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View Full Version : How long will my laptop last? (i never turn it off)



GoAsusGo!
04-28-2015, 03:43 PM
I have an ASUS ROG 750jx built in 2013. I'm using it as a media server, so, it is never shutdown or put to sleep... how long will it last?


(my concerns are ...the fans, will the ball bearings wear out... the screen, will the LED burnout... inside, will the thermal paste dry up.. etc etc etc)

Nonpossible
04-28-2015, 09:41 PM
Depends on how cool you're keeping it. I have a Dell from 2008 that runs nearly non-stop without a hitch.
These G750s are pretty sturdy and cool pretty well, you will probably be fine running it nonstop. I would suggest
getting some sort of software to watch your CPU/GPU Temperature and fan speeds.

If you're not using the laptop you can always set your power setting to "do nothing" when you close the lid.
That way windows will run just fine and you wont have to worry about burning out your screen.

GoAsusGo!
04-29-2015, 04:24 PM
Depends on how cool you're keeping it. I have a Dell from 2008 that runs nearly non-stop without a hitch.
These G750s are pretty sturdy and cool pretty well, you will probably be fine running it nonstop. I would suggest
getting some sort of software to watch your CPU/GPU Temperature and fan speeds.

If you're not using the laptop you can always set your power setting to "do nothing" when you close the lid.
That way windows will run just fine and you wont have to worry about burning out your screen.


the computer idles most of the day, so i dont expect the temperature to rise.
but
closing the lid is a good idea, thanks.

Maxter
04-29-2015, 10:47 PM
Actually, closing the lid is not the best idea for laptops. Part of the heat is released through the keyboard area.
The laptop should last maybe 4-5 years constant 24/7 being on... I'm assuming the CPU/GPU will fail first. If too much dust, your fans could suffer too. Clean every 6 months. I would remove the battery in that case (just as a precaution for the battery never undergoing charge-discharge cycles)

GoAsusGo!
04-30-2015, 01:31 PM
Actually, closing the lid is not the best idea for laptops. Part of the heat is released through the keyboard area.
The laptop should last maybe 4-5 years constant 24/7 being on... I'm assuming the CPU/GPU will fail first. If too much dust, your fans could suffer too. Clean every 6 months. I would remove the battery in that case (just as a precaution for the battery never undergoing charge-discharge cycles)


yeah, ill keep the lid up, for ventilation.

4-5 years.. where did you come up with that,
if you dont mind my asking?
and
how does a cpu fail?

I own a number of computers, some of them from the 1990's,
and they all still work...though i have never kept one on 24/7.


when you say "clean" every 6 months.. you mean open up the laptop and clean the fans?
how about putting some mesh infront of the vent, to stop the dust?

and lastely, the battery.
i had a long thread about what to do with the battery and
how to store it. but in the end, we all agreed it was best left in the laptop.

https://rog.asus.com/forum/showthread.php?58762-should-i-put-my-battery-in-the-fridge

but id be happy to hear more about what you think on that topic.

this is super fun

navis995
04-30-2015, 08:16 PM
The only thing that matters are the temperatures.
If they stay low you'll be fine.
You don't need to clean the laptop till you see the sings of excess dust.
You'll know that when you see the fans always running at high speeds or not cooling the way the used to.
Theoretically you should be able to run this for as long as you wish.

Maxter
04-30-2015, 11:17 PM
yeah, ill keep the lid up, for ventilation.

4-5 years.. where did you come up with that,
if you dont mind my asking?
and
how does a cpu fail?

I own a number of computers, some of them from the 1990's,
and they all still work...though i have never kept one on 24/7.


when you say "clean" every 6 months.. you mean open up the laptop and clean the fans?
how about putting some mesh infront of the vent, to stop the dust?

and lastely, the battery.
i had a long thread about what to do with the battery and
how to store it. but in the end, we all agreed it was best left in the laptop.

https://rog.asus.com/forum/showthread.php?58762-should-i-put-my-battery-in-the-fridge

but id be happy to hear more about what you think on that topic.

this is super fun

Server's CPU lifespan is 10 years for being constant on. Will they last longer? likely... but they are made for 10 years. Since these laptops do not have server quality CPU, I assumed ~50% of server life. I got the info from a friend that works at intel. He explained to me that there is a physical change in the CPU as electricity pass through it constantly (I'm no engineer, so I didn't understand much of the exact reason). The CPU will fail when the electrons stop being able to cycle through (that physical change).
Clean every 6 months: use the canned air to clean fans and heatsinks. I do a bi-monthly keyboard/screen cleanup with a screen cleaning solution I got on BestBuy. Dust accumulating in the heatsink of the CPU and GPU are the worse enemy of laptops as they don't allow air flow and this increases the overall working temp of the laptop. With higher working temps, the physical change is exacerbated.
In terms of the battery, once charged, the laptop shouldn't over charge it. There are Lithium based batteries known to overheat from a failure in its chemical stability. It is, however, not common. I would remove it just because I wouldn't be using it. But truth is it doesn't matter.

Ntwlf
05-01-2015, 01:26 AM
Hi again GoAsusGo,
I have just replied to your air filter question. https://rog.asus.com/forum/showthread.php?60871-should-i-could-i-put-a-filter-on-the-air-vents

As you have indicated, "computers from the 1990's still running", I see no problems running 24/7. Just keep the air vents clean so the temps stay low. And it may be a good idea to reboot the computer (laptop in this case) on a biweekly interval at the least, to allow windows to (clean up after itself :eek:) run it's subroutines, maintenance, optimizations, etc. during the boot process. This may or may not apply to current OS's, but it definitely benefited older windows OS's, especially clearing ram.

I definitely agree with navis995, and Maxter. As far as the battery, it's a built in UPS. Nuf said.

I'll add the below, to my other reply, as indicated above, maybe someone else will benefit in reading it.

A possibility for filtering the air coming into the laptop, providing the air enters (intakes) from underneath, and I'm presuming the laptop doesn't get moved (ie...setting it on your lap) as you will see in the construction I suggest. And you could make this one cheaply.

Get a wooden Picture Frame with the same to a little smaller dimension as the laptop, similar to this http://www.amazon.com/DAX-Document-Inches-Rosewood-DAXN3246N1T/dp/B001CDW5SO/ref=sr_1_56?s=furniture&ie=UTF8&qid=1430440743&sr=1-56. Also get the "blue" Home HVAC Fiberglass Air Filter, similar to this http://www.amazon.com/Fiberglass-Furnace-Filter-20X25X1-FILTER/dp/B000LNJT9E/ref=sr_1_8?s=home-garden&ie=UTF8&qid=1430441000&sr=1-8&keywords=hvac+air+filter, as it's the least restrictive I know of.

Remove the hardboard back & glass so that your left with the bare frame. Now place the hardboard back onto the air filter and cut it to the same size and then lay the air filter aside for now. This next part can be a little tricky to explain. Measure in from each edge of the hardboard back by about an 1/2 an inch and draw your lines with a pencil. And then with a box knife, (be careful please), cut along the lines you have drawn and remove the inner hardboard. What you should have left now, is what looks like (sort of) another picture frame. Now lay the air filter you had cut out, into the wooden picture frame (where the glass was) and then lay the hardboard frame (you also have just cut out) on top of that. Now it needs fastened together. I suggest a staple gun http://www.amazon.com/Arrow-T50-Heavy-Duty-Staple/dp/B00002ND61/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1430441893&sr=8-1&keywords=arrow+staple+gun for this task, but you can use small tacks and a hammer as well.
Are you all beginning to see where this is going.:)

The finishing necessity is elevating the "Picture Frame Air filter" from the surface it rests upon, so that air freely enters from underneath. There's many solutions for this, so here is one. A strip of wood trim to fasten only to "2" opposite sides of the frame, and the wood strip wide enough to extend below the frame raising it up at least an inch from the surface it rests upon, so that air will enter from the other 2 sides and pass up through the filter and then into the laptop vents, in which you place on top of this whole contraption.:cool:

This should work quite well because of the large surface area of the filter opposed to the laptop air intake cooling vents

dne0gen
05-01-2015, 01:45 PM
Your laptop could last 10 years, but it could also last 10 days. It doesn't matter that much if it is always on or always off.
With technology there is always luck. If you are lucky it will last long and if you are not, well..
It doesn't matter that much if you keep it always on or off, but, as others have mentioned, if it is being cooled properly.
RoG laptops have an awesome cooling system, best one I have seen so far, so the laptop itself will do the best it can, which is pretty good, to keep it cool. Your part is to only keep it dust free and to not put it on a place where the air can't enter or exit the vents.
A common misconception about batteries is that they need to be charged and discharged very often, which is a thing of the past.
Your battery will slowly start to work less and less as time goes by and there is pretty much nothing you can do about it.
Other than that keep it clean and you can keep it working for however long you like. If a part of the laptop fails you can be sure that it has not been caused by you keeping it working all the time.
You don't really need any kind of

Nonpossible
05-02-2015, 07:39 PM
I wouldn't put any mesh or filter in front of your vents. That could restrict airflow and just cause overheating. Sorry about the misdirection with closing the lid. I hadn't though about the heat dissipation through the keyboard.

hmscott
05-02-2015, 08:10 PM
I wouldn't put any mesh or filter in front of your vents. That could restrict airflow and just cause overheating. Sorry about the misdirection with closing the lid. I hadn't though about the heat dissipation through the keyboard.

Nonpossible, the G750 keyboard is sealed, there is no airflow through it. The G750 is pretty much closed to airflow except through the bottom vents.

You should be able to leave the screen lid down and not affect the cooling or CPU/GPU temperature.

Filtering the intake air with a mesh can be done without causing air flow problems - as long as you keep the outside of the mesh clear from obstruction - wipe the dust off.

Use hwinfo64 to monitor the CPU/GPU temps while the keyboard is covered with the lid down, and when the lid is up, see if it makes a difference. Same for the mesh.

GoAsusGo!
05-03-2015, 04:37 PM
Nonpossible, the G750 keyboard is sealed, there is no airflow through it. The G750 is pretty much closed to airflow except through the bottom vents.

You should be able to leave the screen lid down and not affect the cooling or CPU/GPU temperature.

Filtering the intake air with a mesh can be done without causing air flow problems - as long as you keep the outside of the mesh clear from obstruction - wipe the dust off.

Use hwinfo64 to monitor the CPU/GPU temps while the keyboard is covered with the lid down, and when the lid is up, see if it makes a difference. Same for the mesh.


thanks for the info :-)

Amenophis
07-23-2017, 07:42 AM
My friends laptop caught fire after only 7 years of use. He refused to clean the exhaust pipes on it and never vacuumed the dust from the top of the unit. He kept it in the hottest place in the house where the humidity was very extensive. Suddenly, there was a burst of smoke that rolled out from the back and he poured a jug of water into it to stop the blaze. He says he'll never by another ASUS but will buy the infamous Toshiba. I'm sure if he treats his new laptop the way he did his ASUS, he'll have to have the fire department on speeddial. Let's hear it people! Let's have a round of applause for Jake for not taking care of his laptops. A silent applause will do now , won't it? Hmmmmmmm?

Darnassus
07-23-2017, 07:51 AM
My friends laptop caught fire after only 7 years of use. He refused to clean the exhaust pipes on it and never vacuumed the dust from the top of the unit. He kept it in the hottest place in the house where the humidity was very extensive. Suddenly, there was a burst of smoke that rolled out from the back and he poured a jug of water into it to stop the blaze. He says he'll never by another ASUS but will buy the infamous Toshiba. I'm sure if he treats his new laptop the way he did his ASUS, he'll have to have the fire department on speeddial. Let's hear it people! Let's have a round of applause for Jake for not taking care of his laptops. A silent applause will do now , won't it? Hmmmmmmm?

... Blue Lady hit you now. ;x

Korth
07-23-2017, 10:31 AM
Yes, fan bearings/motors do seize after years of use.
"Cheap" sleeve-bearing types are usually rated around 20,000 to 30,000 hours (27 to 41 months). They get louder and louder when they're dying and failure tends to be gradual, you'll probably get tired of hearing their angry noise long before they die.
"Better" ball-bearing types are usually rated around 50,000 hours (68 months). They develop annoying high-pitched rattling, ticking, or whining oscillations a little while before they die, again you'll tire of their noise before it happens.
"Superior" bearing types are usually rated much higher. Noctua's IndustrialPPC SSO2 bearings are rated >150,000 hours (over 17 years)! Never had one of these die on me before, lol, I don't know if there's any symptoms of failure.

A problem is that there's no standard for specifying fan longevity. Different fan manufacturers have different engineering (and marketing) methods. Unless specified, you don't know what parameters they use in their calculated MTBF/MTTF specs - fan duty-cycles, volts, rpms, measures for 50% or 75% or max 100% or what?

A bigger problem is that ASUS provides no specs for your G750 fans. The only way to know what their specs are is to examine their components and lookup their part numbers. At the very least, they should be marked with their Voltage (usually 12V or 5V) and their Amps or Watts, you can measure their frame dimensions, you can determine their motor type by the number of wires they feed into a mobo fan header - so replacement fans are always available, even if they aren't made by ASUS, even if you have to order generic Alibaba stuff.

If you have a mechanical HDD system drive then it might fail before the fans do. Especially if it stays busy all the time, or the machine gets moved around and bumped a lot.

If you have an SSD system drive then it also has a limited working lifespan, it should take years to fail completely but it suffers from gradually diminishing capacity and performance every time anything gets written to it, so you may find that while it still works it's also become a piece of junk after a few years.

The battery chemistry will last 2 or maybe 3 three years before it starts losing capacity and getting hot. It might keep working for many years. But most laptop batteries won't hold any charge within at most 5 years (depending on how they've been used or abused), they just become AC-powered laptop heaters.

The motherboard (or more likely, some electrolytic cap or inductor on it) will eventually fail, but good motherboards still work after a couple decades. CPU can fail. Thermal pastes tend to dry/burn and fail (and force the machine into thermal shutdown until repasted) after some years.

Heat accelerates electrical failures. Although an always-on machine is actually held in a steady thermal state (until something changes or fails) which is gentler on components than the thermal surges which flow through a machine whenever it's powered on. Overclocking anything will burn stuff out faster.
Dust accelerates mechanical failures. It even gets into HDDs (which are barometrically sealed, not hermetically sealed as many people believe). And it's a wonderfully efficient thermal insulator so it also increases component temps and accelerates thermal failures.

Lacking any specific component data, the warranty period of the laptop is a fair indicator of useful lifespan.

I wonder why you'd dedicate a somewhat costly G750 laptop to this always-on media server role when an inexpensive immobile desktop could do it just as well.

Amenophis
07-23-2017, 11:26 AM
... Blue Lady hit you now. ;x

Yeah, oooook ... not sure what you're driving at but apparently you do have something on your mind???

Korth
07-23-2017, 12:50 PM
Server's CPU lifespan is 10 years for being constant on. Will they last longer? likely... but they are made for 10 years. Since these laptops do not have server quality CPU, I assumed ~50% of server life. I got the info from a friend that works at intel.

Most servers can run much longer than 10 years, lol, or at least servers built over 10 years ago could.

Very few actually maintain this sort of epic uptime (http://imgur.com/nhVPwGm) with extremely high availability (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/High_availability). Mostly because of downtime caused by software faults, not caused by hardware faults.

I don't know where this "10 years" figure comes from. Xeon CPUs have 3 year Intel warranty. Xeon Phi cards have 1-2 year Intel warranty. Workstation (Xeon-chipset) mobos have (usually 2-3 year, sometimes 5 year) manufacturer warranty. GPU cards (workstation and consumer) have 3 year NVIDIA/AMD warranty. Server-grade PSUs have (at least 5 year, sometimes 7 year or 10 year) manufacturer warranty.

In fact, most enterprise hardware isn't even "owned" by the end-users, components and platforms are leased over a contract period (typically up to 3 years) from an OEM like ASUS, Supermicro, or Dell. The apparently high hardware purchase cost is actually divided up into a per-year hardware cost, it includes full service and support from the OEM, it ends up costing almost exactly the same in the accounting as purchasing the hardware asset up front then depreciating the value of the asset (as the hardware becomes "obsolete") over time. Hardware problems are fixed "for free". Hardware upgrades are frequent (every new lease). Depreciated hardware doesn't need to be stored (ongoing expense) or liquidated (below actual value). It's a multi-billion-dollar industry, they OEMs have exhaustively calculated every penny and every detail (even not-yet-invented computing technologies) with exacting precision, and they make their money by making this sort of leasing model the most "affordable" way for corporations to access enterprise machinery.

The stuff is built to last, sure, unexciting but proven reliability and redundancy and scalability. A typical rack holds a bunch of blade units which are each packed with multiple (modestly or massively multi-core) Xeon CPUs, multiple (modestly or massively GPGPU) workstation GPUs, and/or multiple (very large or very fast) storage devices, along with error-correction and mirroring and power backups built into every major block. They emphasize stability and reliability over security or performance or longevity (although these are all parameters linked to reliability), and could hardly care less about cosmetics because an industrial heatsink or generic green PCB works better or costs less than stylized consumer parts anyhow. A properly-configured stable server can last 10 years, even 20, maybe more - but hardly any of them are kept running that long or even kept out of the landfill that long.

The last few generations of high-end consumer mobos have been using server-grade components along with very robust VRM designs, socket/slot enhancements, DIMM placements, thermal management, etc. They might last just as long as enterprise gear, at least if they're run within rated spec (not overclocking anything). The "~50% of server life" assumption seems reasonable in the absence of real data. Then again, I've got an ancient computer (875P mobo (http://dlcdnet.asus.com/pub/ASUS/mb/sock478/P4C800E-DX/e1347b_p4c800-e_deluxe.pdf?_ga=2.53751976.1031614555.1500436191-914607102.1500436191), Pentium 4 CPU (http://ark.intel.com/products/27490/Pentium-4-Processor-Extreme-Edition-supporting-HT-Technology-3_40-GHz-2M-Cache-800-MHz-FSB), 4GB DDR (http://www.anandtech.com/show/1928/7), HD4670/1GB AGP (http://www.hisdigital.com/ca/product2-448.shtml), a mighty gaming beast back then) which has been running continuously (with many reboots) since 2008, and I had another ancient computer (780G mobo (https://www.asus.com/Motherboards/M3A78EM/), Athlon II X3 CPU (http://www.cpu-world.com/CPUs/K10/AMD-Athlon%20II%20X3%20440%20-%20ADX440WFK32GI%20(ADX440WFGIBOX).html), 8GB DDR2 (http://www.corsair.com/en-gb/vs4gbkit800d2), strange HD7870/2GB GPU (https://www.aria.co.uk/Products/Components/Graphics+Cards/AMD+Radeon/Radeon+HD+7870+Tahiti+LE/XFX+DD+Radeon+HD+7870+GHz+Edition+%28TAHITI+EDITIO N%29+2GB+GDDR5+Graphics+Card+%5BFX-787A-CNAC%5D+?productId=55140&page=17&rqcType=q)) which ran nonstop for over 4 years before a power outage then would never restart again (dead mobo, not worth fixing lol). Gaming mobo companies like ASUS are now building gaming mobos with extreme performance and excellent reliability, while enterprise companies like Supermicro are building gaming mobos with extreme reliability and excellent performance - the lines were never clearly defined before, but now they're just downright blurry.

Clintlgm
07-23-2017, 02:22 PM
I am shocked that it only lasted 7 years in those conditions!!!

There are 3 components of fire
Fuel Dust Flammable and explosive if saturate airborne
Heat Dust matting make a great heat retaining insulator
Oxygen the fans are bring it in all the time or with out fans the heat it self rising draws in fresh air carrying O2 to the heat and fuel.

JustinThyme
07-24-2017, 04:18 AM
Personally I dont understand leaving a portable machine on 24x7. Much cheaper alternatives that will last longer.

As for how long it will last?
There is no magic number. Could be a month could be ten years.
Just dont expect the battery to hold up.

Korth
07-24-2017, 05:45 AM
Personally I dont understand leaving a portable machine on 24x7. Much cheaper alternatives that will last longer.

As for how long it will last?
There is no magic number. Could be a month could be ten years.
Just dont expect the battery to hold up.
That's what I said!

Although you were far more concise, lol.

GoAsusGo!
09-22-2018, 04:07 AM
Thank you for your replies.

Judging from the number of views on this thread (over 7k) alot of people are interested in how long their laptop will last.

Since starting this thread in 2015 my g750jx has been on 24/7 and i have had no hardware problems with it.

I never move the laptop from its spot on my desk and i never use it for cpu/gpu intensive stuff like gaming/rendering.
and
I have only opened it up once to clean the dust inside.
and
Coincidentally, since the windows 10 creators update i have been unable to put it into sleep mode - it just shuts down instead.
anyways,
Now i feel like i want to put it to sleep during the evenings so if anyone has any ideas how to resolve that issue, would they kindly reply in my other thread https://rog.asus.com/forum/showthread.php?105099-g750jx-laptop-SHUTS-DOWN-when-i-select-Sleep

thanks again for your replies :-)

Darnassus
09-23-2018, 04:38 AM
Don't forget to do weekly shutdowns to keep all the zombie files out. ;d

navis995
01-01-2019, 01:36 PM
Don't forget to do weekly shutdowns to keep all the zombie files out. ;d

with enough ram not even that is required
cache away!

Korth
01-02-2019, 08:12 AM
with enough ram not even that is required
cache away!

Sigh.

The prevailing attitude used to be "small code runs faster", a byte is a byte and a nanosecond is a nanosecond, it all adds up and multiplies out, keep things lean and clean to get best stability and performance.
The prevailing attitude these days is just pack more bloat onto bloat, layer complex things into complex things, the hardware is capable enough to handle the load so just keep rushing forward with more instead of taking a step back when needed to get rid of clunky baggage.

Just a mini-rant, sorry. Lamenting that we've come to the point where the solutions to bad code are faster processors and bigger memories.

Arne Saknussemm
01-02-2019, 09:02 AM
How long is the warranty on the laptop? It will last that long plus one or two days ;)

GoAsusGo!
01-25-2019, 10:33 PM
i first started this thread April 2015. since then, my laptops been on 24/7.
Thats four straight years this laptops been on.
even the ssd c drive still works.

JustinThyme
01-26-2019, 05:01 AM
How long is the warranty on the laptop? It will last that long plus one or two days ;)

LMAO bbut about right.
You will know when its about to die



You will see this...

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