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  1. #11
    iron man Array kkn's Avatar
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    as cold as posible
    cpu can handle so mutch heat until it shuts down/dies
    the colder the bether over time.
    oc in winter time and regulare in summer time.

  2. #12
    ROG Guru: Diamond Belt Array Zka17's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by tatmMRKIV View Post
    so what ur saying is if i start OCing i should turn my ac down to 70?
    Yes, mate, that's exactly what i'm saying! Cooler the ambient temp is more room you will have for a stable OC.

    As kkn said: "oc in winter time and regular in summer time" - I actually really like this!

  3. #13
    ROG Guru: Yellow Belt Array
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    how biout i hard oc im the winterr with a 3x3 radiator sticking out my window/?
    and reg oc at summer

  4. #14
    iron man Array kkn's Avatar
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    if you did that you would only short out your equipment if theres rain/snow and your rad would clogg up and you had to modified your window/wall+++
    it would only set you back.
    and you had yo get powerful pumps too if so.
    it would only cost too mutch.

  5. #15
    ROG Guru: Yellow Belt Array
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    LOL i live in az it doesnt rain or snow but I see ur point

  6. #16
    ROG Guru: Diamond Belt Array Zka17's Avatar
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    OK, let me try again...

    When it's about computer cooling there are several temperatures to consider. First is the ambient temperature - this is the temp around your system and your system's temp when it's turned off. Then there are the temps at which your each component (CPU, VGA, mobo, RAM, etc.) working when your system is up.

    So, if you have air cooling, then the air at ambient temperature will go through your system and installed heatsinks and will take away some of the heat... Of course, there should be a temp difference between the air (at ambient temp) and the heatsinks (heat produced by your comonents). Cooler the air, more heat can be taken away. The efficiency of the air cooling system can be measured by the so called delta T - the difference between your system's temps and the ambient temp. Higher the delta T, more efficient is your cooling. This delta T is determined in the case of air cooling practically by the surface of the heatsinks and the amount of air going through them - so to increase the efficiency, you have to mount bigger heatsinks (of course, there is a difference between heatsinks too, heatpipes and copper improves them) and/or to increase the airflow (by using better fans, turning on their rpm). Now, if the ambient temps are high (and delta T maintained) your useful temp interval will shrink - because the max values are fixed (components will start throttling) and the min value is increasing.

    If you're going the watercooling way, you will have a third temp - the coolant temperature. And different delta Ts - it will be a temp difference (one delta T) between your components and the coolant, and it will be a difference between your coolant and ambient temps (the other delta T). Of course, determining the overall efficiency of the cooling setup, still the difference between your components and ambient temps will be considered - it's just has two components.

    So, the difference between your components and coolant will be determined by the quality of the waterblocks and most importantly by your pumps - the speed of the coolant. Higher the coolant's speed, more heat can be carried from the waterblocks to the radiators.

    The difference between the coolant's and ambient temps will be influenced by the radiators and the air going through them. Bigger the radiator, higher the surface on which it can dissipate the heat. Higher the airflow through the radiator, better the heat dissipation. The important thing to notice here is that this heat exchange interface will work the same as in the case of the regular air cooling. So, a radiator will be able to reduce the temp of the coolant only at the level of the ambient temp (the air's temp which is going through it).

    Now, let's get to the point when you're influencing the ambient temperature! You can do this in several ways, you can place the whole system is a lower temp environment or, in the case of watercooling, you can place only the radiator setup in a colder area. The main difference between this two possibilities is the temperature of the system itself. Lowering the temps of the air going through the radiator only will result in lower coolant temps, of course. The problem will be that when this coolant gets into your system, may be cooler than the system's ambient temps. And this will cause the humidity from the air to condensate/precipitate on the cooler surfaces (most likely on the tubing) - just remember when you're taking a bottle of water out from a refrigerator, it's surface will become wet rapidly, or just check your car's A/C tubing... Now, this precipitated water is what you don't want in your computer!

    The peltier's problem is exactly the same, they will cool below the ambient temps and will cause condensation.

    Lowering the ambient temp for the overall system (both components and radiators) thus is the best way to keep your computer cool.

    Of course, you still can play around with having the radiators in a lower ambient temp... Your components will run at higher temps then your system's ambient temperature. Having the radiators at the same ambient temp, can not maintain the coolant's temp at that ambient temp (there will be always some difference - the delta T). So, placing the radiators in a lower ambient temp and maintaining the coolant's minimum temp at exactly the system's ambient temp (and not lower!), may have a benefic effect. You just have to keep one eye on this balance...

  7. #17
    AntiMatter Guru ROG Array chrsplmr's Avatar
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    Dr. Z+ .... thankYou good sir.

  8. #18
    ROG Enthusiast Array
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    ROG PhD acquired !!! Dr Z , all hail the new doc in ROG

  9. #19
    ROG Enthusiast Array EvylCyn's Avatar
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    So here is a scenario/question. He is in Arizona, may/may not have AC but Ambient air temp is 90F. If in a closed room at initial ambient with a system running 24/7 wouldn't the ambient air temp slowly rise due to heat given off by the machine? Or is the efficiency of the cooling system 100% (This is assuming he is not using a TEC or putting the rad in a cooler environment)
    I ask this because I'm freezing my butt off at 70F (think long underwear/jeans/hoodie) and comfortable at 90F with decently high humidity. The "So, you have an A/C and your room temps still vary in that big range (even getting 90)?! I'm telling you, humans were not designed for higher room temps than 76-78... Anything above it is considered heavy physical work... even if you're just sleeping at that temps..." comment cracked me up LOL!!! To each their own...
    I'm new to cooling so feel free to correct/school me if need be

  10. #20
    ROG Guru: Yellow Belt Array
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    i have ac and the outdoor temp is up to 130degrees Fahrenheit my ac i can onl bring it to like 75 ambient without killing the ac bill hey if i run my whole A/C duct through the computer will that work witout producing conensation?i dunno i may have to downgrade to a 3770k system if the cooling gets expensive
    i dunno i need to build a reasonably priced system

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