Page 4 of 4 FirstFirst ... 2 3 4
Results 31 to 34 of 34
  1. #31
    ROG Enthusiast Array
    Join Date
    Jan 2021
    Reputation
    13
    Posts
    43

    Quote Originally Posted by Coolguy906 View Post
    After I did some extensive research, the red LEDs are blinking because the voltage drop is over a certain amount (personnel guess would around 10-15%), this can due to "Irregular" voltage drop of your PSU, custom cables, cables did not plug in properly...ect. This is a "safety" feature to warn users, also as some users mentioned, you can disable the feature in GPU Tweak II, if you decide your hardware are completely fine.

    This is exactly why I said put a multimeter on the 8pin cables. Previous poster shot that down saying its the card. You cant make a statement like that with incomplete evidence. The red led's only blink if the voltage is not within a fairly tight tolerance. If the lights are blinking then it suggests the video card detected, perhaps only for a split second, the voltage sagging or spiking outside of its tolerance. This could potentially occur right at the start of system boot, right after the power button is pressed. This is why I say someone with the issue should put a multi meter on these 8pin leads and see what is truly happening. If the voltage is indeed sagging for just a split second as the system posts, then you will see it occur on the multimeter. Once the system posts and boots the voltage likely stabilizes and is why in windows everything appears to be fine. Nothing is more accurate however than measuring the actual current right at the pins with a multi meter. If there is truly voltage irregularities at boot you will be able to document that with a multi meter. This is the very first thing I would do if I had this issue in my system, because its a no brainer. Do not always assume that the circuits, which are programmed to respond in a very specific way to voltage are just wrong. I suspect in systems with these blinking leds, that there is most certainly a sag on the 12v rail as the system posts. Likely an extremely brief sag (or spike), perhaps not even a second long, and likely right as the power button is pressed and the system initially surges to life. The video card detects that and the LEDS light up. You get into windows and everything appears fine, because of course by then the 12v rail is stable. One thing that I do find interesting is that from a large portion of people who have reported this problem they are running seasonic power supplies, which are fairly high end units. Id be curious though how those voltage rails are behaving in the first 5 or so seconds after pressing power button

  2. #32
    ROG Enthusiast Array
    Join Date
    Jan 2021
    Reputation
    13
    Posts
    43

    Quote Originally Posted by simsim86 View Post
    it has nothing to do with the psu, a lot of people with many different psus have it. its the card. i have it right no and my voltages are fine.
    Your voltages are fine in windows, according to software monitoring yes. I bet you have no clue of what is occurring with the voltage rails at the precise moment the video card is throwing the warning. You have to test the voltage at the moment of the warning occurring, and in every single case reported here it is right after pressing the power button. As a computer is initially powering on, the voltage can behave differently than it does once the system is fully running and the voltage rails stabilize out. I suspect a very brief voltage sag or spike is occurring right after the power button is pressed. Until someone actually tests it though you will never know. This would be easy to test if anyone here has any electrical knowledge and a multi meter. I would be happy to test it myself but I have never had this issue on my strix 3090, which suggests that my voltage rails are stable through post and boot. Most folks will be. Voltage sagging just a tad right at post wouldnt mean anything is wrong or faulty either. I suspect one way asus could address the issue is to put a delay on when the card starts to monitor for irregularities, so that it will only start monitoring the voltage after a few seconds, likely getting the systems affected past these initial little sags/spikes. I wouldnt want to disable the feature though, as its a good safety feature.
    Last edited by KMagic; 01-21-2021 at 03:50 PM.

  3. #33
    ROG Enthusiast Array Kiriakos-GR PC Specs
    Kiriakos-GR PC Specs
    MotherboardASUS P5QC P45 - 1333MHz
    ProcessorINTEL Q6600
    Memory (part number)G.SKILL-F3-10600CL9D-8GBNT 2x4GB
    Graphics Card #1MSI GTX 1060 6GB OC - iGAMER
    Sound CardCreaive XFi Music
    MonitorDELL U2311H
    Storage #1WD Raptor 75GB 10000 rpm RAID1
    Storage #2WDC_WD1600JS-00MHB1
    CPU CoolerProlimatech Armageddon - Taiwan
    CaseFull tower - HEC - Taiwan
    Power SupplyHIPER HPU-4M780-PE 780W
    Keyboard Microsoft Digital Media 3000
    Mouse Logitech MX510
    Headset/Speakers 2x YAMAHA YST-20 & YAMAHA SUB Woofer
    OS WIN 7 Pro 64 bit RETAIL
    Network RouterASUS GX1105B
    Accessory #1 GELID 12 TC 120mm
    Accessory #2 GELID 12 PWM 140mm

    Join Date
    Nov 2020
    Reputation
    10
    Posts
    53

    Actual 12V rail voltage testing at boot this requiring a quality multimeter at 400$ or EUR, this including Min-Max log (fast speed detection).
    Most Kids out there do not own one, but they might request assistance from a professional at electronics repairs, he has all required tools.

  4. #34
    ROG Enthusiast Array
    Join Date
    Jan 2021
    Reputation
    13
    Posts
    43

    Quote Originally Posted by Kiriakos-GR View Post
    Actual 12V rail voltage testing at boot this requiring a quality multimeter at 400$ or EUR, this including Min-Max log (fast speed detection).
    Most Kids out there do not own one, but they might request assistance from a professional at electronics repairs, he has all required tools.
    I'm not so certain it would require a $400 meter. It may show up just fine on your average ~$50 multimeter that you can buy at Lowes. It depends how fast the voltage dips and recovers. If the dip is incredibly short, meaning milliseconds, then yea the meter might wouldn't catch it, but we have no idea really until someone actually tries. If the dip lasts for anything near a full second a cheap meter will catch it. This test could be performed in literally 5 minutes. Anyone who is into PC building and overclocking should take time to understand some basics in electrical knowledge, and certainly should own a multi meter. Multi meters are so handy around the house for so many reasons. Checking issues like this with computers, checking your house wiring, checking your car battery, Its just a good tool to have on hand. Anyways, until someone with the issue puts in some effort to test their system's 12v rail at system post and boot, particularly on the leads going to the video card, then we don't know. I personally think that a voltage sag is almost certainly occurring, and that is what is triggering these cards to warn of it. These types of warnings are not controlled by software where you can have bugs in a windows environment. This is hard wired circuitry meant to detect an out of bounds voltage. Once the voltage goes out of bounds the circuit sends the warning. Its all but certainly occurring I would think. Its telling that it ALWAYS happens for folks right at boot. I've seen no report of it happening once inside of windows or even in a gaming load. So, the issue is likely one of a totally benign nature and isn't actually a problem. Its likely a natural tick of the system post process causing the voltage to blip for just a fraction of time, and then it recovers, is stable, and system boots into windows. All we can do is speculate though until someone investigates it.

Page 4 of 4 FirstFirst ... 2 3 4

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •