30x to start to see if that is enough - then raise the multiplier on Core 3 until your normal work load has best performance without throttling.

Intel XTU also lets you reduce the CPU voltage through an offset of negative voltage. A range of -20mv to -125mV has been report stable and successful at reducing temperature idle and load.

Intel XTU is also now included with the G751, but you can download it from here if you don't have it, or need an update, the latest is currently 5.1.1.25
https://downloadcenter.intel.com/SearchResult.aspx?lang=eng&keyword=xtu

You can help the temps as well by keeping the area around and under the laptop cool and clear of obstructions so the bottom vent can pull in air - that is the main air intake. Keep the exhaust vents away from walls or other obstructions that may bounce back hot air under the laptop and through the air intakes, increasing the ambient temperature the cooling system sees.

You should rarely need to redo the thermal paste used on the CPU/GPU. The stuff Asus uses seals itself from the environment so it doesn't dry out, even after years of use.

Many aftermarket thermal materials dry out and have to be re-applied often, some as often as 3 months - so do your research before repasting - you may be entering into a constant cycle of paste reapplication to get the improvement you originally experienced. Some do last longer, MX-4 seems good. I use AS-5, but I haven't had a need to re-paste an Asus ROG laptop, ever.

Disassembling your laptop to re paste voids your warranty; Asus has a little sticker over a CPU plate screw, or presents another such obstruction to accessing the cooling system for dis-assembly. It's easy to damage internal components in the process of re-pasting. There are lots of potential disasters that you can induce by re-pasting.

If you use an outside 3rd party to re-paste for you, and they aren't an authorized Asus support center, your warranty is void, and unless they specialize in Asus support they might mess up just as likely as you.

While you are under warranty you can ask Asus to re-paste for you if they verify your tests and CPU temps, so make sure your readings are reproducible on demand - if you are experiencing the high temps in games, find a benchmark or stress test that shows the same kind of problem - something Asus can use to reproduce the temps - they aren't going to game like you to get the reading they need a shared tool that both of you can run in a short test to see the same problem you are seeing.

Generally it is entering Thermal Throttling under normal use that will get Asus to re-paste for you. But, Asus has been known to re-paste if you insist you believe the temps are too high.

If you only use gaming as the benchmark for temperature, you can call any reading any way you like. I have seen people repast and insist their new temps are lower, when in fact they are almost exactly the same. But, if they are happy with the outcome, I don't bring it up. They key is to get happy with what you have, or let it bug you incessantly :)

Re-pasting can get you a few degrees less temperature, and if there wasn't a high cost in dis-assembly and reassembly of those delicate components, I would recommend everyone do it, just for the experience - it's fun :)

Please do share your own temps and test results, images of the results like this are helpful:

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Irrition
12-08-2014, 03:59 AM
Hi hmscott, Thanks for the insights.

I've run the Log for a game of DotA 2 and i've managed to find out that i have thermal throttling half the time i'm playing the game on maxed out settings. Thermal throttling is on core 1,2, and 4. Mostly, the game throttles on cores 1 and 2, and on 4, it only slightly throttled, with 3 having no throttles at all. I'm pretty sure a laptop of this configuration should be able to play DotA 2 on max settings with no problem, or at least without having to escalate to such high temperatures, since DotA 2 isn't even that graphics intensive. Is there something wrong?

hmscott
12-08-2014, 04:13 AM
Hi hmscott, Thanks for the insights.

I've run the Log for a game of DotA 2 and i've managed to find out that i have thermal throttling half the time i'm playing the game on maxed out settings. Thermal throttling is on core 1,2, and 4. Mostly, the game throttles on cores 1 and 2, and on 4, it only slightly throttled, with 3 having no throttles at all. I'm pretty sure a laptop of this configuration should be able to play DotA 2 on max settings with no problem, or at least without having to escalate to such high temperatures, since DotA 2 isn't even that graphics intensive. Is there something wrong?

Irrition, which model ROG laptop do you have? What is the temperature of the CPU during the Thermal Throttling events? For G750's the 93c/94c point is where it starts.

Are you running Intel Extreme Tuning Utility to adjust the multipliers or adjust the voltage offset? What version is it? Some JX users experienced thermal throttling well before the 93c starting point. Uninstalling that version (don't recall, it was a while ago) stopped the Thermal Throttling. It hasn't been reported since, but it is possible if you have a JX and an old version of XTU installed.

If it is Thermal Throttling, your cooling isn't working well, that can be due to many things - the only ones you can control are the ambient temperature (room temperature) and making sure the air intake vent on the bottom of the computer is clear for drawing air - don't put it on the bed/couch as the cloth with block the air intake - and make sure the hot exhaust air isn't being bounced back into the air intake - turn the laptop so the exhaust vents are exhausting hot air to open space not a wall or other obstruction.

If the intake/exhaust are clear, and you are still getting thermal throttling, you need to return to the seller if you are still in the return period, usually 7-14 days, but sometimes up to 30 days, or RMA to Asus if you are outside the seller's return period.

https://vip.asus.com <== create a login, register your laptop, and file a Technical Inquiry clearly stating the problem and details of what you measured/tried and attach any photo's or image grabs in a zipfile.

Please come back and let us know how this works out for you :)

Irrition
12-08-2014, 04:18 AM
Hi hmscott,

My model ROG is ASUS G56JR - CN 273H.
I'm not using any Intel Extreme Tuning Utility program and i have not tampered with the Voltage or Multiplier settings. From prior experience, the temperature during my game sessions of DotA should be within 80 to 90 degrees celsius, (Speccy has never recorded a 93 or 94). So i believe thermal throttling is occuring before hitting the 93/94 celsius region, if that isn't the case, it means Speccy is registering the temperature wrongly. However i do feel my palm rests heating up on the left side of the laptop(which is nearer to the heatsink).

hmscott
12-08-2014, 04:31 AM
Hi hmscott,

My model ROG is ASUS G56JR - CN 273H.
I'm not using any Intel Extreme Tuning Utility program and i have not tampered with the Voltage or Multiplier settings. From prior experience, the temperature during my game sessions of DotA should be within 80 to 90 degrees celsius, (Speccy has never recorded a 93 or 94). So i believe thermal throttling is occuring before hitting the 93/94 celsius region, if that isn't the case, it means Speccy is registering the temperature wrongly. However i do feel my palm rests heating up on the left side of the laptop(which is nearer to the heatsink).

Irrition, I have explained what I can in the post #3 above.

Perhaps the G56R Thermal Throttling starts earlier than in the G750/G751? Whatever point it is triggered, it is happening, and reducing your CPU performance, so it isn't a desirable result.

Your G56R is Thermal Throttling, I wouldn't keep a laptop that Thermal Throttles under normal use, and I am not sure if all G56R's Thermal Throttle normally, or if your unit has a particular problem.

You could try swapping it for another one if you are still in the return period, or RMA to Asus for repair.

When you send in a laptop for heat issues, like Thermal Throttling, it helps if you show Asus the results of standard benchmark / stress tests, so they can replicate the problem. Asus isn't going to play DOTA2 to recreate the problem :)

I use prime95 running 8 threads of Small FFT (generates high power draw / heat). You could run hwinfo64 side by side to get the results in a Snipping Tool screen grab to attach to the Technical Inquiry you file with Asus requesting the RMA, attach as a zipfile.

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Sorry to hear about this, I hope it can be fixed, please come back and let us know how it works out for you.

hmscott
12-08-2014, 04:57 AM
Irrition, sorry about the posts, editing and changing, please refresh to get the updated posts.

At first I didn't catch you were the OP posting again, it had been a while since I posted to this thread last.

The smaller thinner laptops don't have the volume inside to provide adequate cooling, at least not adequate to trying to fit high a performance CPU/GPU in them.

Gigabyte, Razer, MSI, Apple etc all have problems keeping their components running at full speed under load - they can all exhibit Thermal Throttling, and/or they detune performance on their own to get ahead of the thermal throttling.

Asus usually won't ship a design that Thermal Throttles, but perhaps this is a new trend as demand for thin small laptops with the performance of normally large laptops continues.

But, I can't recall seeing anyone go to the trouble of looking for Thermal Throttling on a G5x laptop before you, so I can't tell if this is normal, or a problem.

The good news is that the new G751 cooling system is much smaller and works as good as the larger implementation in the G750, so perhaps that expertise will move down into the smaller thinner laptops soon. Images here:

http://rog.asus.com/forum/showthread.php?54449-ASUS-G750JY-a-slap-in-the-face-to-G751-owners&p=455187&viewfull=1#post455187

Please keep us posted, and if anyone else with a G5x laptop is reading this, please test for Thermal Throttling and post your results.