PDA

View Full Version : should i put my battery in the fridge?



GoAsusGo!
03-07-2015, 11:05 PM
i never unplug my laptop from the electric outlet so... should i remove the battery to preserve it? perhaps putting it in the fridge or freezer ??

hmscott
03-08-2015, 07:48 AM
i never unplug my laptop from the electric outlet so... should i remove the battery to preserve it? perhaps putting it in the fridge or freezer ??

GoAsusGo!, no. :)

Leave the battery in, and let the power charging circuit do it's job to keep the battery conditioned.

If you want, buy another battery, and cycle between them. I only do that if I need battery power longer than 1 battery will give me, but it also gives you a back up in case the battery fails - very rare.

Play more games, and read less battery articles ;)

Have fun!

GoAsusGo!
03-08-2015, 06:54 PM
alright.

GoAsusGo!
03-10-2015, 12:00 AM
im open to other peoples suggestions.

i dont use my rog for gaming and i dont use it as a portable.

i want to preserve the battery so ...should i remove it?

GottiBoi55
03-14-2015, 06:22 AM
im open to other peoples suggestions.

i dont use my rog for gaming and i dont use it as a portable.

i want to preserve the battery so ...should i remove it?

Hi GoAsusGo!
Leave the battery in your NB.
Reasons why,
1. If you have a power failure it may damage your NB.
2. If you are working on a project and the power goes out, you can lose all your work.
3. So think of this as a "Battery UPS' you would use on a Desktop PC.

Hope this helps my friend?

GoAsusGo!
03-15-2015, 02:27 AM
thanks for replying... a power failure could damage my notebook?

still open to suggestions on ways to preserve my battery.

hmscott
03-15-2015, 04:20 AM
...still open to suggestions on ways to preserve my battery.

Leave it plugged in :)

BU-808: How to Prolong Lithium-based Batteries
http://www.batteryuniversity.com/learn/article/how_to_prolong_lithium_based_batteries

The article has lots of good data for the engineers that program the charging cycle curves into the charging circuit in your laptop.

That charging circuit is designed to allow the battery to be conditioned in place, not overcharge, but instead to stay within the range of best values programmed into the controller. Allowing the user to keep the battery plugged in and running without user intervention.

Leaving the battery installed, under the power and care of the charging controller in the range of 93%-100% (mine is currently at 98%) is *not* the same as storing a battery on the shelf. A 50% level for batteries might be best while self-discharging on the shelf. But, it isn't the same as under constant watch and adjustment by a well programmed charging circuit.

The article ends with this statement:

“Should I disconnect my laptop from the power grid when not in use?” many ask. Under normal circumstances this should not be necessary because once the lithium-ion battery is full the charger discontinues charge and only engages when the battery voltage drops. Most users do not remove the AC power and I like to believe that this practice is safe.

That is an old article, 2010, battery chemistry and controller expertise has progressed to the point Asus, Apple, and other vendors, now sell laptops with batteries sealed into the laptop / phone / tablet / etc.

There is no need to futz with the battery any longer :)

GoAsusGo!
03-19-2015, 03:34 AM
thank you for your reply.

I read the article you mentioned, though i didnt grasp the data.

Table 3 in the article shows that storing a battery at zero degrees Celsius at 40% charge will keep it well conditioned to hold a 98% charge should you need it in a years time...the key here is the storage temperature and not letting the charge drop below 40% while in storage.. but your saying keeping the battery in my laptop is the next best thing because charging circuits will take care of it (even though its no where near 0 Celsius inside my laptop). and like you said, nowadays, companies dont make laptops or phones with removable batteries.

i'd like to continue this discussion, so again, anyone and everyone is welcome.

hmscott
03-19-2015, 04:54 AM
thank you for your reply.
I read the article you mentioned, though i didnt grasp the data.
Table 3 in the article shows that storing a battery at zero degrees Celsius at 40% charge will keep it well conditioned to hold a 98% charge should you need it in a years time...the key here is the storage temperature and not letting the charge drop below 40% while in storage.. but your saying keeping the battery in my laptop is the next best thing because charging circuits will take care of it (even though its no where near 0 Celsius inside my laptop). and like you said, nowadays, companies dont make laptops or phones with removable batteries.
i'd like to continue this discussion, so again, anyone and everyone is welcome.

GoAsusGo, the optimal temperature for many things is less than ambient temperature, but that doesn't mean it is convenient to use them at those temperatures...

The problems with early materials and chargers that got people thinking that pulling out the battery and running without it would increase battery life time was many years ago. I used to do this for my early Mac laptops. Those batteries were of lead-acid and early NimH materials and chargers with limited sensors and programming - the engineers were just learning how to accomplish the optimal charging for quick charge and long life - mostly learning toward quick charging.

These days, most of those problems have been coded around and materials improved to the point where the improvement gained by removing the battery at 40% charge and putting it in a low temperature environment for storage aren't worth the trouble.

If you have spare batteries, to swap out on field excursions where you need long battery run time - and several batteries to accomplish that run time - you can store those batteries at 40% in a low temperature environment while not in use, then charge to full before the period of use. Because, they would otherwise be self-discharging - without connection to a conditioning charger, like the one in your laptop.

But, in your laptop, you are not self-discharging, your battery is under constant care while plugged in. There is no need to intervene in it's care.

The new G751 has a non-removable battery. You will likely not even have the choice to remove the battery in many laptops from now on.

If you feel so strongly about it, then do it, no one is stopping you, but there is no benefit to doing it, and enough downsides to removing it that it isn't recommended - and hasn't been recommended for many years.

1) removing the battery exposes the contacts in the laptop and on the battery to corrosion and oxidation.

2) damage to the contacts can occur when the battery and laptop contacts are exposed... the laptop contacts and interior parts are open and uncovered when the battery is removed.

3) the laptop power is no longer buffered by the battery, if power drops or the AC power adapter cable is unplugged, the laptop loses power and the OS is interrupted - likely losing work.

4) if a sudden unplanned need for battery power comes up - your battery is only at 40%.

The lifetime of the battery would need to be extended many times before any of the above negatives would be mitigated. It isn't worth it.

You have already lost more time thinking about it, when you could have been doing other things, than saved by any possible value of taking the battery out of the laptop :)

GoAsusGo!
03-20-2015, 04:42 AM
thanks again for your reply.

i dont plan on removing my battery, nor unplugging my laptop.