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View Full Version : ASUS G750xx inherent case design flaw degrading the CPU thermal cooling over time



TrickOrTreat
02-12-2015, 08:17 PM
I've just responded to a post in another thread with similar message/info. I think topic is fairly important enough to have it posted in this new thread by itself as it pertains to a design flaw affecting CPU performance over time that all ASUS G750xx owners needs to know about and how to prevent their CPU performance from degrading.

In my opinion, all of the ASUS G750xx laptops have an inherent case design flaw degrading the CPU thermal cooling over time if the laptop owner does not proactively take preventative measures. To expand, the inherent case design flaw is a result of where ASUS placed the Kensington security lock with a small hole/opening, which is at the left rear corner right next to the CPU thermal cooling components (e.g., cooling fins, fan and exhaust opening). And as a result of their placement of the Kensington security lock with the small opening, that small opening allows unfiltered air to be easily sucked directly into the laptop because it is located right next to the CPU cooling fan.

I've opened up my 8 months old G750 laptop and found an incredibly dusty CPU fan, which looked like it was from a CPU fan belonging to a 4 year old laptop, not an 8 months old laptop. Surprisingly, my GPU fan was very clean with almost no dust at all. Anyway, I cleaned all of the internals with a blower and taped up the Kensington lock opening to prevent future unfiltered air from being sucked into to the CPU cooling components. In the future, I also plan to open up my G750 to replace the CPU & GPU thermal compound as well as placing my own additional copper heatsinks to the CPU/GPU cooling components.

code9523
02-13-2015, 12:40 AM
Hi! I'll tell one secret about this laptop! There are planty of holes where the dust may come in to it and seat on radiators! You called cpu degrading but it is a thermal throttling process and after cleaning and repasting will gone for another 8 - 12 month. Your gpu cooler is cleaner because it spins mostly under serious loads (games graphic etc...) and cpu cooler spins almost always when laptop is on))) Don't panic it's a normal when there is a dust inside a laptop just remember temps when it's clean and repasted and check them every 2 month if they grows a lot it's cleaning time)))
PS I don't recommend you to put extra copper in to your laptop because it will store more heat inside and better will be to put it outside it's body.
The engineers in asus are not idiots and they done wary good cooling design in 750xx like in all rog laptops since g74xx.

TrickOrTreat
02-13-2015, 01:40 AM
Hi! I'll tell one secret about this laptop! There are planty of holes where the dust may come in to it and seat on radiators! You called cpu degrading but it is a thermal throttling process and after cleaning and repasting will gone for another 8 - 12 month. Your gpu cooler is cleaner because it spins mostly under serious loads (games graphic etc...) and cpu cooler spins almost always when laptop is on))) Don't panic it's a normal when there is a dust inside a laptop just remember temps when it's clean and repasted and check them every 2 month if they grows a lot it's cleaning time)))
PS I don't recommend you to put extra copper in to your laptop because it will store more heat inside and better will be to put it outside it's body.
The engineers in asus are not idiots and they done wary good cooling design in 750xx like in all rog laptops since g74xx.


Hi code9523,

Thank you the reply and your suggestions. With respect to your advice about extra copper heatsinks might potentially store more heat inside the case and I've also been thinking about that possible issue as well. I was thinking about buying one of those laptop cooling fan that helps extract more hot air via the CPU/GPU exhaust vents as a way to get more air flow through the heatsinks and out the case.


With respect to the problem with the dusty CPU cooling components (e.g., CPU fan, heatsink fins, etc..), I believe the problem is at least 95% the result of the Kensington security lock opening. The reason why I strongly believe this is the case is because I use my own semi-custom laptop cooler that blows filtered air (MERV 9 filtration level) up the bottom of my case. Since I also have a desktop and when it's busy rending/encoding video, I would use my G750, mainly for gaming and for video editing/rendering with GPU acceleration feature, my G750's GeForce GTX 770M gets a lot of use. The inside of my G750 had virtually no dust at all (almost spotless), except for the region of CPU Fan and the related cooling components. That tells me that the unfiltered opening associated with the Kensington security lock situated next to the CPU fan is the culprit. Since I've already taped up that Kensington lock opening, I'll follow-up in 3-6 months to provide an update and tell you if the CPU cooling component region is clean or dusty.


Cheers!

aoryx
02-13-2015, 03:53 PM
this is interesting, have u tried only to block the Kingston opening, and monitor the temp and dust accumulation in 2 months?

TrickOrTreat
02-15-2015, 01:31 AM
this is interesting, have u tried only to block the Kingston opening, and monitor the temp and dust accumulation in 2 months?



Hi aoryx,

I had just recently (last week) found out about the dusty CPU cooling component. Last week, I was thinking about the notion of repasting the CPU/GPU with IC Diamond thermal compound and possibly attaching additional copper heatsinks to the G750's existing heatsinks/cooling fins/pipes in the future, so I decided to disassemble my G750 to the extent of being able to view the CPU/GPU cooling components to determine what I needed to buy before I begin this new project. Before this recent disassembly, I had only opened upped the G750's back cover to add an SDD and HDD as well as replacing the ODD with an HDD/SDD caddy.

Anyway, I have now cleaned the CPU cooling components with an air blower and Q-tip, blocked the Kensington security lock opening with black electrical tape and started to record the CPU temperatures. I was planning to wait at least 3 months to give it adequate time for any possible dust build up as well as having time to see changes in temp data before I disassemble my G750 again to inspect for dust buildup, and to start the thermal compound repasting of the CPU/GPU heatsinks project.

I'll post a follow-up in a few months to update everyone about my findings.


Cheers!

beatc
02-15-2015, 02:42 AM
Good job. I'll be waiting for the updates.