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  1. #1
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    Question Minimum vcore allowed for my 8700K @4.8GHz is 1.296v due VID?

    Hi everyone,

    I understand that the Adaptive voltage setting cannot/will not deliver a vcore voltage lower than what the CPU's VID will allow for a specific frequency.

    That being said, doesn't 1.296v seem to be a rather high minimum vcore setting for Intel to hard code into a chip? The vcore reading was confirmed by HWMonitor, XTU, as well as the TPU section of AI Suite.

    When I set the voltage manually by disabling CPU SVID Support in the BIOS, I was able to get my chip stable at 4.8GHz with only 1.25v (possibly even less - I haven't tried anything lower than that yet).

    I would like to use the Adaptive setting instead of the manual option because this computer will be idling a lot throughout the day, so no point pushing the full amount of voltage through all the time.

    But whenever I turn Adaptive mode on (therefore also enabling CPU SVID Support), I can't seem to get the vcore any lower than 1.296v at 4.8GHz. In the "Additional Turbo Mode CPU Core Voltage" setting, I put in 1.25v...I even tried putting in 1.200v just to see if it would make any difference, but regardless, I'm still seeing vcore hit 1.296v in Windows with either setting.

    Below are my settings & hardware. Please let me know if you need any additional information. I'd appreciate any help/advice you can give me to get Adaptive mode working properly if this isn't indeed an issue with CPU VID. Thank you.

    Maximus X Hero
    8700K
    2x G.Skill Trident Z 16GB 3000MHz (using XMP settings)
    NZXT Kraken X62
    Seasonic Snow Silent 750W

    Sync All Cores: Enabled
    BCLK: 100
    Core Multiplier: 48
    CPU SVID Support: Enabled
    CPUVID Behavior: best case scenario
    LLC Level 5
    IA AC Load Line & IA DC Load Line: 0.01
    Additional Turbo Mode CPU Core Voltage: 1.25 (also tried 1.20, it made no difference, readings were still 1.296v for vcore)
    Offset Voltage: Auto
    Intel SpeedStep: Enabled
    Intel SpeedShift: Enabled
    Turbo Mode: Enabled
    CPU C-States: Enabled, all at their default settings
    Package C State Limit: CPU Default
    CFG lock: disabled
    Last edited by pkennethv; 03-21-2018 at 01:06 AM.

  2. #2
    ROG Enthusiast Array av3nger PC Specs
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    Hello pkennethv ,

    Please correct me if i am miss understanding your question. But;

    1.2+ is pretty standard these days especially with the maximus series and the adaptive voltages. Vcore these days doesn't really have a "default" or "minimum" voltage, as it is now determined by the chip itself. CPU lottery plays a large effect in that. You can set the motherboard to put out whatever voltage you want but in a stock setting the board is not going to let the CPU crash, its smart enough to up the vcore. I could be misreading this but if you wanted lower than 1.2 you would have to manually slow the clock speed. However the 1.2 is designed to run with a stock cooler so there is nothing wrong with that. In reality that chip can run at 1.4 (which is quiet high) with proper cooling and be just fine. its not uncommon for users to run about 1.33ish to achieve a 5.0 goal so 1.2xx for 4.7/4.8 your right there and doing well.
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  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by av3nger View Post
    -snip-
    Thanks for your reply, av3nger.

    It's not that I'm trying to get the vcore to be less than 1.2v, but rather, in manual testing (with CPU VID off), I found that I was able to get my chip stable at 4.8GHz using only 1.25v. I am quite happy with 1.25v. In fact, I am trying to get the chip to use 1.25v in adaptive mode.

    The question I have is if that chip is able to be stable at 4.8GHz using only 1.25v, then why, in adaptive mode, is the CPU using 1.296v? Why doesn't the CPU use 1.25v in adaptive mode, given that I have entered 1.25v into the "Additional Turbo Mode CPU Core Voltage" field in the BIOS?

  4. #4
    Moderator Array Nate152 PC Specs
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    Hi pkennethv

    Adaptive mode has a tendency to overvolt a little higher than in manual mode and it looks like 1.296v is the VID which you can't go lower without an offset.

    In the bios on the extreme tweaker tab, try setting the offset mode sign to - (negative) and enter in 0.046v, this should put the cpu voltage at or very close to 1.250v.

  5. #5
    Tech Marketing Manager HQ Array Raja@ASUS's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by pkennethv View Post
    Hi everyone,

    I understand that the Adaptive voltage setting cannot/will not deliver a vcore voltage lower than what the CPU's VID will allow for a specific frequency.

    That being said, doesn't 1.296v seem to be a rather high minimum vcore setting for Intel to hard code into a chip? The vcore reading was confirmed by HWMonitor, XTU, as well as the TPU section of AI Suite.

    When I set the voltage manually by disabling CPU SVID Support in the BIOS, I was able to get my chip stable at 4.8GHz with only 1.25v (possibly even less - I haven't tried anything lower than that yet).

    I would like to use the Adaptive setting instead of the manual option because this computer will be idling a lot throughout the day, so no point pushing the full amount of voltage through all the time.

    But whenever I turn Adaptive mode on (therefore also enabling CPU SVID Support), I can't seem to get the vcore any lower than 1.296v at 4.8GHz. In the "Additional Turbo Mode CPU Core Voltage" setting, I put in 1.25v...I even tried putting in 1.200v just to see if it would make any difference, but regardless, I'm still seeing vcore hit 1.296v in Windows with either setting.

    Below are my settings & hardware. Please let me know if you need any additional information. I'd appreciate any help/advice you can give me to get Adaptive mode working properly if this isn't indeed an issue with CPU VID. Thank you.

    Maximus X Hero
    8700K
    2x G.Skill Trident Z 16GB 3000MHz (using XMP settings)
    NZXT Kraken X62
    Seasonic Snow Silent 750W

    Sync All Cores: Enabled
    BCLK: 100
    Core Multiplier: 48
    CPU SVID Support: Enabled
    CPUVID Behavior: best case scenario
    LLC Level 5
    IA AC Load Line & IA DC Load Line: 0.01
    Additional Turbo Mode CPU Core Voltage: 1.25 (also tried 1.20, it made no difference, readings were still 1.296v for vcore)
    Offset Voltage: Auto
    Intel SpeedStep: Enabled
    Intel SpeedShift: Enabled
    Turbo Mode: Enabled
    CPU C-States: Enabled, all at their default settings
    Package C State Limit: CPU Default
    CFG lock: disabled
    A few things:

    1) If you set best case, you don't need to set the IA load lines to 0.01 - that's what best case does.
    2) That is the minimum voltage for some CPUs. The only options you have to reduce it involve using a negative offset, or using a lower level of LLC, which will reduce the voltage due to sag.

  6. #6
    ROG Guru: Gold Belt Array Menthol PC Specs
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    CPU quality and voltage requirements can vary by quite a bit, if a CPU needs more voltage than you like there is only one thing you can do, sell it a replace it
    I have been using adaptive vcore for the last 4 or 5 generations without issue once I get it set correctly, and that's by following more experienced peoples recommendations and a little experimentation

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