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  1. #1
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    GT-AX11000 Dropping WAN Connection

    Hi All,

    I have two GT-AX11000 routers. One is the main router and I have a second GT-AX11000 which is configured as a mesh router that is hardwired into the primary router.

    Every 12-36 hours I will lose internet on all my devices. I log into the router and it will say "INTERNET STATUS" -> "Dissconceted". I have two options I can unplug the router and plug it back in or click the "gear" icon when logging into the router to reboot it. Then magically it will say "connected" for "INTERNET STATUS" and everything will work again.

    This has nothing to do with my ISP or Fiber modem. This is an issue with the GT-AX11000 dropping the WLAN connection.

    I am running firmware 3.0.0.4.386_45898-gfa90458 which is the latest firmware on both routers. I don't see any beta firmware available.

    I am really pulling my hair out trying to fix this. Any help would be great!

    Thank you!

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by crystalpup View Post
    Hi All,

    I have two GT-AX11000 routers. One is the main router and I have a second GT-AX11000 which is configured as a mesh router that is hardwired into the primary router.

    Every 12-36 hours I will lose internet on all my devices. I log into the router and it will say "INTERNET STATUS" -> "Dissconceted". I have two options I can unplug the router and plug it back in or click the "gear" icon when logging into the router to reboot it. Then magically it will say "connected" for "INTERNET STATUS" and everything will work again.

    This has nothing to do with my ISP or Fiber modem. This is an issue with the GT-AX11000 dropping the WLAN connection.

    I am running firmware 3.0.0.4.386_45898-gfa90458 which is the latest firmware on both routers. I don't see any beta firmware available.

    I am really pulling my hair out trying to fix this. Any help would be great!

    Thank you!
    which router is doing it?
    main or secondary.
    why is it mesh when its hardwired?

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Indigian View Post
    which router is doing it?
    main or secondary.
    why is it mesh when its hardwired?

    Hardwiring your mesh means you will not lost any throughput because there aren't any wireless hops or act as backhaul.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by ahfoo View Post
    Hardwiring your mesh means you will not lost any throughput because there aren't any wireless hops or act as backhaul.
    Doesn't the hard wire negate the need to use mesh though?
    Isn't the idea of mesh networking wifi because you can't hard wire?
    If your hard wired then surely whichever router you wifi into is of a strong stable nature?

  5. #5
    ROG Guru: Yellow Belt Array ahfoo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Indigian View Post
    Doesn't the hard wire negate the need to use mesh though?
    Isn't the idea of mesh networking wifi because you can't hard wire?
    If your hard wired then surely whichever router you wifi into is of a strong stable nature?
    Having a wired backhaul mesh system means having a stable connection with no interruptions or maintenance breaks. It offers a reliable connection due to fewer network interferences. Your work can get done a lot smoother than the wireless option.

    An additional benefit of using a wired ethernet backhaul is that placement of the wifi access points becomes less critical. Because the access points use the ethernet cabling to communicate with each other, they do not necessarily have to be to see each other over a wireless connection or have a strong wireless connection. This means they can be spaced much further apart, even in separate buildings. This illustrated in the image by the bubbles having a smaller overlap and not reaching the other access point. In fact, they do not have to overlap at all, though that would create wifi dead zones.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Indigian View Post
    which router is doing it?
    main or secondary.
    why is it mesh when its hardwired?
    For some reason, ASUS refuses to acknowledge or fix this issue.

    I have two GT-AX11000 which are set up in air mesh node.
    I have a 3 story house 7000 square feet.
    The router on the first-floor is hardwired to the router on the second floor through the walls.
    Every 24 to 36 hours I have my internet drop out for all devices.
    You can go to the router's page and see that it says disconnected from WAN.
    You can click the gear icon on the top of the page and reset the router and everything is fine.

    This is definitely an issue with the air mesh mode.
    I had maid service in my house a few weeks ago and they accidentally clicked the Wi-Fi off button on the second-floor router.
    My internet was working fine for 3 weeks.
    All of a sudden, my wife wants to watch a movie on our 77-inch OLED in the master bedroom and we can't get 4k streaming going.
    I log into the router and it says Wi-Fi off as the Wi-Fi was off on the second router.
    I then turn the Wi-Fi back on and had good streaming internet speeds for the TV then 2 days later I'm back to having my internet die every 24 to 36 hours.

    I figure only about >5% of the entire Asus population uses this feature and that's why it hasn't been fixed.
    They also probably outsource their firmware development and don't put much QA into it in the form of regression and smoke testing.

    Very frustrating as I am writing this with $6,000 worth of ASUS monitors on my desk. 3x PG27UQ .

    ~ Words from a random Technology Executive.

  7. #7
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    I'm having the same issue with my router, but I'm only using a wired backhaul for my mesh routers. I wanted to ensure the best connectivity for all my nodes to get great WiFi coverage everywhere. My nodes never switch over to WiFi. Even when the internet drops, I can log into my router and see both nodes still connected via ethernet. Rebooting the main node via the top-right corner reboot option usually fixes the issue.

    GT-AX11000 as my main router.
    RT-AX92U (x2) as my AiMesh nodes.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by crystalpup View Post
    For some reason, ASUS refuses to acknowledge or fix this issue.

    I have two GT-AX11000 which are set up in air mesh node.
    I have a 3 story house 7000 square feet.
    The router on the first-floor is hardwired to the router on the second floor through the walls.
    Every 24 to 36 hours I have my internet drop out for all devices.
    You can go to the router's page and see that it says disconnected from WAN.
    You can click the gear icon on the top of the page and reset the router and everything is fine.

    This is definitely an issue with the air mesh mode.
    I had maid service in my house a few weeks ago and they accidentally clicked the Wi-Fi off button on the second-floor router.
    My internet was working fine for 3 weeks.
    All of a sudden, my wife wants to watch a movie on our 77-inch OLED in the master bedroom and we can't get 4k streaming going.
    I log into the router and it says Wi-Fi off as the Wi-Fi was off on the second router.
    I then turn the Wi-Fi back on and had good streaming internet speeds for the TV then 2 days later I'm back to having my internet die every 24 to 36 hours.

    I figure only about >5% of the entire Asus population uses this feature and that's why it hasn't been fixed.
    They also probably outsource their firmware development and don't put much QA into it in the form of regression and smoke testing.

    Very frustrating as I am writing this with $6,000 worth of ASUS monitors on my desk. 3x PG27UQ .

    ~ Words from a random Technology Executive.

    I have zero knowledge about mesh,why are you using it what does it do?
    What benefit are you gaining by using mesh?

    I thought it was like a networking of wifi signals interlinked to provide all round coverage?

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Indigian View Post
    I have zero knowledge about mesh,why are you using it what does it do?
    What benefit are you gaining by using mesh?

    I thought it was like a networking of wifi signals interlinked to provide all round coverage?

    Let's pretend you own your house and your neighbor's house.
    You would set up router one in your house.
    You would set up router two in the neighbor's house.
    You could then connect a CAT6 cable between the two routers between the two homes.
    This cable would allow for internet connectivity between the two routers.
    Router one is connected to your fiber internet provider.

    Now as you walk between the homes you will be constantly connected to whatever router is closer in range and provides better signal. Instead of having your connection drop when you walk between the homes. It basically allows multiple routers to broadcast the same SSID (Network Name) and have it intelligently switch based on performance.

    I would hate to walk between the houses and have to manually switch which wi-fi network I'm connected to or have it drop the connection. Now with very large houses you need multiple routers to cover the entire house.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by crystalpup View Post
    Let's pretend you own your house and your neighbor's house.
    You would set up router one in your house.
    You would set up router two in the neighbor's house.
    You could then connect a CAT6 cable between the two routers between the two homes.
    This cable would allow for internet connectivity between the two routers.
    Router one is connected to your fiber internet provider.

    Now as you walk between the homes you will be constantly connected to whatever router is closer in range and provides better signal. Instead of having your connection drop when you walk between the homes. It basically allows multiple routers to broadcast the same SSID (Network Name) and have it intelligently switch based on performance.

    I would hate to walk between the houses and have to manually switch which wi-fi network I'm connected to or have it drop the connection. Now with very large houses you need multiple routers to cover the entire house.
    Thanks for that,its purpose is much clearer now.
    I too use a 2 router upstairs/downstairs setup but not mesh,was wondering if worth it.

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