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View Full Version : How to recover, backup ASUS GL752 VW?



3dcal
12-26-2017, 08:07 AM
Besides backing up data, what do you do in advance to recover or repair an ASUS GL752 VW running Windows 10?

I have most of my data on external drives, and I also clone my main drive just in case, but not sure what else
I should do.

E.g. is this app (https://neosmart.net/EasyRE/) worth getting?

azwxguy
12-28-2017, 11:10 AM
There are a variety of ways to save off a backup. I do the very basic with a monthly Windows backup to an external drive. I used an Acronis product for a number of years, and, knock on wood, never had to rebuild a drive. Hard drives have become very dependable in recent years. Looks like Easy Recovery Essentials has some recommendations from the industry. With so many of the Windows utilities automated in the background now, it would be nice if a periodic backup could be run automatically. I think this is only possible with Windows 10 Pro. Bottom line, your data safety is only as good as your last backup.

3dcal
12-29-2017, 03:43 AM
Thanks for the info.
Have you created a bootable recovery flash drive?

JustinThyme
12-29-2017, 04:05 AM
The app you listed is class 1 Grade A garbage. Any of those fix your PC apps run the risk of trashing it instead.

Time proven method for me.
Right out of the gate buy a new drive
Clone your OEM drive to the new one
Remove your OEM and put it in a drawer somewhere for safe keeping
This allows you to always have the option to go back to factory state and should the machine need servicing you can just pop the OEM drive in and send it off without having to worry about any sensitive data wipes etc.

A NAS is worth the investment. They can be set up in several raid configuraitons to give you redundancy. I run raid 10 on mine. Yes this does give you half the usable storage but 100% redundancy with little overhead as well as the speed bump of raid0. Raid 5 is also nice as it allows more of the dirve space to be used, basically total of all drives less one drive for parity. These can take a single drive failure and will rebuild the array when you replace it. There is also raid6 that gives two drive failure capability. Problem with these is there is a good bit of overhead in reading and writing and failures typically happen when the drives are ending their life span of about 5 years. If you lose one and replaced it the rebuild is going to be banging the rest of the told tired drives for a day or two and could cause another to fail before the rebuild is complete.

Along with the NAS I use Acronis to back up. When configured correctly it only does one full back up then every back up after is only what has changed instead of a full back up every time that eats up space quickly.

And as a final level of redundancy my NAS does an encrypted back up to the cloud every month. The cloud service for that much data does come at a price but the piece of mind is worth it for me. I have multiple machines that back up to my NAS and I could lose them all in a catastrophic event and still have all the data stored off site.

How far you want to take it is up to your and how senstive and/or valuable your date is. As corney as it sounds, my most valuable data to me.......Pics and videos of my kids growing up, scanned documents like birth certificates and passports, licensces, college degrees, contact info for life insurance should my wife put out a hit on me as Im worth far more dead than alive..LOL

3dcal
12-29-2017, 04:07 PM
The app you listed is class 1 Grade A garbage. Any of those fix your PC apps run the risk of trashing it instead.
Just as I suspected.


Right out of the gate buy a new drive
Clone your OEM drive to the new one
Remove your OEM and put it in a drawer somewhere for safe keeping
This allows you to always have the option to go back to factory state and should the machine need servicing you can just pop the OEM drive in and send it off without having to worry about any sensitive data wipes etc.Great idea.
I've cloned my drives with EasyMigragtion......it was easy, and saved my sanity. I didn't do it to the brand new OEM in the laptop. But will next time.


A NAS is worth the investment. They can be set up in several raid configuraitons to give you redundancy. I run raid 10 on mine
Sounds like a primo strategy......too complicated and expensive for me, though.

I put all my data on 2TB Seagate external drives, and back them up to a 4TB drive, until they're full.
Pictures are the most important for me, too. And things I've done with Blender and other 3d apps.
Too much stuff!

Cloning & incremental backups are probably the most practical for me.
I'll check out Acronis.
Thanks for the good advice. :cool: