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View Full Version : G20AJ System Upgrade Procedure



GoHack
02-13-2015, 05:21 AM
I went and did an upgrade to my G20 today, adding 16GB memory, a 128GB SSD, and replacing my GeForce GTX 750 w/a GeForce GTX 670.

I took some photos, but sadly, my cell phone went dead, but will post what I have later.


First thing, you will need a jewelers Philips head screw driver set, a small regular Philips screw driver, and a small straight screw driver, a small jar or old prescription bottle, for the screws to be kept. Be careful, they are small. Both power supplies, the 180W and 230W, and depending on what video card you have, as much as two video card power supply wires, one six pin and one eight pin, which came in the shipping box. The eight pin can be used as both a six or eight pin.

The system w/the Nvidia GTX 750 comes w/two wires, but for anything better, most likely just one, unless it came w/a 780 or 980, where there is most likely none, because they are already on the video card in the system.

NOTE: Before powering down your system, go into the BIOS and set it to the Basic Optimal Settings, and save.

Before I go any further, I'm not responsible for any damages to your system, nor mistakes done. I'm just explaining, as best I can, the process that I did, as accurately as I can. With that said, let's begin.


First thing first, disconnect everything from the computer, including the power supply(s).

Remove the top grill, the one w/the heat sink under it. This can be easily done from the back, where there is a small slot, where you can stick your finger nail into and easily ply the grill off carefully.

Next, there are two small screws holding the cover on, one on the top and one on the bottom, but before we get going here, on the bottom there is a special sticker or seal that if ripped shows that the case has been opened. This can be easily lifted off the cover end, w/o damage, and add some wax paper behind it, if you want to preserve it, or if you don't care, then simply break the seal.

Remove the screws, using the appropriate size screwdriver to fit the screw head, , and "CAREFULLY" slide the cover towards the front of the case. Once done, "CAREFULLY" lift the cover off, because underneath are some small thin wires for the case lights. Carefully, disconnect the two wires at the plugs. The wires are numbered, wire 1 connects to wire 1, and wire 2 connects to wire 2. Once disconnected, lay the cover off to the side. As for the wires coming out of the case, carefully move them out of the way so that they will not be damaged.

VIDEO CARD:

The video card is probably the easiest to attack. So first remove the rear red back panel by removing three screws, one on the bottom, one in the middle, and one at the top. Once done, carefully lift the back off and place off to the side.

Next there are three screws holding the video card support bracket in, two towards the front of the case, and one in the back at the bottom. Remove them. Next unlock the video card inside at the PCIE slot on the motherboard, by carefully pushing down on the yellow lock or latch, towards the front of end the slot. Once done, carefully pry the card out. If you have the GTX 750 Card, there are no wires attached to the card, but w/any other, like a GTX 760, they will most likely have one or two wire sets attached, so be careful pulling the card out. Disconnect the wire(s) from the video card, by pressing the locks on the attached wire plug(s), and pulling the plug(s) out of the video card.

Remove the Black Plastic Support from the back of the video card, if it came w/one. The GTX 750 doesn't have one. Next, using the small regular Philips screw driver, remove the screw(s) from the back of the card, disconnect the video card from the support bracket.

With the new video card, do the reverse, and reassemble. There's a PCIE 90 degree adapter attached to the old video card, press the lock piece and pull from video card and attach to the new card.

If the card that was pulled had two power cable attached to it, reattach them to the new card the same as the other was. Of course they could be either two six pin plugs or one six pin and one eight.

If the card came w/only one wire attach, chances are, it was a six pin plug, and you should of gotten another wire for your system in the shipping box, most likely an eight pin socket one. The eight pin can be used as either an eight or six. Attach one end to the open plug on the bottom of the motherboard next to the other one, it'll most like be the eight pin one, and connect the other end to the video card.

The video cards come w/no plugs, a single six pin plug, two six pin plugs, or one six pin and one eight pin plug.

Note: If the system came w/only one power supply, there's a jumper on the motherboard which will need to be changed, right next to the power supply plugs. Move the Jumper from the back to the middle pin, to the middle to front one.

Install the new card into the system, it's going to be tight, and not too easy, but make sure that you get the PCIE Male Plug inserted into the female on the motherboard. Once in, and the mounting screw support holes are lined up, reinstall the screws. Be sure to relock the latch on the PCIE slot by lifting it up w/a small screw driver.

Now reassemble everything, reattach, carefully, the two light wires, 1 to 1, and 2 to 2. Attach the cover, and hook back up your keyboard and such, including the two power supplies. Connect the video to the built in video connector, rather than your new video card for now, and power up.

The system should boot up using the built in display. Once in Windows, go into your Device Manager and see if the new card is seen there. If so, go to Windows Update, and Check for Updates, at which time, the Nvidia driver will show. Download and run. One the drive is installed, right click on the screen to see if the Nvidia Control Panel shows. If it does, shut the system down, and connect the video display to the new video card. Turn back on, and the display will be running on the new graphics card.

If anyone sees any mistakes, or wish to edit, please do.


I hope this helps people.

I'll do a write up on the memory and SSD upgrade over the weekend.


UPDATE: Here's some things I forgot to mention. You will also need a pair of pliers. Reason, the screws are all held in w/Loctite. Take the screw driver, place it in the screw, and pressing on it firmly, use the pliers and grip the screw driver, and turn it. It doesn't take much force. You should feel it break, at which point, it should come out w/o any trouble. Be careful, you don't want to strip the screw head.

Next, if your system came w/the Geforce GTX 750, possibly on some others as well, on the inside of the case cover, where the vents or cutouts for the cooling fans line up with, the one for the video card has a grill over the opening. You will need to remove that by removing one screw, and pulling the grill. This is to allow the maximum amount of air flow for the video card.

By the way, the longest screws lengths go to the case cover, there are two of them, so don't use them elsewhere. Keep them separated. The rest appear to be all the same size. Again, they are ALL small, so keep them in a container, like an old prescription bottle.

toronto699
02-13-2015, 03:55 PM
GoHack thanks great write up

zhangyifu
02-13-2015, 10:00 PM
Super helpful.

Bodycount69
02-14-2015, 07:41 PM
Need Videos not write ups :( and why did you go with a slower card ???

GoHack
02-14-2015, 10:34 PM
Need Videos not write ups :( and why did you go with a slower card ???

1st, I already had the 670, and 2nd, it's a faster card than the 750 and 760, and in some cases, even the 770. The 670, 760, and the 770 all use the same video chip, the GK104. All Nvideo did was to tweak the card a little, and rename it, from the 600 series to the 700. When the 700 series came out, the price of the 600 series went down, so that the price to performance of the 670 was better than the 770.

Nvidia is notorious for doing that, check on the chipsets when looking at their cards.

As for a video, I'm sorry, but I've never made one, but hey, how about you making the video then, instead of yelling at others for it? If you don't like my write up, then don't use it. At least other people appreciate it. I didn't have to spend the time to write it up.

Sick_G20
02-15-2015, 02:42 AM
GoHack, your write up is very helpful thanks for taking the time to do it..wondering if you'll be able to access/ post the pics you took of the process..more info and visuals the better..thx again

Bodycount69
02-15-2015, 12:51 PM
1st, I already had the 670, and 2nd, it's a faster card than the 750 and 760, and in some cases, even the 770. The 670, 760, and the 770 all use the same video chip, the GK104. All Nvideo did was to tweak the card a little, and rename it, from the 600 series to the 700. When the 700 series came out, the price of the 600 series went down, so that the price to performance of the 670 was better than the 770.

Nvidia is notorious for doing that, check on the chipsets when looking at their cards.

As for a video, I'm sorry, but I've never made one, but hey, how about you making the video then, instead of yelling at others for it? If you don't like my write up, then don't use it. At least other people appreciate it. I didn't have to spend the time to write it up.

LOL chill dude its not that I don't like the write up I do just wishing for a video thats all thanks for your info it will help me when I rip mine apart :)

GoHack
02-15-2015, 06:24 PM
http://rog.asus.com/forum/attachment.php?attachmentid=46459&d=1424022891&thumb=1&stc=1

Photo #1 - This is the Tamper Sticker on the bottom of the case.

Photo#2 - There is a single screw on the bottom of the case which will need to be removed, as well as one on the top, under the removalable grill there.

Photo #3 - After removing the two screws, slide the cover towards the front of the case, or in the photo, towards the right. As you can see on the left in the photo, or the back of the case, the cover is opening up. Lift the cover off the computer case carefully, because under it are some wires for the lights on the cover.

Photo #4 - This photo shows the cover off at the top, w/two wires running from it.

Photo #5 - Here's a closer view of the two wires and their white connectors, w/the labels shown. The white connectors have to be "CAREFULLY" detached from each other. Once again, be careful, because the wires are small and could be easily broken.

Once the wires are disconnected, place the cover off to the side.

As for the wires coming off the motherboard, place them out of the way where they won't get damaged.

toronto699
02-15-2015, 07:24 PM
GoHack thanks

GoHack
02-15-2015, 07:48 PM
https://rog.asus.com/forum/attachment.php?attachmentid=46474&d=1424027378&thumb=1&stc=1

The three photos below is all I have for removing the video card, due to my cell phone going dead.

Photo #3 - The last photo here shows the rear red grill, w/the case cover on. This needs to be removed in order to remove the video card. With the case cover off, there are three screws holding the rear grill on, one on the very bottom, one in the middle, and on the top. Once the screws are removed, carefully lift the rear grill off from the top on down.

Photo #1 - This shows two screws holding on the video card support, towards the front of the case.

Photo #2 - Shows one holding the video card support in the rear.

From here, follow my directions above for removing the card.

bensetsfire
02-21-2015, 05:34 AM
Thanks so much for the walkthrough GoHack, upgraded my GPU to an EVGA GTX970 FTW today. So far everything seems pretty good. Was a little tough getting the card in once and for all, but overall it went pretty smooth.

GoHack
02-27-2015, 03:46 AM
Thanks so much for the walkthrough GoHack, upgraded my GPU to an EVGA GTX970 FTW today. So far everything seems pretty good. Was a little tough getting the card in once and for all, but overall it went pretty smooth.

I'm glade to have helped.

Enjoy.

GoHack
03-01-2015, 05:55 PM
47024

There are two (2) screws holding on this bracket over the Heatsink.

CAREFULLY, lift up and remove the black plastic material from the Heat Sink/ Fan Assembly for later use. Using a heat gun or a portable hair dryer might help, and put it in a clean place so that the adhesive doesn't get any dirt on it.

47026

Next there are three (3) screws holding the fan assembly on, two towards the front of the case, or in this case, where the SSD is shown, and one (1) in the back. Remove them and lift the Fan Assembly off and put it on top off the Video Card. There are wires still connected, so be careful not to damage them.

47027

Now you see the Heat Sink Mounting Screws to the CPU, w/the Memory underneath the Heat Sink. Sadly, the only way to remove and install any new memory is by removing the Heat Sink. Before doing so, If you plan to upgrade the CPU as well, your better off doing both at the same time.

I also recommend buying some Thermo Paste, like Arctic Silver 5, a bottle of alcohol, and some Q-Tips, especially if you are replacing the CPU. I'm not going to go into any details w/that, since it is available elsewhere like on Arctic Silver's own web site. If your doing the Memory only, and don't have any Thermo Compound, when you remove the Heat Sink, make sure the expose Thermo Paste on there already doesn't get dirty, either on the CPU side nor the Heat Sink side.

There are four (4) screws holding the Heat Sink on. One screw is fully accessible, two (2) under the Heat Sink Fins, which are accessable through to (2) individual holes in the Fins themselves, and one unfortunately blocked by the DVD.

47028

You will see one screw holding in the DVD in, remove it, and slide the DVD out partially, or as far as the attached wires will allow. You now have access to all four (4) Heat Sink Screws. Loosen up the four screws, and lift off the Heat Sink. You now have access to both the Memory and the CPU. Just like w/the Thermo Compound, I'm not going to go into any detail w/installing, and/or, replacing either of them, since that info is readily available elsewhere as well. Once you have completed what you plan doing, re-attach the Heat Sink. There needs to be Thermo Compound on it, whether the original or new. You need to tighten the screws evenly, one opposite the other, back and forth until all are tight.

Finally, it is just reversing the disassembling process to put everything back together.

bensetsfire
03-02-2015, 07:33 PM
Are you still planning on upgrading your processor GoHack? Or have you already? I'm debating doing so, you laid out how to get there pretty good here, so now I'm really considering it. Hmmm.

GoHack
03-06-2015, 01:55 AM
Are you still planning on upgrading your processor GoHack? Or have you already? I'm debating doing so, you laid out how to get there pretty good here, so now I'm really considering it. Hmmm.

Before doing so, get the second power brick, the 180W, if your system came w/just a 230W brick, or a 230W, if it came w/just the 180W brick. In order words, you need "BOTH" the 180W and 230W bricks, for a total of 410W.

You can find either one on eBay. In one of my postings, I noted the ASUS model number and specs for the 180W brick. Someone else showed the 230W as well.

Good Luck

realfortin
05-27-2015, 12:31 AM
Thanks for the great teardown and instructions. Any chance you will provide an update on getting the SSD in? It would be greatly appreciated.

Dark_Wing35
08-28-2015, 03:14 AM
Thanks for the write up GoHack. Without you saying the jumpers needed to be moved I never would have figured out what I was doing wrong. To anyone else who finds this thread pay attention tho all 6 SIX sets of jumpers. I have seen multiple configurations for different GPUS. My EVGA950 FTW has the top one moved to the front and all of the lower jumpers moved up except for the far last one. Try em out for your specific GPU and this is only if you are adding the second power supply.

a100
09-02-2015, 07:14 PM
Guys any help for removing the Sata 3T and installing a new SSD?

Also removing old HDD and installing the new one is easy? are screw`s reachable? no other drivers for detaching the old SATA needed.?

Nadles
09-02-2015, 09:47 PM
Thanks for the Time & Effort you put forward creating this. Will definitely come in helpful when I decide to pull the Trigger on a 980 TI and the 330W PSU. Would of already bought the GPU if I didn't have to spend another $100 on the PSU, but will definitely soon.