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Chuck22
12-03-2015, 06:25 PM
upgraded to win 10.....stupid. Too many problems, tried rebooting 10 still had problems. try to recover 7 and now it does not work. tried F9 recovery nothing. tried my recovery image from disks won't work. downloaded and iso of win 7 and it won't recognize it. Help

noobOC
12-03-2015, 08:57 PM
Do you have your bios set to boot from dvd drive? After upgrading to Win10 you should have done a clean install from Win10 recovery disk that you created

Chuck22
12-04-2015, 02:34 PM
Do you have your bios set to boot from dvd drive? After upgrading to Win10 you should have done a clean install from Win10 recovery disk that you created

Way passed that. I attempted to do a recovery of win 7 using my original recovery disks. So win 10 does not exist anymore. That is probably where i screwed up. Nothing seems to be working. I have exhuasted ever option thru using F9. Everything freezes after the chkdsk is comlete, no errors found.

Tried to load a full win 7 download and it won't get pass the Setup is Starting screen.

Asus says they can send me a recovery disk for $50.00. But I can buy a full program at the store for that much. And there is no guarantee the recovery disk will work

Can I use a wipe drive program and load win 7 from scratch, or do you have a better suggestion.

Korth
12-04-2015, 03:04 PM
If you originally have Win7 and "upgrade" to Win10 through the GWX invitation then Microsoft generously gives you a 30 day trial. But if you don't retrograde back to Win7 before the 30 days expire your Win7 Genuine Product Key forever becomes a Win10 Genuine Product Key. Meaning that in practice you no longer own a copy of Win7, you now own a copy of Win10, and you can only use Win7 again by buying yourself another copy.

Your Windows Genuine Product Key is encoded in your UEFI firmware (http://www.howtogeek.com/206329/how-to-find-your-lost-windows-or-office-product-keys/). And on Microsoft's Windows Product Activation database. And it's locked to Win10.

So now you can only run Win7 on that motherboard if you can install a copy with a different Genuine Product Key that hasn't been already married to another UEFI platform. A "Non-Genuine" Win7 copy will be a pain to install right from the start because it will keep "failing" system hardware startup, and, if you do somehow manage to get it running (from a cloned image, etc), it will stubbornly refuse to Activate and begin to annoyingly block out a lot of basic WinOS functionality.

Chances are any Asus recovery discs will have the original (Win7) OS that shipped with your platform or the most recent (Win10) OS ... and, as you suggest, they're likely OEM-branded garbage filled with even more junkware and Product Key problems than actual Microsoft OEM copies.
If you want to retrograde to Win7 (or Win8.x) at this point, your best option is to buy yourself an actual bona-fide Microsoft OEM Genuine Windows install disc. You might be able to explain your problem to Microsoft Support and convince them to issue you a new Windows Product Key or reactivate your existing one or whatever - many dissatisfied GWX victims have done this already - but be prepared to play the long waiting game through email, chat, and phone.

(And just for future reference - never install the "Get Windows 10" Invitation, aka gwx.exe, aka Windows Update KB3035583 (https://support.microsoft.com/en-us/kb/3035583).)

Chuck22
12-04-2015, 05:41 PM
If you originally have Win7 and "upgrade" to Win10 through the GWX invitation then Microsoft generously gives you a 30 day trial. But if you don't retrograde back to Win7 before the 30 days expire your Win7 Genuine Product Key forever becomes a Win10 Genuine Product Key. Meaning that in practice you no longer own a copy of Win7, you now own a copy of Win10, and you can only use Win7 again by buying yourself another copy.

Your Windows Genuine Product Key is encoded in your UEFI firmware (http://www.howtogeek.com/206329/how-to-find-your-lost-windows-or-office-product-keys/). And on Microsoft's Windows Product Activation database. And it's locked to Win10.

So now you can only run Win7 on that motherboard if you can install a copy with a different Genuine Product Key that hasn't been already married to another UEFI platform. A "Non-Genuine" Win7 copy will be a pain to install right from the start because it will keep "failing" system hardware startup, and, if you do somehow manage to get it running (from a cloned image, etc), it will stubbornly refuse to Activate and begin to annoyingly block out a lot of basic WinOS functionality.

Chances are any Asus recovery discs will have the original (Win7) OS that shipped with your platform or the most recent (Win10) OS ... and, as you suggest, they're likely OEM-branded garbage filled with even more junkware and Product Key problems than actual Microsoft OEM copies.
If you want to retrograde to Win7 (or Win8.x) at this point, your best option is to buy yourself an actual bona-fide Microsoft OEM Genuine Windows install disc. You might be able to explain your problem to Microsoft Support and convince them to issue you a new Windows Product Key or reactivate your existing one or whatever - many dissatisfied GWX victims have done this already - but be prepared to play the long waiting game through email, chat, and phone.

(And just for future reference - never install the "Get Windows 10" Invitation, aka gwx.exe, aka Windows Update KB3035583 (https://support.microsoft.com/en-us/kb/3035583).)



Thanks. So I guess my best bet is to spend the money for an OEM version of win 7 home premium 64-bit and load that.
do i need to wipe the drive first using active killdisk or something like that and then load. Or just go for it.

Korth
12-04-2015, 06:13 PM
You don't strictly need to wipe the drive. (Nor do you need a special killdisk program since a little fumbling around with partitions in Disk Management or ancient FDISK will accomplish much the same thing.)

But erasing the drive will ensure a clean setup, no leftover garbage hanging around to confuse simple-minded little Windows, no possibility of any clever traps left over by Microsoft Windows demolition experts.

If you absolutely do not need to recover any data from the drive then do it right and live large and have some fun and run your killdisk.

Yes, ideally you want an OEM Win7x64 install disc with its own Windows 7 Product Key printed onto a cute little hologram.
Or a bootable Windows 7 disc image (https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/software-download/windows7) (on a USB drive) plus a downloaded Windows 7 Product Key (http://windows.microsoft.com/en-ca/windows/get-windows-product-key#get-windows-product-key=windows-7). A popular option because it costs less, but if/when it breaks you're screwed all over again.

Again, you might be able to convince somebody at Microsoft Support that you need your Win7 fixed. Claiming that Win10 is awesome and works perfectly but won't run that *one* special expensive custom app/tool you use for work (and don't know anything about or just can't talk about) is often convincing enough, they just need to tick one of their neat little bureaucratic checkboxes.

noobOC
12-04-2015, 08:06 PM
I would personally just weed out your win10 issues. Most problems I read about are caused from people upgrading, not making an ISO image and clean installing.
If you just dont like 10 because of what it is that's a different story.

Chuck22
12-05-2015, 02:48 PM
You don't strictly need to wipe the drive. (Nor do you need a special killdisk program since a little fumbling around with partitions in Disk Management or ancient FDISK will accomplish much the same thing.)

But erasing the drive will ensure a clean setup, no leftover garbage hanging around to confuse simple-minded little Windows, no possibility of any clever traps left over by Microsoft Windows demolition experts.

If you absolutely do not need to recover any data from the drive then do it right and live large and have some fun and run your killdisk.

Yes, ideally you want an OEM Win7x64 install disc with its own Windows 7 Product Key printed onto a cute little hologram.
Or a bootable Windows 7 disc image (https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/software-download/windows7) (on a USB drive) plus a downloaded Windows 7 Product Key (http://windows.microsoft.com/en-ca/windows/get-windows-product-key#get-windows-product-key=windows-7). A popular option because it costs less, but if/when it breaks you're screwed all over again.

Again, you might be able to convince somebody at Microsoft Support that you need your Win7 fixed. Claiming that Win10 is awesome and works perfectly but won't run that *one* special expensive custom app/tool you use for work (and don't know anything about or just can't talk about) is often convincing enough, they just need to tick one of their neat little bureaucratic checkboxes.


Final outcome of my disaster......

The laptop would always freeze at the completion of chkdisk. I let it sit at that point numerous times for some 2 hours or more and finally gave up and tried something else. Sometimes it would even try rebooting itself only to stop at the same point. Lucky me, I went to bed last night sitting at the same point frozen, or so I thought. Woke up this morning to a brand new computer. Who would have know that it would have to sit like that for 8 hours. It finally worked itself out. Creating new recovery disks now. All is looking good.

Thanks for the help.

NOW is there a list somewhere of all the ASUS junk that can be deleted.