PDA

View Full Version : Undervolting G752 Questions



Gallros
09-28-2017, 09:31 PM
Hey, been watching alot of videos about undervolting the cpu and so on to keep it at a lower temp..


Normal:
Cpu temp: around 75c when i play most of my games. (and yes, i know this temp is nothing to worry about so dont bother bringing that up :P )

Undervolting -0.150V
Cpu temp: around 65c when i play the same games.

So my first question for you PROs are :

Will the 10c be better for my CPU/whole laptop in the long run?
Saves me some fan noise aswell + that it will also take in less dust ;) )
and i've heard the batterylife is greatly improved aswell ^^ some say around 40%.. i have not tried yet thou.

Second question:

If i already managed to get the system stabil, are there any downsides to undervolting?
And could it damage my cpu/computer in any way in the long run whatsoever?




Computer: G752VS
Gpu: Nvidia GTX 1070 DDR5 @ 8gb (256-bit)
Cpu: Skylake i7 6700 @ 2.6Ghz (not the overclockable version)


Thanks in advance!

/Kim

Gallros
09-29-2017, 08:19 PM
Anyone with any knowledge/experience of undervolting here? :)

Clintlgm
09-29-2017, 08:32 PM
Suggest you check out Dreamonic (http://voltground.com/haven/threads/30/) he has lots of experience.

unclewebb
09-30-2017, 02:44 AM
Intel has always used extra voltage. This allows Intel to guarantee long term stability without having to do a lot of long term stability testing. Imagine how much CPUs would cost to produce if Intel had to do 24 hour Prime95 type testing on every CPU that came down the assembly line. Much easier and cheaper to just bump up the voltage a hair.

For most laptop owners, this results in a lot of wasted energy. The extra heat will require more fan noise and will also reduce run time when running on battery power. Not good.

Enthusiasts learned that if they did their own testing, they could safely and reliably reduce the CPU voltage significantly. As long as you take the time and are able to pass a wide variety of stability tests, there is nothing negative about under volting. It is not unusual for a CPU to need slightly more voltage after it initially breaks in. That's why it is not a bad idea to run some stability tests every few months just to confirm that the voltage that you came up with is still adequate, and your CPU is still 100% stable.

Gallros
09-30-2017, 05:26 AM
Thanks for the answers!

That made me a lot wiser tbh :D

I'll do some heavy testing now to see what's the lowest i could go for my computer atm, and keep on checking it every now and then. :)

Thank you once again!

hmscott
12-02-2017, 02:49 AM
Intel has always used extra voltage. This allows Intel to guarantee long term stability without having to do a lot of long term stability testing. Imagine how much CPUs would cost to produce if Intel had to do 24 hour Prime95 type testing on every CPU that came down the assembly line. Much easier and cheaper to just bump up the voltage a hair.

For most laptop owners, this results in a lot of wasted energy. The extra heat will require more fan noise and will also reduce run time when running on battery power. Not good.

Enthusiasts learned that if they did their own testing, they could safely and reliably reduce the CPU voltage significantly. As long as you take the time and are able to pass a wide variety of stability tests, there is nothing negative about under volting. It is not unusual for a CPU to need slightly more voltage after it initially breaks in. That's why it is not a bad idea to run some stability tests every few months just to confirm that the voltage that you came up with is still adequate, and your CPU is still 100% stable.
Thanks for the comments supporting undervolting. *It's so easy to do and gives back so much to the owner, reducing CPU temps by up to 10c under heavy 100% CPU load, dropping the load temperatures under the thermal throttling point, and avoiding the need for re-pasting.

I've actually noticed that I can undervolt more over time, rather than seeing an increase in voltage needed. *I had one G750JH that undervolted @ -15mV maximum when I first got it, but over the 2 years I had it I was slowly able to increase the undervolt to -60mV, and that small improvement improved thermals even more.

I have seen heavily OC'd desktop CPU's require more voltage over time. *I had an Intel 920 OC running SETI@home 24/7 and it did start crashing after a couple of years, and I needed to reduce the OC or increase the voltage, so I reduced the OC and decreased the voltage a bit too in an attempt to extend the life of the CPU.

That's the other benefit of undervolting, besides dropping below the thermal throttling point - if you are exceeding it to begin with - the undervolted reduced temps under all conditions should help extend the life of the CPU.

Maybe it's what helps improve the voltage undervolt vs the hot/high OC CPU voltage needing more over time?

Thanks again for all your helpful posts :)**