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  1. #1
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    Unhappy All new boards except Z370 prime-a missing DTS Connect

    This is just a bit of a heads-up and vent from my part.

    I upgraded my Asus Z170 Hero mobo and CPU a few days ago with a Z370 Strix board and new cpu. After setting everything up and doing cabling, getting stable overclock etc. I sat down to watch some netflix and admiring my sorta new build. This is my media centre PC for couch gaming and movies.

    Shortly after the movie starts I notice that my surround sound is not working...aaah I think, of course I need to set it to DTS 5.1. Except there is no such option under the sound settings. At this point I get a bad feeling....surely this expensive board will support DTS Connect?! NO! it does not.

    Asus and other board manufacturers are not paying the licensing fees for DTS Connect or DD Live on their high end boards. This is causing me to do something a bit shocking really. I had to buy a sound card that supports DTS Connect, first manufactured in 2013!. I really don't get the point of having a super nice onboard audio and skimping on DTS, it is so disappointing. Sure I can run 3x2 cables in analogue to my receiver, but really why should I have to do that instead of running one super thin cable. This is in my living room and I don't want cables everywhere.

    The struggle is real.

  2. #2
    Tech Marketing Manager HQ Array Raja@ASUS's Avatar
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    The market has evolved to using HDMI audio, and on gaming motherboards, focusing on stereo headsets driven with HRTF is the order of the day, so you wont see these legacy standards being employed much now. Even I, a multi-channel stalwart, went with a modern HDMI receiver over the ageing devices that can only support surround sound via S/PDIF/Toslink/or analogue inputs. In other words, don't expect it to make a comeback anytime soon. It's no longer a focus and even the companies that make computer speakers noticed a significant downturn in sales since 2011. In fact, many retailers don't even stock multi-channel PC speaker setups anymore. Sadly, the vocal minority who invested in hardware some time ago can't always get what it wants. Just the way things work.
    Last edited by Raja@ASUS; 07-05-2018 at 06:04 AM.

  3. #3
    ROG Guru: Orange Belt Array chevell65 PC Specs
    chevell65 PC Specs
    MotherboardROG Strix Z370-H, ROG Maximus VII Z97
    ProcessorIntel 4790K 4.6GHz, Intel i5 8400, Intel e8600 Wolfdale, Intel Q9650 Yorkfield, Intel E6750 Conroe
    Memory (part number)16GB G.Skill PC3600
    Graphics Card #1GTX 660 OC
    MonitorAsus 23"
    CaseCorsair clear case
    Power SupplyThermaltake
    Keyboard Logitech G15
    Mouse Logitech G9
    OS Windows 10 Pro
    Network RouterDLink DIR-655, Asus AC88
    chevell65's Avatar
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    You can get around that by using a new Samsung 'smart' 4K Blu-ray player which does encode DTS to Dolby digital. Then use the DTS Neural:X setting on the receiver.

    In my opinion using the S/PDIF sounds much better than HDMI pass through when using PC or Blu-ray player.
    Last edited by chevell65; 07-04-2018 at 04:33 PM.

  4. #4
    Tech Marketing Manager HQ Array Raja@ASUS's Avatar
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    That depends on clock jitter, I think. The better receivers have good clock circuits and employ DACs with good jitter rejection (Pioneer receivers measure well in that regard).

  5. #5
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    I have done some reading about HDMI audio from a PC, but information about the topic is a bit sparse and conflicting. I might just get a new receiver but don't completely understand what to get. *I understand that if I connect my GPU to a new receiver via HDMI that movies with embedded DTS, Dolby Digital audio will sound just fine as this encoded audio is passed to the receiver and then the receiver decodes it. The GPU will not encode audio into the DTS or Dolby Digital format.

    What I have trouble getting solid information on is multichannel PCM/LPCM. In other words if I play a game which supports surround sound(as most do) will the game sound be in 5.1/7.1 discrete channels via multichannel PCM/LPCM or just stereo?

    Any clear and confirmed info on the subject would be awesome.

  6. #6
    ROG Guru: Orange Belt Array chevell65 PC Specs
    chevell65 PC Specs
    MotherboardROG Strix Z370-H, ROG Maximus VII Z97
    ProcessorIntel 4790K 4.6GHz, Intel i5 8400, Intel e8600 Wolfdale, Intel Q9650 Yorkfield, Intel E6750 Conroe
    Memory (part number)16GB G.Skill PC3600
    Graphics Card #1GTX 660 OC
    MonitorAsus 23"
    CaseCorsair clear case
    Power SupplyThermaltake
    Keyboard Logitech G15
    Mouse Logitech G9
    OS Windows 10 Pro
    Network RouterDLink DIR-655, Asus AC88
    chevell65's Avatar
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    Pioneer was purchased by Onkyo in 2015 and is now a subsidiary of Onkyo.

    When Onkyo receivers displays PCM it means is 'multi channel PCM' rather than saying LPCM. Although it seems that there is a PCM setting on the receiver's on screen display but says that it's only used when the source can't be played by other formats.

    If you are using say a ps3 for playing games, you should set the sound output on the ps3 to 'bit stream' so the decoding is done on the receiver because it will do a better job decoding Dolby digital and DTS into discrete channels. Games will definitely be output in multiple discrete channels when using a higher end receiver. The receiver will say Dolby digital or DTS Neural:X when broadcasting to multiple discrete channels.

    For HDMI pass through with 4K Blu-ray players it may default to multi channel PCM but the audiophile guys tend to go back and forth on these subjects as to which is being used. For some reason S/PDIF is better for MP3 and FLAC from a PC using onboard sound compared to using HDMI pass through, using S/PDIF has way more punch and more volume compared to using HDMI past through.

    Higher end receivers these days also support Dolby Atmos with up to 9.2 channels but you need a source that supports Atmos such as a 4K Blu-ray player and special Dolby Atmos speakers, Klipsch makes the best ones. My Onkyo tx-nr676 does 7.2 channels, the .2 is for dual sub woofers.
    Last edited by chevell65; 07-05-2018 at 07:26 PM.

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