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View Full Version : Fourth Repaste! Gosh Blue Lady..



Darnassus
10-04-2015, 12:28 PM
And I am back ;U

Done another repaste today since it's been 7 months or so, my temperatures were hitting over 80 again for the past few weeks and I wasn't liking it, especially now that Summer's coming.

Fell back down a whopping 20*C,

CPU Idle was 64-67 --- Now 46

GPU Idle was 50-55 --- Now 41


Probably would go lower since I'm running Chrome tabs and Skype in the background.

I think MX-4 is crap.. it seems to be drying out after 6months, I've found various other posts about it. Lasting 8 years? Bull. ':f

Might change to Gelid..

Jali24
10-05-2015, 09:26 AM
Hey Darnassus! Just curious, what you use on the gpu memory chips? Just mx4 or something like k5 pro?

I'm new to this forums because I resently bought a used g750jw, configured and repasted it with mx4(didnt repaste the gpu memory chips)
and sold it. Bought used G750JH after :D (Got also asus backpack and roccat kone with JH)

This forum has given me lots of information about oc'ing G750.
My temps are CPU 60-70 and GPU 70-75 while playing shadow of mordor. Still having old paste. I have ordered GC-extreme and k5 pro for chips.
Idle temps are 38-40 for cpu and 40 for gpu, while using best performance setting.

When I cleaned the JH with air, oh my so much dust.. And the both plastic screwholders in the plate behind screen were broken for both JW and JH, just sad when people can't handle their computer with care.

Cheers from Finland! :cool:

Darnassus
10-05-2015, 10:15 AM
I used K5 yes and MX-4 on the dies. I want to change to Gelid like you though..

Yes lots of dust gets inside. :c

I am jealous of your JH I have the JX myself, hopefully I'll be able to get myself a G752 sometime in the future. Or a G751 on Boxing Day this year for cheap.

I got the JX for 40% off. ;3

Jali24
10-05-2015, 12:34 PM
I used K5 yes and MX-4 on the dies. I want to change to Gelid like you though..

Yes lots of dust gets inside. :c

I am jealous of your JH I have the JX myself, hopefully I'll be able to get myself a G752 sometime in the future. Or a G751 on Boxing Day this year for cheap.

I got the JX for 40% off. ;3

I first was thinking to replace my gpu to 770m from g750 for 300euros but then I decided to sell JW and use that 300euros to buy JH with 780m :D even better.

Now I noticed that gpu idle temperature is 49 while it's on my lap and not plugged. The fan isnt spinning also. I think Asus programmed it so It doesn't use fan when not plugged.

I think I'm going to repaste when I get some heat issues while playing.
I tried to OC my gpu but the temperature went too high IMO closer to 80'C While having only +60Mhz on core and +500Mhz on mememory.
Just waiting for my pastes to come so I can start to think about repasting.

EDIT: Gpu fan kicked in and temperature dropped to 42

Darnassus
07-20-2017, 05:44 PM
Done another repaste.. (this is for my own logging information)

Clintlgm
07-20-2017, 08:06 PM
I have never repasted a notebook, but I do build my own desktops, I switched to IC Diamond a few years back and it has held up very well, dropping my temps into the 20's at Idle with 25.5 Ambient. I also see HID and Xtopic are both still pasting with IC Diamond, HID is also doing a liquid Metal one too I don't remember offhand which one.

Korth
07-21-2017, 03:17 AM
I'm a little surprised that Arctic MX-4 lasted only around 6-7 months. I've never used it, but I've seen applications of Arctic Silver 5 last 2-3 years in many systems, almost 5 years in one system - and AS5 never advertised MX4's much-vaunted "8 year" lifespan.

But I'm not surprised that K5-PRO failed. It's designed to work as a "gummy", "pasty", "goopy" TIM. Too much heat too long too often will vitrify it - "cook" it dry and change its chemical composition (along with its thermal properties).

Many people report good results repasting their gaming laptops with Diamond IC. I have coworkers who've repasted their laptops with a Shin Etsu X23 formula. Gelid is good stuff but I suspect a poor choice for repasting laptop hardware - laptops are technologically dense and full of hot parts, low-viscosity TIMs (like Gelid) are directly exposed to a lot of heat which will tend to burn them off - I'd be a little surprised if a full Gelid repaste lasts even as long as the MX4 did.

Application method and part coverage are often overlooked but just as important as the particular properties of the TIM itself. What are you repasting - CPU, VRMs, PCH, GPU, etc?
And there is no "perfect" TIM which is "perfect" for every application - if there were, there wouldn't be much variety of TIMs on the market. No single TIM is likely to be ideally suited for every part in a computer, best general thermal efficiency likely requires several different TIMs across specific parts.


Gelid GC Extreme is low-viscosity (it's thin and runny), best used when mating surfaces are interlocking or have very tight contact tolerances. It cooks/dries out faster and sometimes need reapplication (on very hot parts) every few months. It has excellent performance and seems to have the best (or "least worst") performance in subzero overclocking.

Prolimatech PK-2 is mid-viscosity (sort of average), best overall TIM for most parts in my opinion. It adheres really well and can last many months or a few years before dryout. It also has excellent performance. PK-3 is supposedly even better (never tried it because my big jar of PK-2 is still half-full, lol).

Arctic Silver 5 is mid-/high-viscosity (kinda thick and pasty), it's a better choice on large-gap, planar, or slightly convex/concave surfaces (like LGA2011-3 processors) because it stays where you put it and maintains great performance pretty much forever (the stuff takes years to cook off). It's also really cheap. I sometimes even use it as a thermally-conductive glue, lol.

IC Diamond contains abrasive microparticles which promote metal corrosion and - after repeated applications - can actually scratch off part markings. Many people swear by it, I've never used it.

Phobya He-Grease and Tuniq TX-4 are about as good (some say better) than PK-3 or AS5, but again I've never tried them.

The reality is that any premium TIM will outperform any cheap TIM and the actual measurable differences are nearly insignificant among top performers - each brand has passionate diehards and vehement haters, I suspect conflicting benchmark results usually have more to do with variances in application method or quirky heat sources than with substantially differing TIM characteristics - my personal experience is that the main difference between TIMs is their viscosity/adhesion parameters, no single TIM can be absolutely perfect for every possible application because each is better suited for a different kind of interface geometry.

You can be assured that any properly-applied premium TIM product will outperform that cheap pink goop Asus put into your machine.

I also prefer Arctic Silver 5 for most CPU installations. Maybe not the very best of the best of the best but it's always counted among the top performers and it's cheap and common and - unlike most other TIMs - an application of AS5 seems to last at least a few years before it cooks off.

I also use Prolimatek PK-1 and PK-2 (I still have big jars full of the stuff) and Gelid GC Extreme (because it's so excellent for some things) and a Shin Etsu X23 (which we use for so many things at work). I sometimes even mix my TIMs together to "engineer" something more ideal for a particular application. I always mix my TIM up evenly (by vigorously shaking the tube, if nothing else) and heat it up a bit (stick the tube into warm water) before application. I scrape it across CPU parts with a razor blade, similar to the credit card method described above. Too little is far better than too much, if you have to wipe off any TIM that's leaked out of the edges then you'll find there's always "thick" spots and "thin" spots and bubbles/gaps hidden between the parts which can run too hot.

Phobya HeGrease is apparently quite good, too. And IC Diamond, although it contains abrasive microparticles which can apparently (at least over time and over repeated applications) actually scratch up the polished surfaces (and part markings) on processors.

Any premium branded TIM is going to outperform any cheap/generic TIM. And the differences between 99.5% or 99.55% or even 99.75% thermal efficiency aren't worth obsessing over unless you're going for some sort of world record overclock ... especially since there's so much controversy, bias, misinformation, disinformation, exaggeration, elaboration, and hype about which of the very best top performing brands is indeed the very best top performing brand. And one thing all those comprehensive lab benchmarks don't measure or compare is TIM longevity - I know that AS5 can last years and Gelid or X23 can last months, but I don't know how most TIMs compare in the long run - an important parameter for those of us who don't plan to remount CPUs with great frequency.

TIM coverage is far more critical than TIM conductivity. Low viscosity (thin and runny) TIMs are better used when the gap between mating part surfaces is extremely tight or interlocking part geometries makes TIM application inaccessible/difficult. High viscosity (thick and pasty) TIMs are better used when the gap between mating part surfaces needs a little bit of "filler" to maintain efficient thermal contact. Thermal pads and glues should only be used when a bulk material is needed to conduct heat across larger (air-filled) gaps and/or to provide some mechanical adhesion (structural stability) between parts. In fact, thermal pads are generally used only in situations where solid-state TIMs (like silica, mica, elastomer, HOPG, etc) cannot be used instead.

I haven't installed any Ryzen parts yet so I admit I'm unfamiliar with their specific surface features.

Other CPU parts often have slightly convex or concave surfaces. Designed to be paired with coolers which have perfectly matched slightly concave or convex surfaces - to provide greater cross-sectional area for heat transfer between the two surfaces. Although the majority of coolers are not exclusively designed to perfectly fit exactly one processor, they often have "perfectly flat" (and slightly-oversized) baseplates which are designed to accommodate a wider range of sockets and fittings and processor types. If the processor and the cooler don't "match" perfectly then a mid-viscosity TIM (like AS5) is an excellent choice, although some experimentation with different (or mixed) TIMs might be required to find an optimum heat transfer.

Bahz
07-21-2017, 04:04 AM
Try Thermal Grizzly Kryonaut, I repasted one of my friend's notebook with this a few years ago and temps have stayed the same even after all this time, it's expected to last many more years.

Darnassus
07-21-2017, 04:04 AM
IC scares me since I'm messy.

Eleiyas
07-21-2017, 02:22 PM
I've never repasted anything... and I've had my PC for almost 8 years.

Stock paste for ever! x)

Darnassus
07-21-2017, 03:48 PM
Mmmh.. how's your sinks? ;x Fluffy? ;d

Eleiyas
07-21-2017, 07:18 PM
nah, I regularly clean out dust and stuff, just never repaste.

I did upgrade my MB and CPU lately, but again, stock coolant paste on the cooler :3

Korth
07-21-2017, 08:10 PM
I only repaste when temps start getting nasty. The generic pink goop ASUS uses on everything might not be the best of the best stuff but it's what the ASUS engineers selected and know best and, of course, mucking around with it instantly voids ASUS warranty.

Every component in the machine was carefully and comprehensively evaluated by these engineers (since I assume they're competent). Yes, manufacturing cost, profit, revenue, and the economies of value engineering (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Value_engineering) are all important parameters (or limits) which impose tradeoffs they must weigh carefully, not always producing results every end-user might consider ideal. Logistics are also important because "ideal" components are not always reasonably or reliably available from suppliers, the consumer can't buy a product which the manufacturer can't source enough parts/materials/resources to actually produce and sell. And let's face it, a gaming laptop just doesn't command the same "unlimited" priorities as something like a NASA satellite or a nuclear reactor, a "perfect" gaming laptop which requires Unobtainium is a "perfect" gaming laptop which is Unobtainable.

But product performance, stability, reliability, and longevity are also very important parameters. I expect the ASUS-provided TIM will allow the machine to run as advertised and provide a useful service life. There's no reason to fix what already works.

I do know people (offline and online) who automatically and eagerly rip open and repaste their new laptops with their preferred TIM. And sometimes they proudly brag about "impressively" improved temps or performances. I don't personally think the numbers are all that impressive, at least not in the context of representing meaningful improvements on real-world computing and gaming. And I don't personally think it's worth the time and effort to set yourself up for a continued cycle (of more time and effort) sunk into repeatedly repasting something that was originally built to keep working for years. But we all have our own opinions, mine aren't any more or less valid than yours.

I've seen audiophiles automatically and eagerly replace factory op amps with "better" parts of their own choosing. I've seen mechanics automatically and eagerly replace factory engine parts with "upgraded" parts of their own choosing. I've seen tinkerers and hackers and modders of all types automatically and eagerly replace this part for that part in all sorts of devices because of a "better" specification or higher confidence in a brand.
This is all cool - I do this a lot of this myself, it's even part of my job, lol - and I firmly support our fundamental Freedom to Tinker. But it's best done only when it accomplishes something useful. And it's best done when evaluating the general capabilities of a system or a machine in entirety, not the specific capabilities of a "better" component in isolation.

Darnassus
07-21-2017, 10:02 PM
nah, I regularly clean out dust and stuff, just never repaste.

I did upgrade my MB and CPU lately, but again, stock coolant paste on the cooler :3

Hoedup... You're a Desktop.. you can't be here! ;U!

Bahz
07-26-2017, 08:55 AM
IC scares me since I'm messy.

Use a flathead spreader for ICs, it's so easy.

Darnassus
07-26-2017, 09:18 AM
Use a flathead spreader for ICs, it's so easy.

I do use spreaders, but I'm still scared of doing it. Perhaps I should start using a soft sticky tape and frame the cpu, paint, then remove.

I don't know, I'm used to not being risky with CPU's that have transistors surrounding the die. I see Skylake's different, so I'll probably use it then.

Darnassus
07-26-2017, 09:21 AM
Also, what is this?

Why isn't that chip pasted? :f

(G752VS)

66243
http://i.imgur.com/yneJVl2.jpg

Clintlgm
07-26-2017, 02:06 PM
IC is non conductive so shouldn't be any issues with near by parts? and I always use the dollop in the center of CPU and compress evenly, IC highly discourages spreading there product any other way, do to the creation of air pockets between the cpu and heatsink. There product is very thick I usually have to soak the syringe in hot water for a while to help it to flow out of the tube!!

Bahz
07-28-2017, 02:46 AM
IC is non conductive so shouldn't be any issues with near by parts? and I always use the dollop in the center of CPU and compress evenly, IC highly discourages spreading there product any other way, do to the creation of air pockets between the cpu and heatsink. There product is very thick I usually have to soak the syringe in hot water for a while to help it to flow out of the tube!!

ICs on memory or graphics card are non-conductive but certain ICs have metal cover to cool help cool down so I think that's what is being referred to here.

Korth
07-28-2017, 03:24 AM
Also, what is this?

Why isn't that chip pasted? :f
http://i.imgur.com/yneJVl2.jpg

Unpasted VRM chip. That is a very good question.

Assuming the existing paste was applied by ASUS ... in my experience they always use that cheap pink goop, not that white stuff. Is the existing (lack of) TIM from one of your previous repaste jobs? Curious to me that the chip looks spotless while the mating surface (on the copper heatsink side) looks like it's been scrubbed.

Darnassus
07-28-2017, 09:48 AM
Unpasted VRM chip. That is a very good question.

Assuming the existing paste was applied by ASUS ... in my experience they always use that cheap pink goop, not that white stuff. Is the existing (lack of) TIM from one of your previous repaste jobs? Curious to me that the chip looks spotless while the mating surface (on the copper heatsink side) looks like it's been scrubbed.

No it's not unpasted, it's completely missed from the cooling solution. The heatsink doesn't even touch it, it's just a void of air between it and the pipe.

I don't believe it's a VRM though, looks like an Inductor of some sort. The VRM's are the small ones behind it aren't they? ;x

Eleiyas
07-28-2017, 11:52 AM
Hoedup... You're a Desktop.. you can't be here! ;U!

I go where I please - mwahahaha!