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View Full Version : Anyone Used G752VS for Ethereum Mining and will it Burn Out the GPU?



skweggnog
09-08-2017, 02:37 AM
Anyone done any alt coin mining at all using a g series laptop? Seems to go alright just don't want to burn out my gpu as I can't imagine it would be a cheap fix or does anyone have any advice as to using an external gpu instead on the internal gtx1070? Any advice would be appreciated.

Darnassus
09-08-2017, 03:15 AM
Would prefer external GPU. But mining's useless unless you make a rig for it.. no point doing it on a laptop..

The time and money you invest in it, you'll actually spend more as well on electricity than you did earning. That's unless the price of the coin goes up by like.. 100 times in the future.

MrRuckus
09-08-2017, 03:51 PM
Ethereum is just gonna push the GPU like any game would. Its not going to work any harder. If you're fine gaming, mining would just be more of the same. I dont think you have anything to worry about.

Darnassus
09-08-2017, 04:28 PM
Ethereum is just gonna push the GPU like any game would. Its not going to work any harder. If you're fine gaming, mining would just be more of the same. I dont think you have anything to worry about.

I agree, but most likely he's going to leave the thing mining for days.. the laptop can't sustain that. :f

Korth
09-08-2017, 04:32 PM
As more people start mining coins the payoff per coin mined is diminished (by design) to stabilize coin values and control inflation, and a lot more people are suddenly getting into mining now because it was reasonably profitable before. So I think coin values are very unlikely to dramatically increase and they are likely to gradually decrease.

Electrical power prices vary. Most power utilities implement a "tiered" pricing system where you pay more once specific power consumption thresholds are reached. Mining can be profitable up to a point, but beyond that point it costs more money to run (in electricity) than it generates (in coins).

A desktop computer is poor economy for mining, the price of good hardware is very high while the return (in terms of hash outputs) is very medium. A laptop computer is even worse because, all other things being equal, it costs substantially more and it runs weaker-performing hardware. A higher-end gaming laptop is pretty much the very worst possible bang-for-the-buck choice you could make - you paid a premium for mobility and for awesome screen and audio and keyboard and all the rest, and you're planning to plunk the thing onto a desk where it will be largely ignored while it crunches and churns. I think you'll actually be losing money once you factor in the price of replacing your dead/dying laptop after 2-3 years, the profit margins are already edgy for people with low-cost middling-performance desktop platforms.

Heavy mining runs heavy load on the GPU(s), nonstop 24x7x365. Yes, this keeps the GPU (and other) hardware running hot and heavy, it'll definitely age from the abuse after a couple years. The laptop battery and laptop cooling system(s) will also wear out quickly, laptops (even the mightiest killer gaming laptops) simply aren't designed to run the sorts of sustained abuse that decent desktops can endure.

MrRuckus
09-08-2017, 11:33 PM
I agree, but most likely he's going to leave the thing mining for days.. the laptop can't sustain that. :f

I can agree with that. I guess I was thinking of a day or 2 wouldn't be a problem, you get into weeks and months, I wouldn't do that. The laptop simply isn't designed for it as others have stated. Anything with moving parts is bound to fail, its just the matter of when. I've seen plenty of fans in my days die after a few years use. Mostly on desktop GPU's. PSU Fans, case fans, CPU heatsink fans. For instance my desktop is on 24/7/365. I recently did a complete tear down and had to replace many of the fans due to either being locked up or barely moving.

So I guess on second thought, it would depend on how long we're talking about mining. Constantly? No, I would advise against it.

Korth
09-08-2017, 11:46 PM
Imagine running a moving company. You can make a lot of money if you've got big trucks and trailers. You can still make some money with just a pickup truck. But trying to haul heavy cargo around in a Lamborghini is not going to be profitable.

Darnassus
09-09-2017, 06:17 PM
Imagine running a moving company. You can make a lot of money if you've got big trucks and trailers. You can still make some money with just a pickup truck. But trying to haul heavy cargo around in a Lamborghini is not going to be profitable.

Probably the solid nail on the coffin, sorry OP. :f

You need a proper rig, and not only that NVidia's not the way to go..

You need AMD cards, since they have much higher hash rate.. and that'd namely be the R9 series cards, R9 295X2 to me more specific.

And of course, if they let ASICs for whatever reason join the hive.. you're.. well.. rectally violated, firmly and your efforts wasted. :c

Mining was OSOM back in the days, or simply buying.. but now it's just a waste of time for small game miners. We missed the inflation spike.

Gawh I remember when Bitcoin was $200 each.. now they're up to like $4000..

Korth
09-10-2017, 09:39 PM
To me a "proper rig" for mining is not a PC. It's a purpose-built ASIC platform like an Antminer (https://www.bitmain.com/). The difference between using your PC to make a few extra bucks vs buying the right tool for the job of making money.

Darnassus
09-11-2017, 05:23 AM
To me a "proper rig" for mining is not a PC. It's a purpose-built ASIC platform like an Antminer (https://www.bitmain.com/). The difference between using your PC to make a few extra bucks vs buying the right tool for the job of making money.

ASICs cannot crunch Ethereum, they purposely deny ASIC chips from being able to process the code.

That and people won't bother to write programs to do it since the people who control Ethereum make it harder.

Ethereum just want GPU's I believe to keep the speed of crunching low, otherwise too many coins go out.

Also, the VRAM on GPU's I believe is far superior to an ASIC. However the ASIC will be much more power efficient. ;x

Don't quote me, all a theory.

Korth
09-11-2017, 07:21 AM
Don't quote me, all a theory.
lol more than a theory.

Seems mining has changed somewhat since late 2014.

I've learned that old Bitcoins weren't "regulated" enough: soaring inflation, volatile value fluctuations, exchanges being shut down, large/rich groups ("whales") would mine and dump huge Bitcoin batches ... while "real" value and stability for Bitcoins (or for any fungible currency/commodity) requires some hoarding to balance supply and demand. The "whales" were basically doing the equivalent of printing money and promptly liquidating (selling) it into other currencies to scrape maximum profit.

Ethereum - Ethash (https://github.com/ethereum/wiki/wiki/Ethash) - is indeed designed to be ASIC resistant. It makes existing ASIC-based units impractical, it (supposedly) uses memory/resources in ways which would be less cost-effective to manufacture on ASICs than on GPUs, it also "validates" the hardware by confirming it is a registered GPU type and not a registered ASIC type. All to keep the "whales" on even footing with "the little guy", so coins stay precious.

But even that's changing. You can't stop big money from buying big money, lol.
https://www.google.ca/search?q=Geass+P1-200

Darnassus
09-11-2017, 01:58 PM
But even that's changing. You can't stop big money from buying big money, lol.
https://www.google.ca/search?q=Geass+P1-200

yap I saw that.. I facepalmed as to why they tried.

Korth
09-12-2017, 03:39 AM
Those "ASIC" machines are still cheaper, more productive, and more efficient than gaming laptops, lol. Lower hardware cost, lower power consumption (cost), higher output.