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  1. #1
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    What is the auto value for LLC on a Asus Maximus X hero

    What's the auto value for LLC for an Asus Maximus X hero. This is because when offset mode of -200 mv makes the CPU unstable with an auto value in LLC.

    But a manual voltage of a 1.04 v (which is EVEN LOWER cpu voltage than an offset mode of cpu voltage of -200mv) with a LLC value of 6 is stable. As in passing 24 hour prime 95, small FFT and blend, with some realbenching/OCC stress test.

    Thanks in advance

  2. #2
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    default or "auto" value depends on other settings in bios
    by absolute default if you dont overclock, it is usually 2 or 3, if you start to tweak, it will rise automatically to value 6 (at least on my M11F)
    for overclocking most suitable values are 6 or 7

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by x-rated View Post
    default or "auto" value depends on other settings in bios
    by absolute default if you dont overclock, it is usually 2 or 3, if you start to tweak, it will rise automatically to value 6 (at least on my M11F)
    for overclocking most suitable values are 6 or 7
    Its strange though the LLC value on auto and 6 seems similar (I am looking at cpu voltage on load).

  4. #4
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    Anything auto in your bios is always doing everything to make the system conservatively stable. In the case of LLC, that most likely means loads of voltage overshoot on load. If you run stock, it might not need a lot, but if you clock it up a bit, it will definitely select an overshooting setting and I would suggest fine tuning it to the closest value compared to non-load voltage and nothing over that.

    TL;DR LLC auto on all auto bios settings or stock. Must calibrate on anything else.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by happyfatgamerzz View Post
    What's the auto value for LLC for an Asus Maximus X hero. This is because when offset mode of -200 mv makes the CPU unstable with an auto value in LLC.

    But a manual voltage of a 1.04 v (which is EVEN LOWER cpu voltage than an offset mode of cpu voltage of -200mv) with a LLC value of 6 is stable. As in passing 24 hour prime 95, small FFT and blend, with some realbenching/OCC stress test.

    Thanks in advance
    Sorry, didn't read the full post In your case, it is very odd that Auto LLC does not make your system stable and 6 does. Maybe it is doing its' guess work based on the very low voltage that you have (1.04v), which might be the case. As in my previous reply, if you are adjusting your voltages, in your case undervolting (how is your CPU even spinning so low ?), I would strongly recommend to manually calibrate LLC, which will greatly help with your voltage control goals, temperatures and general system stability.

    To fine tune your LLC, you should have CPU-Z open, monitor your voltage on low load (i.e. chrome tabs), which should be = to your set manual voltage. Then, run a stress test and monitor how your voltage changes. Without LLC and with a beefy CPU, it should vdroop quite a bit. LLC compensates this based on the selected level. Experiment with different levels to find the closest voltage on load to your manually set voltage, but as a general rule, it should not go higher. In my 8 core 9700k case, that is level 5 for a 5GHz clock at 1.36v, which remains at ~1.344v on load and is the closest at all levels, with Level 6 overshooting to 1.38, which is something that I would not want

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Eclipt View Post
    Sorry, didn't read the full post In your case, it is very odd that Auto LLC does not make your system stable and 6 does. Maybe it is doing its' guess work based on the very low voltage that you have (1.04v), which might be the case. As in my previous reply, if you are adjusting your voltages, in your case undervolting (how is your CPU even spinning so low ?), I would strongly recommend to manually calibrate LLC, which will greatly help with your voltage control goals, temperatures and general system stability.

    To fine tune your LLC, you should have CPU-Z open, monitor your voltage on low load (i.e. chrome tabs), which should be = to your set manual voltage. Then, run a stress test and monitor how your voltage changes. Without LLC and with a beefy CPU, it should vdroop quite a bit. LLC compensates this based on the selected level. Experiment with different levels to find the closest voltage on load to your manually set voltage, but as a general rule, it should not go higher. In my 8 core 9700k case, that is level 5 for a 5GHz clock at 1.36v, which remains at ~1.344v on load and is the closest at all levels, with Level 6 overshooting to 1.38, which is something that I would not want
    Yes correct I am using Hwinfo to monitor temps and voltages to monitor.

    Again why I suspected the LLC value on auto is the issue here is because on offset mode (on LLC auto value) of -200mv , the vcore is still higher (1.07v to 1.06v) on load than the manual vcore (on LLC level 6) setting of (1.04v to 1.054v) on load. Temp wise of course the lower vcore is cooler.

    The lower vcore manual vcore is stable. It passed the prime 95 blend test and OCCT linpack on 24 hour run and games are fine. But the offset mode which has a higher vcore numeric wise on the monitoring software keeps either crashing the benchmarks or has game crashes.

    I mean it works on auto I should just dont bother and get on with life. But it's just very strange. Plus as pc tweakers we are always teaching outselves more vcore = more stability (i mean usual practice).

    The bios version used of this testing is the latest one.

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    Quote Originally Posted by happyfatgamerzz View Post
    Yes correct I am using Hwinfo to monitor temps and voltages to monitor.

    Again why I suspected the LLC value on auto is the issue here is because on offset mode (on LLC auto value) of -200mv , the vcore is still higher (1.07v to 1.06v) on load than the manual vcore (on LLC level 6) setting of (1.04v to 1.054v) on load. Temp wise of course the lower vcore is cooler.

    The lower vcore manual vcore is stable. It passed the prime 95 blend test and OCCT linpack on 24 hour run and games are fine. But the offset mode which has a higher vcore numeric wise on the monitoring software keeps either crashing the benchmarks or has game crashes.

    I mean it works on auto I should just dont bother and get on with life. But it's just very strange. Plus as pc tweakers we are always teaching outselves more vcore = more stability (i mean usual practice).

    The bios version used of this testing is the latest one.
    1. Why are you not using Adaptive mode? I really don't understand why one would use offset mode. Get stability and optimize LLC on manual, then dial in Adaptive.
    2. Did you try other LLC levels? What results do you get?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Eclipt View Post
    1. Why are you not using Adaptive mode? I really don't understand why one would use offset mode. Get stability and optimize LLC on manual, then dial in Adaptive.
    2. Did you try other LLC levels? What results do you get?
    I just want the lowest manual fixed voltage possible and thus lowest temperature (ambient temps here are from 29-33 degrees C).

    At first the only undervolting youtubes were on offset mode. I understand that there's adaptive.

    I mean I could try adaptive , just that to re-do the testing will take time. The only difference I can see from my testing is the level of LLC between 6 and on auto.

    Why would LLC on auto have more instability (even when the vcore voltage is higher) than compared to a level 6 LLC.

    That's all the LLC controls yeah? The vdroop on vcore and nothing else?

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    Quote Originally Posted by happyfatgamerzz View Post
    I just want the lowest manual fixed voltage possible and thus lowest temperature (ambient temps here are from 29-33 degrees C).

    At first the only undervolting youtubes were on offset mode. I understand that there's adaptive.

    I mean I could try adaptive , just that to re-do the testing will take time. The only difference I can see from my testing is the level of LLC between 6 and on auto.

    Why would LLC on auto have more instability (even when the vcore voltage is higher) than compared to a level 6 LLC.

    That's all the LLC controls yeah? The vdroop on vcore and nothing else?
    Well, I've never used "offset" mode, but I guess it should be same as manual, just with an old-school twist to it. With adaptive mode, my voltage is following my load. Currently with discord, youtube, origin downloading and some tabs open I've watched my voltage go 0.8v in cpu-z. If you do not see this mode, remember to enable SVID. If you want to learn how to set it up, check my other posts in this or other threads.

    I am not sure what testing is needed here. You do your overclocking and testing in manual mode or offset, so you know how much voltage you need and then you dial it in adaptive mode. It just doesn't use all the voltage when it is not needed and keeps your cold and silent.

    When your CPU gets heavy load, there is vdroop. You can google the science behind this. To my knowledge and experimentation, what LLC does is it compensates that drop in voltage under heavy load. You choose the level of compensation in your bios under LLC Level. This is something to experiment with and the goal is to have heavy load voltage closest to your set voltage. This is all about control and consistency of your voltage.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Eclipt View Post
    Well, I've never used "offset" mode, but I guess it should be same as manual, just with an old-school twist to it. With adaptive mode, my voltage is following my load. Currently with discord, youtube, origin downloading and some tabs open I've watched my voltage go 0.8v in cpu-z. If you do not see this mode, remember to enable SVID. If you want to learn how to set it up, check my other posts in this or other threads.

    I am not sure what testing is needed here. You do your overclocking and testing in manual mode or offset, so you know how much voltage you need and then you dial it in adaptive mode. It just doesn't use all the voltage when it is not needed and keeps your cold and silent.

    When your CPU gets heavy load, there is vdroop. You can google the science behind this. To my knowledge and experimentation, what LLC does is it compensates that drop in voltage under heavy load. You choose the level of compensation in your bios under LLC Level. This is something to experiment with and the goal is to have heavy load voltage closest to your set voltage. This is all about control and consistency of your voltage.
    I need to also add an important thing to my post regarding AVX. Everything written above is about non-AVX stress testing. In other words, I recommend balancing LLC with non-AVX stress and then working out your AVX settings: either AVX offset or some voltage increase. This is because I notice AVX having insanely huge vdroop compared to non-AVX.

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