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isaacc
02-05-2017, 09:26 AM
Of the Z270 mobo that have SupremeFX, some are specified as using the S1220A CODEC and others the S1220. What's the difference between the two in terms of features? I've been all over the Internet and can't find any information about it. I wish ASUS had a dedicated SupremeFX page that lays out all the features and specifications of the various SupremeFX packages and CODECs. Thanks.

Raja@ASUS
02-05-2017, 10:28 AM
The 1220A lacks i2S output. The S1220 has i2S, and the ROG boards that feature this use the ESS Sabre DAC and headphone buffer to drive front panel audio output.

isaacc
02-06-2017, 10:10 AM
Could that be a typo for the ROG Maximus IX Apex. It is described as both using the S1220A codec as well as having the Sabre DAC (ES9023P). Should it state S1220 codec instead? Otherwise, I'm confused. Thanks.

Raja@ASUS
02-06-2017, 10:58 AM
That's a mistake on the page that will be corrected. It doesn't have the ESS DAC. It uses the S1220A, not the S1220.

MeTaL_SnAkE
02-06-2017, 10:30 PM
The 1220A lacks i2S output. The S1220 has i2S, and the ROG boards that feature this use the ESS Sabre DAC and headphone buffer to drive front panel audio output.

My english is a little bad sometimes so i'm not sure if I understand correctly.. That means that the front audio panel won't use some of the benefits like the 'headphone buffer' in the front panel for the Apex?

ikrananka
02-20-2017, 03:48 PM
The 1220A lacks i2S output. The S1220 has i2S, and the ROG boards that feature this use the ESS Sabre DAC and headphone buffer to drive front panel audio output.

I had exactly the same question, and also agree with the OP that Asus really need a webpage that provides far more details of the various flavours of SupremeFX to help buyers in their decision making process.

Now, you state that the S1220 has i2S - does this improve the audio quality through speakers connected to the back panel connnectors?

Does the ESS Sabre DAC and the headphone buffer ONLY benefit the front panel connectors?

Raja@ASUS
02-21-2017, 01:51 AM
I had exactly the same question, and also agree with the OP that Asus really need a webpage that provides far more details of the various flavours of SupremeFX to help buyers in their decision making process.

Now, you state that the S1220 has i2S - does this improve the audio quality through speakers connected to the back panel connnectors?

i2S is a method of transferring digital data to a DAC. It has nothing to do with the analog domain as your post implies. To be more accurate, the ESS DAC is not connected to the rear panel outputs, so it does not supply the rear analog outputs.



Does the ESS Sabre DAC and the headphone buffer ONLY benefit the front panel connectors?

Yes.

ikrananka
02-21-2017, 01:38 PM
i2S is a method of transferring digital data to a DAC. It has nothing to do with the analog domain as your post implies. To be more accurate, the ESS DAC is not connected to the rear panel outputs, so it does not supply the rear analog outputs.



Yes.

Thanks for the clarification. So, does that mean there is no difference in analog audio quality output to speakers (rear panel) between the S1220A and S1220?

Raja@ASUS
02-21-2017, 02:37 PM
From a codec perspective, it depends what type of output stage is utilized internally (and how much difference that may make). If there are any differences in the amount of decoupling used on some boards, component layout, trace routing, or the PCB layer count, then that can make a minor difference in some situations (but we're getting into audiophile territory).

Jaqey
07-01-2017, 09:48 PM
the ESS DAC is not connected to the rear panel outputs, so it does not supply the rear analog outputs.

I found contradicting information @ https://unlocked.newegg.com/article/hands-asus-z270-motherboards

"A new change for ASUS is the inclusion of the DAC and amp on the back of the motherboard. Previously, the fancy audio equipment only worked on the front audio header. So if you plugged your high ohm audiophile headphones into the back, you’d have a bad time.Now, the killer ESS Sabre DAC (and amp) powers both the front and back jacks."

So is the news article correct?

Also, the Strix Z270 series have dual op-amps for headphones, but the more premium ROG Maximus IX series lack this.
Is this because only ROG has the switching mosfets and therefore can use the same op-amp for both rear & front outputs while Strix needs a dedicated op-amp for both front & rear? Otherwise it would seem the Strix series has more powerful headphone output than ROG.

Thank you.

Raja@ASUS
07-04-2017, 10:39 AM
I found contradicting information @ https://unlocked.newegg.com/article/hands-asus-z270-motherboards

"A new change for ASUS is the inclusion of the DAC and amp on the back of the motherboard. Previously, the fancy audio equipment only worked on the front audio header. So if you plugged your high ohm audiophile headphones into the back, you’d have a bad time.Now, the killer ESS Sabre DAC (and amp) powers both the front and back jacks."

So is the news article correct?




That article is incorrect. Boards that feature the ESS DAC do not reroute the DAC's audio outputs to the rear I/O. The only thing that's dynamic here is the impedance sensing, and I think that's what confused them.



Also, the Strix Z270 series have dual op-amps for headphones, but the more premium ROG Maximus IX series lack this.
Is this because only ROG has the switching mosfets and therefore can use the same op-amp for both rear & front outputs while Strix needs a dedicated op-amp for both front & rear? Otherwise it would seem the Strix series has more powerful headphone output than ROG.

Thank you.


The Strix boards use the codec's built-in headphone output, which then goes through a voltage gain stage (because it needs voltage gain) and then a buffer stage. In contrast, the Maximus boards bypass the codec's analog output's entirely, utilizing i2S to send the digital stream to the ESS DAC, which is then buffered by a RC4580. The ES9023 already outputs 2V, so it doesn't need the voltage gain stage, and it's analog output is arguably 'better' than the codec's native analog output.

Hope this clears things up...

-Raja

Jaqey
07-13-2017, 12:38 AM
The ES9023 already outputs 2V, so it doesn't need the voltage gain stage, and it's analog output is arguably 'better' than the codec's native analog output.

Hope this clears things up...

-Raja

Thank you for the detailed info!

However ROG front jack (ES9023) has 112 dB SNR while the rear jack (S1220) has 120dB & gold connectors.

Is front jack still the better option to connect headphones?

Raja@ASUS
07-13-2017, 05:29 AM
Thank you for the detailed info!

However ROG front jack (ES9023) has 112 dB SNR while the rear jack (S1220) has 120dB & gold connectors.

Is front jack still the better option to connect headphones?


Gold isn't the best conductor, it just prevents oxidization. When comparing specs, there's also distortion, frequency response, and output impedance to consider. And, at these levels, things become subjective fast. In other words, don't get too hung up on a couple of minor points.

Jaqey
08-22-2017, 06:50 PM
Gold isn't the best conductor, it just prevents oxidization. When comparing specs, there's also distortion, frequency response, and output impedance to consider. And, at these levels, things become subjective fast. In other words, don't get too hung up on a couple of minor points.

Great info, thank you.

I'm using the front jack for Sennheiser HD600 (300ohm) headphones, and above volume 20/100 in Windows is already too loud.
In this case I guess I don't need a separate headphone amp like Objective2 as the Hero IX has good enough quality?

Thanks!

jjxakergm
08-22-2017, 08:08 PM
Why the codec S1220A on APEX at the launching of the operating system gives a high-frequency sound to the speakers as a result there is a strong bang?
If the sound on the speakers is very high, then you can be very frightened when the operating system is launched. Why the engineers of Asus can ignore such an obvious problem?
Connect the speakers to the back panel, set the sound on the speakers to maximum, turn on the computer. right after the win bootloader there will be a very strong low-frequency sound.
Why then the board with the codec S1220 not have problems?

ledude
12-02-2017, 05:15 PM
That article is incorrect. Boards that feature the ESS DAC do not reroute the DAC's audio outputs to the rear I/O. The only thing that's dynamic here is the impedance sensing, and I think that's what confused them.




The Strix boards use the codec's built-in headphone output, which then goes through a voltage gain stage (because it needs voltage gain) and then a buffer stage. In contrast, the Maximus boards bypass the codec's analog output's entirely, utilizing i2S to send the digital stream to the ESS DAC, which is then buffered by a RC4580. The ES9023 already outputs 2V, so it doesn't need the voltage gain stage, and it's analog output is arguably 'better' than the codec's native analog output.

Hope this clears things up...

-Raja

I am going to be using the rear output to plug in my headphones on a z370 Maximus board. How will the quality differ from using the front output?

Raja@ASUS
12-04-2017, 08:40 AM
I am going to be using the rear output to plug in my headphones on a z370 Maximus board. How will the quality differ from using the front output?


Subjectively, may lack dynamic punch in comparison to the fp.

xyrium
01-25-2018, 12:51 PM
So, the Maximum Hero IX only uses the ESS DAC on the front panel output (header on the MB)? Therefore, the only way to run a pair of mains and a sub would be to use the 1220 on the rear MB outputs (5 analog and 1 optical), or do I have that backwards? Thanks!


That article is incorrect. Boards that feature the ESS DAC do not reroute the DAC's audio outputs to the rear I/O. The only thing that's dynamic here is the impedance sensing, and I think that's what confused them.




The Strix boards use the codec's built-in headphone output, which then goes through a voltage gain stage (because it needs voltage gain) and then a buffer stage. In contrast, the Maximus boards bypass the codec's analog output's entirely, utilizing i2S to send the digital stream to the ESS DAC, which is then buffered by a RC4580. The ES9023 already outputs 2V, so it doesn't need the voltage gain stage, and it's analog output is arguably 'better' than the codec's native analog output.

Hope this clears things up...

-Raja

Raja@ASUS
01-25-2018, 01:22 PM
So, the Maximum Hero IX only uses the ESS DAC on the front panel output (header on the MB)? Therefore, the only way to run a pair of mains and a sub would be to use the 1220 on the rear MB outputs (5 analog and 1 optical), or do I have that backwards? Thanks!

The ESS DAC has nothing to do with the rear outputs. If using multi-channel, you may be able to use some kind of software rerouting (such as Audio Repeater) to utilize the front outputs for stereo, while the sub is connected to the rear. Whether or not it's a good idea to do that is another matter, though.

xyrium
01-25-2018, 07:00 PM
That breaks my heart, and seems to be an odd way to market something the way they did. THat said, no sound from the sub/ctr orange connector, but sound is fine from main/green connector. Tried both stereo/TRS and mono/TS cables to no avail. SOmething in software? I have SupremeFX set to 5.1 with sub enabled.

New thread?

MrAgapiGC
01-26-2018, 02:04 PM
I found contradicting information @ https://unlocked.newegg.com/article/hands-asus-z270-motherboards

"A new change for ASUS is the inclusion of the DAC and amp on the back of the motherboard. Previously, the fancy audio equipment only worked on the front audio header. So if you plugged your high ohm audiophile headphones into the back, you’d have a bad time.Now, the killer ESS Sabre DAC (and amp) powers both the front and back jacks."

So is the news article correct?

Also, the Strix Z270 series have dual op-amps for headphones, but the more premium ROG Maximus IX series lack this.
Is this because only ROG has the switching mosfets and therefore can use the same op-amp for both rear & front outputs while Strix needs a dedicated op-amp for both front & rear? Otherwise it would seem the Strix series has more powerful headphone output than ROG.

Thank you.


i can say that my hero ix have independent front a back outputs and i can be power independently. and i can say that the z370 have done a good work upgrading the audio cards. That i test. in order to power ohm headphones, that i will own you that since mine only gets 109ohm but i can make as now hear music in my headphones and hear a video in you tube for example in my speakers. Inside options in the supreme FX there is a option that can separate the imput jacks and input devise. also. a playbacks two different audio streams. please check that. they have independent controls, and also activates the audio in windows sound manager. Aside of that you can route the sound in anyway you want. the app is strong. but the new one z370 have beeter audio as power goes. ONLY 1 board can power high ohm headphones on the board back I/o panel. i hope asus can do that in the future. but there are also audio cards, asus have one if you need better audio necessities. so far on my side z270 the audio is the best on any z270 board. and yes I like moves and music. I hard to make a video and show that it works but works.!!!!

kgh00007
01-29-2018, 03:31 AM
Subjectively, may lack dynamic punch in comparison to the fp.

Hi there, I have a Strix Z270E with the SupremeFX S1220A codec. So does this mean that on my MB I should connect my headphones to the front audio connector to make use of the best amplifier on my MB? Dual headphone amplifiers suggests that there is one for front and back, or you could be forgiven for thinking that, but there is no mention of which one you should use in the manual.

The webpage overview mentions Texas Instruments® RC4580 and OPA1688 op-amps, is one for the front and one for the back or what is the story?

I currently have mine connected to the rear output as it gives a cleaner look and the 3.5mm connector on my Sennheiser HDHD558's is ridiculously massive!

Thanks!

Raja@ASUS
01-29-2018, 09:56 AM
Hi there, I have a Strix Z270E with the SupremeFX S1220A codec. So does this mean that on my MB I should connect my headphones to the front audio connector to make use of the best amplifier on my MB? Dual headphone amplifiers suggests that there is one for front and back, or you could be forgiven for thinking that, but there is no mention of which one you should use in the manual.


Only the front panel output passes through the headphone amp stage.



The webpage overview mentions Texas Instruments® RC4580 and OPA1688 op-amps, is one for the front and one for the back or what is the story?



This was already answered in post 11. One opamp provides voltage gain and the other acts as a buffer. They are not for independent outputs.



I currently have mine connected to the rear output as it gives a cleaner look and the 3.5mm connector on my Sennheiser HDHD558's is ridiculously massive!

Thanks!

What sounds better comes down to a variety of things: how much gain the headphones need, their input impedance, how good the cable is that connects the FP output to the case FP (noise pickup). All of these things plus many more will have an impact on perceived sound quality. You will have to test and see which you prefer.

kgh00007
01-29-2018, 10:38 PM
Only the front panel output passes through the headphone amp stage.



This was already answered in post 11. One opamp provides voltage gain and the other acts as a buffer. They are not for independent outputs.



What sounds better comes down to a variety of things: how much gain the headphones need, their input impedance, how good the cable is that connects the FP output to the case FP (noise pickup). All of these things plus many more will have an impact on perceived sound quality. You will have to test and see which you prefer.

Hey, thanks for the reply! It might not be a bad idea to put a line in the manual stating that the headphone amp is only on the front audio connector. I reread some reviews for the Z270E and the reviewers all made the same assumption that I did, that dual op amps meant one for the back and one for the front!

Thanks for the reply and the clarification. I will try out the front and back and see what sounds best!

kgh00007
02-13-2018, 01:18 AM
Just to follow up, my headphones sound much better when connected to the front audio output. There is much more dynamic range and bass is much stronger and better defined! I have Sennheiser HD558's.

I never tested them in the front output before as I thought that dual headphone op amps meant that there was one each for the front and rear outputs!

Now I just have to figure out a way to make the wiring look tidy!😉

Korth
02-13-2018, 03:40 AM
This thread is not as informative as actual specs or datasheets for Realtek S1220/S1220A parts ... but it has still been very informative.

The only technical information which has been available so far has been (often incorrect) ASUS marketing and (rarely unbiased) independent testing/comparison reviews.

xyrium
02-19-2018, 03:19 AM
This thread is not as informative as actual specs or datasheets for Realtek S1220/S1220A parts ... but it has still been very informative.

The only technical information which has been available so far has been (often incorrect) ASUS marketing and (rarely unbiased) independent testing/comparison reviews.

Can you post a link to those spec sheets? I don't see either of them on the Realtek site.

Korth
02-19-2018, 06:07 AM
I cannot post any links to datasheets because there are no datasheets in public domain. S1220/S1220A are custom ALC1150 parts made by Realtek for ASUS. As far as I know, nobody else can buy these parts or obtain their datasheets.

I think it's fairly obvious this is a deliberate decision by ASUS, they want a feature-rich high-spec audio codec that none of the other motherboard manufacturers (particularly copycats like Gigabyte and ASRock) can use on their own products.

Raja@ASUS
02-19-2018, 06:46 AM
This thread is not as informative as actual specs or datasheets for Realtek S1220/S1220A parts ... but it has still been very informative.

The only technical information which has been available so far has been (often incorrect) ASUS marketing and (rarely unbiased) independent testing/comparison reviews.

Even if the sheets were online, the only difference between the A and non-A is that the former lacks i2s outputs. As a result, the A is a cheaper part.

These parts have been available to every vendor for some time.

xyrium
02-19-2018, 01:31 PM
THanks Raja. Indeed other manufacturers are using this part, and with good reason. It certainly is producing high quality audio. In fact, it's allowed me to bypass my external DAC, and take the outputs directly to my amp with astounding results.

Korth
02-19-2018, 01:44 PM
I'm surprised these S1220x parts aren't used on ROG laptops. Desktop boards have slots for discrete sound cards, if desired. Laptops don't have the greatest speakers but they could certainly make good use of highest-quality headphone audio. Although the steel RF shield suggests this part is sensitive to EMI/RFI so it needs to be isolated for best performance, maybe the interior of a technologically-dense gaming laptop is not a good environment for it.

xyrium
02-19-2018, 09:19 PM
Indeed, though they certainly add a few voltage and current stabilizing components to the audio build that might not fit within the confines of your typical laptop environment. THe DAC is certainly not the only component responsible for the excellent sound coming out of this board.

It would be excellent however, because the design has enough preamp power to send a signal to any amplified speaker, or an amplifier itself, as I am doing.

Raja@ASUS
02-20-2018, 01:52 AM
I'm surprised these S1220x parts aren't used on ROG laptops. Desktop boards have slots for discrete sound cards, if desired. Laptops don't have the greatest speakers but they could certainly make good use of highest-quality headphone audio. Although the steel RF shield suggests this part is sensitive to EMI/RFI so it needs to be isolated for best performance, maybe the interior of a technologically-dense gaming laptop is not a good environment for it.

Would be a waste considering these codecs have 8 output channels. Good USB dacs are a better bet.

xyrium
02-20-2018, 03:20 PM
Of the USB DACS I've had:

Opps HA-1
Nuprime DAC-9
Teac UD-301

None of which would be considered high end, but all were surpassed by the onboard design of my Hero IX. One of the reasons is the ability to adjust gain on the MB, whereas that wasn't possible via USB. Gain staging is critical to component matching.

Finally, I had no problem with my Teac or Oppo, but the DAC-9 exhibited all kinds of noise via USB, as reported by many users or many outboard DACs, high end or otherwise.

So, while I would agree with you that the quality should be better with an outboard DAC, just as we can't judge a DAC by it's chip, we honestly can't generalize quality by the number of channels, or otherwise. Just my $0.02, though Raja, you clearly have far more in depth knowledge than myself, so I simply disagree very respectfully.

Raja@ASUS
02-21-2018, 02:12 AM
I did say good USB DACs. ;) A DAC with good USB isolation (galvanic) and a decent output stage helps a great deal. As you said yourself, the stuff you've tested doesn't necessarily qualify in these categories. Gain structure depends on what one is connecting to the output of the DAC. If it's headphones, then things can matter a great deal depending on how difficult the cans are to drive and the gain/buffering of any downstream stage.

FWIW, I roll my own USB DACs. Plenty of kits out there for people of similar mind. That said, even my Essence III floors the mb output (I use Sennheiser HD800s (balanced config) and Bose QC25s for most of my listening).

And the comment regarding output channels is in reference to the fact that laptops aren't spec'd for 7.1 output. Stereo output and a mic input is all that is used. These codecs have an excess of channels for that scenario, hence the comment.

xyrium
02-21-2018, 02:45 AM
:) SInce both the DAC-9 and the HA-1 are rather highly regarded, I'd say that they're pretty good. Even with the overbuilt power supply, the discrete class A output section, and dual ESS 9018s; the HA-1 still didn't surpass what I'm getting out of this Hero IX 1220 board into a Nuprime STA-9, into a pair of Dynaudio Emits. The timbre of instruments is just astounding. It almost makes me want to purchase one of the Asus sound cards, such as the Strix Raid DLX or the Essence just to see what Asus can really do with audio.

Bottom line, some components, when matched well electrically, just sing. The combo of the onboard audio of the Hero IX with my amp, is just magic right now. Seriously, it's almost embarrassing given the components in my main rig, and some of the high end stuff that I've heard.

I don't want to hijack this thread too much, but talk to me about your home brew DACs...Raspberry Pi I suppose?

Riekopo
02-21-2018, 06:05 AM
Whoa wait a minute. I stumbled upon this thread and now I'm concerned about my audio setup. I have an Asus Crosshair VI Extreme mobo and am using a new Sennheiser GSP 600 headset with it. I've been using the rear audio ports because I can't get the front panel audio ports to work at all. My case is a Corsair Air 540 case.

Am I getting lower quality audio by using the rear ports?

xyrium
02-21-2018, 01:19 PM
I don't use my onboard audio for gaming, though the headphones you mention shouldn't be difficult for any amp to drive at only 28 Ohms. IME, the rear outputs powered by the 1220 have been excellent in quality. Do you have the internal header connected to your case front output ports?

Raja@ASUS
02-21-2018, 03:43 PM
:)

I don't want to hijack this thread too much, but talk to me about your home brew DACs...Raspberry Pi I suppose?

A quick Google search for diy dac should turn up plenty of results. There's something for everyone.

For my personal system, no raspberry pi. It needs a few resistor changes on the i2s lines to reduce ringing. I use my pc as a source into an Amanero plus isolator/synchronous reclocker combo. That feeds an akm4490 dac that's buffered by a balanced output stage. Power supplies are sub 20nvrthz noise across the audio band on critical lines. No on-board or soundcard I've used comes close - and I've had plenty. I'm loathe to give my money to people for lesser parts or cookie cutter designs that command extortionate prices.

xyrium
02-21-2018, 10:15 PM
A quick Google search for diy dac should turn up plenty of results. There's something for everyone.

For my personal system, no raspberry pi. It needs a few resistor changes on the i2s lines to reduce ringing. I use my pc as a source into an Amanero plus isolator/synchronous reclocker combo. That feeds an akm4490 dac that's buffered by a balanced output stage. Power supplies are sub 20nvrthz noise across the audio band on critical lines. No on-board or soundcard I've used comes close - and I've had plenty. I'm loathe to give my money to people for lesser parts or cookie cutter designs that command extortionate prices.

NIce. I don't possess the skills to tweak one, but that 4490 has a nice selection of filters.

Every now and then a brand comes out with something unique. Dual DAC, dual differential balanced supplies and output stages, and some even provide direct access to the filter choices on the 4490, like the Teac 503. THe DAC-9 I had utilized the 4490, but they must have chosen a steep slope, I feel like imaging suffered. Either way, great chip and seems like something that designers haven't found difficult to design around. THe key is maintaining resolution at low volume without truncating bits if this is for a desktop system. I'm thinking keeping it simple is the way to go...

Raja@ASUS
02-21-2018, 11:39 PM
It isn't that difficult to configure software volume control with sufficient bit headroom. That said, if you can't do that and most of your listening is at volumes so low that you're near maximum cut, I guess you need to look at gain structure...heh.

As far as dacs go, until one has the means to experiment properly, gauging the impact of topologies is also difficult. A commercial dac may have the latest buzzword in tech, but have compromises in other areas along the chain. Makes it difficult for the layman (technically, if you can't swap component parts of the dac out to gauge their impact in a given circuit, you are a layman) to judge what is good and what makes a real difference.

xyrium
02-22-2018, 01:59 AM
Totally agree with you. I think the best prefab box on the market for the price now is by Pro-ject. Either their digital pre or the DAC DS2. If the parts quality in the DAC DS2 are even close to the pre digital, it's the bargain of the year.

http://www.box-designs.com/inhalt/en/pdf/preboxs2digital.pdf

http://www.box-designs.com/inhalt/en/pdf/dacboxds2ultra.pdf

Korth
02-22-2018, 02:36 AM
I'm pretty satisfied with my O2+ODAC (https://www.jdslabs.com/products/48/objective2-odac-combo-revb/). Generally well regarded and well received by the audiophiles, although the designer (NwAvGuy) generated a lot of impassioned love-or-hate controversy in the audiophile communities (especially with his What We Hear (http://nwavguy.blogspot.ca/2012/04/what-we-hear.html) and Op Amps: Myths & Facts (http://nwavguy.blogspot.ca/2011/08/op-amps-myths-facts.html) articles). This is not quite a "perfect" device, it does have minor flaws, but it is excellent and (to my ears) was the best of many that I've personally tried out (as of mid-2015, anyhow, there might be newer/better devices now).

xyrium
02-22-2018, 04:18 AM
Absolutely. I had the O2 headphone amp, great little box. The controversy over the designer is certainly interesting, though I've placed it behind me at this point, in respect for the simplicity of his designs, and his integrity to challenge the status quo. That DAC is sure to rock!

fido
02-19-2019, 07:00 PM
for info the ROG STRIX Z390-E GAMING Have CODEC S1220A and in their website its very clearly stating to handle : "With two op-amps on-board you're able to pump exceptional audio to your favorite cans, with 32-600Ω-headphone impedance for great flexibility."


so if anyone have an audiophile headphone he should be able to drive the full volume without an issue. regarding the noise or interference ofc the dedicated out of the case Sound card is going to be better.

:) if anyone have an asus motherboard who can confirm running a headphone with 250ohm or above would be nice <3

78967

the link:

https://www.asus.com/us/Motherboards/ROG-STRIX-Z390-E-GAMING/overview/

xyrium
02-19-2019, 07:23 PM
I've used Beyer DT880/600s and Senn HD58xx/300's without a problem, and that's compared to an Oppo HA-1, and Topping A30.

Are you having problems with it? Lack of authority, or volume?