PDA

View Full Version : CPU temp hits 100 degrees



evezy123
12-05-2014, 12:21 PM
Hi I have a G750 and when I play games on performance mode after about an hour my cpu gets to 100 degrees. is this normal or is there something wrong

hmscott
12-05-2014, 03:00 PM
Hi I have a G750 and when I play games on performance mode after about an hour my cpu gets to 100 degrees. is this normal or is there something wrong

evezy123, sorry to hear that, and no if that is 100c it shouldn't happen. If you go past 94c the CPU Thermal Throttles, and you lose performance.

We need to know more about what you are running. What is the exact model you have? For example I have a G750JH-DB71

What are you running when the temperature gets that hight? What is your ambient room temperature?

How long have you had the G750xx-XXXX ? Does the laptop turn off or graphics driver crash (says restarting driver) ?

Usually a temperature that high means you need to return it to the seller for another one if you are in the seller return period, usually 7-15 days, sometimes as long as 30 days. Otherwise you need to RMA it back to Asus to get it fixed.

Someone will answer you when you fill in the blanks. I will look for your response, but may miss it before others can answer.

evezy123
12-05-2014, 06:59 PM
Hi i have a g750 jm thé cpu hits 100 degrees whilst gaming on High performance, on all thé latest High end games, i have no driver crashes or blues screens at all all i can tell is that the cpu fan maxes out. The laptop has recently came back from repair where the motherboard was replaced for a faulty subwoofer, could this be the reason?

hmscott
12-06-2014, 01:55 AM
Hi i have a g750 jm thé cpu hits 100 degrees whilst gaming on High performance, on all thé latest High end games, i have no driver crashes or blues screens at all all i can tell is that the cpu fan maxes out. The laptop has recently came back from repair where the motherboard was replaced for a faulty subwoofer, could this be the reason?

evezy123, the temperature before you sent it for the subwoofer replacement was ok?

evezy123
12-06-2014, 02:14 AM
Yes before the motherboard was replaced the temps were fine

hmscott
12-06-2014, 02:36 AM
Yes before the motherboard was replaced the temps were fine

evezy123, it sounds like something happened during the dis-assembly of the laptop to repair the subwoofer caused this new problem. Unassociated problems can occur to anyone when doing dis-assembly of a laptop, even the pro's. It is likely something went out of alignment, and isn't transferring heat as well as before.

File another RMA telling Asus of the new problem that didn't exist before the previous RMA, and ask them to fix it.

This happens sometimes, it's annoying, but Asus will fix it.

evezy123
12-06-2014, 07:47 AM
Ok thanks I'll send another rma, maybe third time lucky lol

Darnassus
12-06-2014, 08:37 AM
............ why in hellfire did they replace the motherboard? The Subwoofer is a completely SEPARATE part! Unless the jack it plugs into was damaged or something, this doesn't sound like it's warrant for a motherboard replacement.

Either way, what ever they did, it sounds like they've given you a real bad paste job.. which is really, really annoying. You could try repaste yourself if confident. We can give you step by step guidance, though of course.. talk about the process with us and tell us your current IT experience before actually dismantling your unit.

Otherwise, RMA again.. :c

hmscott
12-06-2014, 08:46 AM
Ok thanks I'll send another rma, maybe third time lucky lol

evezy123, ouch, 3rd time... sigh.

Be sure and mention that detail high up in the RMA text, asking Please, Get it Right This time :)

Once you have taken on the task of fixing it yourself, or even paying another service to do it (re-pasting) the warranty is void and Asus can tell you sorry but no more RMA to them under warranty - you might as well send it off to Asus again - it might be a bad part, not just the pasting that needs replacing.

These cooling components can be put under stress as assembled, and shipping can make them pop - de-mate them - it might have tested fine on the Bench at Asus. Shipping torqued it out of alignment.

Hang in there, and please come back and let us know how it works out.

Update: This is why you don't want to open the laptop, let Asus handle the repairs and inspections while under warranty.

[HELP!] Warranty declined on two monts old G750JZ
http://rog.asus.com/forum/showthread.php?54434-HELP!-Warranty-declined-on-two-monts-old-G750JZ&p=455068&viewfull=1#post455068

You might think, well I won't tell Asus I opened it, but any technician that sits there and does nothing but open RMA'd laptops all day is going to know if someone other than an experienced tech opened it up, and even an experienced tech is going to leave mar traces on fittings. If you do open it up, you need to tell them - be honest, as they are going to know if you deny it. It's best to not do it at all.

Asus won't always deny warranty for opening, as long as you don't damage something they are forgiving, but for some reason in this case they are either having a bad day, or think whatever was done did break something - right or wrong, Asus are the arbiters of what user tampering invalidates the warranty, and what doesn't.

evezy123
12-06-2014, 09:44 AM
............ why in hellfire did they replace the motherboard? The Subwoofer is a completely SEPARATE part! Unless the jack it plugs into was damaged or something, this doesn't sound like it's warrant for a motherboard replacement.

Either way, what ever they did, it sounds like they've given you a real bad paste job.. which is really, really annoying. You could try repaste yourself if confident. We can give you step by step guidance, though of course.. talk about the process with us and tell us your current IT experience before actually dismantling your unit.

Otherwise, RMA again.. :c

im not too sure I was just told the subwoofer was replaced the motherboard was replaced and so was the bottom cover of the laptop, as they did a bad job of peeling of the warranty stickers and trying to stick them onto the new case

evezy123
12-06-2014, 09:56 AM
so what temps should I be looking to get? would it help if I disabled turbo boost and set the cooling policy to slow the cpu before ramping up the fans?

hmscott
12-06-2014, 12:29 PM
so what temps should I be looking to get? would it help if I disabled turbo boost and set the cooling policy to slow the cpu before ramping up the fans?

evezy123, what you suggest is the only work around before sending it in for repair, but you wouldn't want to keep the laptop long term running like that. The CPU setting would be too slow to take advantage of the GPU. The CPU needs to be able to run at full speed while rendering on the GPU, running the CPU slower would starve the GPU for work and it would run slower too.

But, if you are trying to make it work over the weekend before shipping on Monday, here is what I would do.

1) Uninstall Power4Gear so you can manually set a Power Plan that stays in use after setting it.

2) Use the Power Saver Plan, set CPU Performance Min/Max to 0%/99% to disable Turbo - the Power Saver Plan is most aggressive at keeping the CPU running under 1Ghz, and only ramps up the CPU frequency grudgingly. This will keep the CPU coolest. Set the CPU Cooling in the power plan to Active.

3) You could try using XTU to set the Dynamic Voltage Offset to -20mV to -125mV to reduce heat even more, but not sure if it is worth the effort if #2 keeps it cool enough.

4) Watch the temps with hwinfo64 with logging on. Read the saved .csv logfile occasionally - use notepad to open and do a global replace on all semi-colons ; with commas , and save to another file name. When you open in Excell or another spreadsheet .csv program the comma's will provide better column separators for reading. And look for sustained temperatures, not just peaks.

5) Don't do any of this, and just box up the laptop for shipping Monday. No sense stressing the CPU at or near 100c, since Asus might re-paste the motherboard with the soldered CPU and that same CPU is the one you will get back.

Where did you purchase it? If from a brick and mortar store, try taking it back there and complain that Asus is giving you the run around and you are about to need to return it for repair a 3rd time, and you would like to get another new boxed unit from the seller. Amazon may listen to this complaint too - especially if you used Amazon Prime. newegg would just look at you funny, but it might be worth a try too if you buy a lot of stuff from them.

Good luck!

evezy123
12-06-2014, 07:02 PM
Ok thanks I'll give that a try for now what should the temps be roughly

hmscott
12-07-2014, 01:36 AM
Ok thanks I'll give that a try for now what should the temps be roughly

evezy123, you want the temps under the Thermal Throttling point, which is about 94c. The CPU will protect itself when it gets too hot, and shutdown performance, and finally completely, that is called Thermal Throttling.

By setting the stuff above, it is all a convenient point to set well below that point, I hope. If it is still getting hot enough to thermal throttle, then I would stop using it.

Use hwinfo64 to log readings, and look at them. If you see a peak reading too high, that is the signal to log and look at a sample of readings to make sure it isn't staying at high temps all the time. If it is just hitting the peaks occasionally that is ok, but if it is hanging out above 90c all the time, then stop using it.

You can help by not playing games that are so intense, and/or set vsync to reduce frame rate runaway for older games, you don't need to have the fps in the hundreds, just somewhere around 69fps.