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  1. #1
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    what happens if I don't charge gl503ge for a few hours for first use?

    I'm bought new asus rog gl503ge about 2 weeks ago. In manual book, it's written that you have to charge the laptop for 3 hours while the laptop is off. But I don't do it, I immediately used it for a few hours when the laptop turned on and was plugged into AC.
    my wear level is 4%. here the battery info:


    My question is, since I don't charge the laptop for 3 hours in first use, Does it's affect on the battery lifespan ?
    Should I do battery calibration ?

    Thanks,,
    Last edited by fudanshi13; 08-23-2018 at 06:28 PM.

  2. #2
    ROG Guru: Black Belt Array Korth PC Specs
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    Google "battery conditioning" ... the Li-ion or Li-poly cells in your laptop are the same technology as those in smartphones and tablets (and don't buy into the hype, these batteries have been using the same chemistry for decades, they're constantly improving in small "evolutionary" increments but there hasn't been anything "revolutionary" about them for a long time).

    Missing out on the initial "conditioning" cycles isn't critical, you can always "recondition" the batteries later. These batteries don't have the controversial "memory effect" which were thought to affect earlier battery technologies, these days the "conditioning" is probably more to calibrate the battery regulator chips and software with a 100% reference baseline.

    Short version is that if you are always conscious of your battery charge/discharge and you rigidly adhere to best-possible patterns then you can extend battery service life to about 3 years, maybe even 5-7 years or longer ... while if you rigidly adhere to the worst-possible practices then you can shorten their service life to 6-12 months.

    Basically:
    - always try to charge batteries to full 100% instead of little opportunistic increments wherever and whenever you can find a plug,
    - avoid charging and discharging the batteries simultaneously (that is, avoid using your machine on external power when the battery is dead) because that exposes the batteries to heat-accelerated aging which will degrades their chemistry and reduces their capacities,
    - avoid storing the batteries (and laptop) unused for long periods of time, it's best to periodically top them off then use them a bit then let them sit another few weeks in a partially-charged state (say 25% to 75% total capacity).

    You'll find plenty of opinions and arguments and personal anecdotes about what works and what doesn't work in the care and treatment of your batteries. I tend to put more weight onto sources who consistently get long battery lives from their tech (3-5+ years) and less weight on those who've never done any systematic side-by-side controlled experiments/testing. When all else fails, the advice of the battery manufacturer (and smart battery engineers) has precedence in this area over the advice of the general public.
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  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Korth View Post
    Google "battery conditioning" ... the Li-ion or Li-poly cells in your laptop are the same technology as those in smartphones and tablets (and don't buy into the hype, these batteries have been using the same chemistry for decades, they're constantly improving in small "evolutionary" increments but there hasn't been anything "revolutionary" about them for a long time).

    Missing out on the initial "conditioning" cycles isn't critical, you can always "recondition" the batteries later. These batteries don't have the controversial "memory effect" which were thought to affect earlier battery technologies, these days the "conditioning" is probably more to calibrate the battery regulator chips and software with a 100% reference baseline.

    Short version is that if you are always conscious of your battery charge/discharge and you rigidly adhere to best-possible patterns then you can extend battery service life to about 3 years, maybe even 5-7 years or longer ... while if you rigidly adhere to the worst-possible practices then you can shorten their service life to 6-12 months.

    Basically:
    - always try to charge batteries to full 100% instead of little opportunistic increments wherever and whenever you can find a plug,
    - avoid charging and discharging the batteries simultaneously (that is, avoid using your machine on external power when the battery is dead) because that exposes the batteries to heat-accelerated aging which will degrades their chemistry and reduces their capacities,
    - avoid storing the batteries (and laptop) unused for long periods of time, it's best to periodically top them off then use them a bit then let them sit another few weeks in a partially-charged state (say 25% to 75% total capacity).

    You'll find plenty of opinions and arguments and personal anecdotes about what works and what doesn't work in the care and treatment of your batteries. I tend to put more weight onto sources who consistently get long battery lives from their tech (3-5+ years) and less weight on those who've never done any systematic side-by-side controlled experiments/testing. When all else fails, the advice of the battery manufacturer (and smart battery engineers) has precedence in this area over the advice of the general public.
    what a amazing explanation
    I usually always plug in the charger whenever use the laptop. when it reach full 100%, I don't unplug the charger. I only unplug it when turning off the laptop. I'm sure modern laptop has auto cut-off feature. Asus has software "ASUS battery health charging". it says if I want "maximum battery lifespan", I must set it to 60% not 100%. So which is the one must be chosen? 60% or 100%?

  4. #4
    TeamROG Moderator Array xeromist PC Specs
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    Li-Ion batteries will last a bit longer when not kept at full charge, especially when stored. That's why that setting is there. However most users will find the life of the battery exceeds the useful life of a laptop anyway. After a few years the hardware becomes so outdated that most people replace the whole machine before the battery gives out. So for most people it's better to have a full charge ready to go but it depends on your pattern of usage.
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  5. #5
    ROG Guru: Black Belt Array Korth PC Specs
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    Quote Originally Posted by fudanshi13 View Post
    I usually always plug in the charger whenever use the laptop. when it reach full 100%, I don't unplug the charger. I only unplug it when turning off the laptop. I'm sure modern laptop has auto cut-off feature.
    The charging systems will not overcharge the batteries. My understanding is that they basically approach or reach 100% (the point where the battery isn't accepting any more charge or more charge isn't changing anything) then poll/test the battery every few minutes and wait until it's drained a little (to 98% or whatever) before activating again. The battery itself has an embedded chip which handles power regulation, mostly a redundant safety feature, but it's usually the cheapest part which does the job and fits the bill (basically just a voltage comparator plugged into some sort of watchdog glue logic) - it signals the device-side software when "100%" is reached because "100%" is actually a relative measure which diminishes over time as the battery capacity gradually erodes away (anode corrosion, electrolyte saturation, dendrite accumulation, etc).

    There's much literature about batteries but more misinformation and disinformation than real facts. A fairly standard expectation is that maximum charge capacity on mobile batteries will reach about 80% of their "new" capacities after roughly 24 months of "typical" use. (Which is not-coincidentally consistent with certain smartphone manufacturers installing "non-replaceable" batteries and forcing the software to kick in a half-crippled "low power mode" at <80% total charge, lol, they want consumers to buy new devices every couple years.)

    @xeromist is correct ... if you don't abuse your battery then you'll probably find it outlasts the useful life of your laptop.

    I should've added to my above post that heat significantly accelerates battery decay. If your machine runs hot and heavy then you can get more months of useful battery life (and more years of useful machine life, and maybe even more performance) by using an external laptop cooling pad. Basically give the thing some airflow, let it suck cooler air in and exhaust heated air out, holding the laptop on your lap is almost the worst thing you could do with it, lol.
    Last edited by Korth; 08-24-2018 at 05:12 AM.
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  6. #6
    ROG Guru: Yellow Belt Array Mr. Fox PC Specs
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    Quote Originally Posted by xeromist View Post
    Li-Ion batteries will last a bit longer when not kept at full charge, especially when stored. That's why that setting is there. However most users will find the life of the battery exceeds the useful life of a laptop anyway. After a few years the hardware becomes so outdated that most people replace the whole machine before the battery gives out. So for most people it's better to have a full charge ready to go but it depends on your pattern of usage.
    I generally agree with this as well. I've never taken any special steps to maximize battery life and I have only needed to replace maybe two or three defective laptop batteries in more than a decade. The replacements outlasted those laptops and battery degradation was nearly indiscernable in normal use. Most have remained plugged in 24/7 and the battery run time was nearly the same after several years as when the laptop was brand new. A constant pattern of draining and recharging seems to be harder on them that leaving the system plugged in most of the time.
    Last edited by Mr. Fox; 08-24-2018 at 06:05 AM.
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