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  1. #1
    ROG Member Array MathiasMagnus's Avatar
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    GL702ZC 32GB RAM installed, 16GB usable

    Hi!

    I am a happy user of a GL702ZC notebook but have encountered a problem. I have bought the machine with 1*16GB RAM and having checked the exact type, I bought a second module. However, Windows tells me only 16GB is usable out of 32GB RAM, 50% is "reserved for hardware". CPU-Z sees both modules, Windows does see 32 as well, but only allows to use 16.

    I have created CPU-Z screenshots to prove the RAM is installed and is really identical to the stock module. I have Windows 10 Education 64-bit (Education is a spin-off of Enterprise). What can I do to have all of my RAM be usable? (LLVM doesn't compile with 16 threads with "only" 16 gigs of RAM, and I want to compile LLVM fairly often.)

    Click image for larger version. 

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  2. #2
    ROG Guru: Orange Belt Array FULLMETALJACKET7's Avatar
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    Try this; open msconfig, boot tab, advanced options. Uncheck "maximum memory" if it isn't already.

  3. #3
    ROG Member Array MathiasMagnus's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by FULLMETALJACKET7 View Post
    Try this; open msconfig, boot tab, advanced options. Uncheck "maximum memory" if it isn't already.
    I already tried that. It was unchecked, so I checked it and the default value was 32768. I clicked OK and Apply. Close, and when prompted to reboot, I did. Nothing changed.

    However I think this is a BIOS related issue. When I open the BIOS, it only advertises 16384 MB. Can it really be that the BIOS does not hand over the second module to the OS?

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  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by MathiasMagnus View Post
    I already tried that. It was unchecked, so I checked it and the default value was 32768. I clicked OK and Apply. Close, and when prompted to reboot, I did. Nothing changed.

    However I think this is a BIOS related issue. When I open the BIOS, it only advertises 16384 MB. Can it really be that the BIOS does not hand over the second module to the OS?

    Click image for larger version. 

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    Only thing that comes in mind - OS restrictions on RAM like in Windows 7. But i didn't found any mentions considering Windows 10.

    Maybe you'll try to reinstall Windows on different part and take a look at results?

  5. #5
    ROG Guru: Yellow Belt Array
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    Yeah if the bios isn’t seeing the full amount it’s not a windows thing.

    try installing only the new module and see how it boots. then add the original (installing them in a different order)..*

  6. #6
    ROG Member Array MathiasMagnus's Avatar
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    Because the machine was RMA-ed once and they messed up assembling the speakers (the housing resonates like crazy when the speakers are loud) I had to tweak it myself. I had to open the bottom lid like 10-15 times already. I just closed it with the screws once more, but I don't know how many assemblies the chassis can take. I'd rather not experiment opening it. I'd sooner flash the BIOS in hopes of it looking for RAM modules once more.

  7. #7
    TeamROG Moderator Array xeromist PC Specs
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    FastM is right. Partial capacity often indicates a physical problem. Either it's badly seated or there is something wrong with the module or slot. The only way to eliminate that possibility is testing by moving modules around.
    * Support disease research with Folding@Home *

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  8. #8
    ROG Member Array MathiasMagnus's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by xeromist View Post
    FastM is right. Partial capacity often indicates a physical problem. Either it's badly seated or there is something wrong with the module or slot. The only way to eliminate that possibility is testing by moving modules around.
    Thank you for all your suggestions. Indeed, the module was not inserted properly. Because the heat pipes are directly above the second slot, it's very hard (and painful) to insert properly.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by MathiasMagnus View Post
    Thank you for all your suggestions. Indeed, the module was not inserted properly. Because the heat pipes are directly above the second slot, it's very hard (and painful) to insert properly.
    "Thread is worthless without pics." (c)

    Let us see your suffer.

  10. #10
    ROG Member Array MathiasMagnus's Avatar
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    A bit late with the picture, but here it is.

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    I would like to congratulate the one who came up with this design. The heat pipes totally obstruct the place where the RAM modules have to be installed. The pre-installed module is the one closer to the PCB, which is easier to install. For those who never installed SO-DIMM modules, they have to be inserted while they are tilted, then press down into the plane where they will reside. The two metal hinges on the side click and secure the module in place. Because the heat pipes are there, the upper/second module has 0 place to be tilted.


    One can either disassemble the entire thing and repaste all the cooling, or just try to lift the pipes enough to insert the module. I would recommend not doing either. One takes a heck of a lot of time and depending on your skill might not be nearly as good as it was before, while the other may damage the PCB. I did a third option which resulted in 2 of my thumbs hurting for a day, but at least it worked. You can slide the module on with minimal (almost 0) tilt if you press hard enough. You have to support the SO-DIMM slot so you don't tear it off the PCB while pressing the module against it. You can support with your thumbs on the places I marked with the arrow while using index/middle fingers to press the module into the slot. The corners are sharp as hell, hence the pain for a day. Take note that the copper connections of the module should barely be visible, take the first module for reference. If the module does not go as deep into the slot as the first did, you'll get partial recognition of the module like I had. Apologies for not having images of the modules actually been inserted, I forgot to take pic and I wouldn't take the bottom off again solely for the sake of a victory pic. It's possible.

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