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  1. #11
    TeamROG Moderator Array xeromist PC Specs
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    The good news is that LN2 has such a low boiling point that it will literally boil upon contact with skin and the boiling gas will create a protective barrier that keeps the liquid off the skin. Now, immersion or other prolonged contact(such as a soaked glove) _will_ cause damage. That's why you don't see benchers with gloves...safer without them.

    Sorry to derail but since we're on the subject of LN2 safety I thought it was worth mentioning.
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  2. #12
    New ROGer Array Zygomorphic's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by xeromist View Post
    The good news is that LN2 has such a low boiling point that it will literally boil upon contact with skin and the boiling gas will create a protective barrier that keeps the liquid off the skin. Now, immersion or other prolonged contact(such as a soaked glove) _will_ cause damage. That's why you don't see benchers with gloves...safer without them.

    Sorry to derail but since we're on the subject of LN2 safety I thought it was worth mentioning.
    Absolutely true, I was simply having a little fun . Newton's Law of Cooling is a differential equation, which means that the rate of temperature change is proportional to the absolute difference between the two objects. Hence liquid nitrogen is so cold (and thus delta T is high) that it's rate of warmth is large and thus boils instantaneously. I have seen the benchmarkers--on here!--pour LN2 on their bare hands and it rolls off. The key is to pour only a thin stream, so the LN2 boils on contact and the rest rides on the gas layer.

  3. #13
    ROG Doctor Array pcorreiamd's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Zygomorphic View Post
    The other doctor is @DocNRock, a new overclocker, except he is doing desktops. You can find him in General Discussion sections. Oh, and thanks for the cold burn advice, just one thing, a lot of USA guys don't know SI units, so here is the temperature: 102-108 Fahrenheit. Thank you again, I just thought I would convert it for the USA people who aren't as comfortable with Celsius. Its something about the system you grow up with, I understand, that determines not how you work problems, but how you think.
    Thanks. I edited the post. In case somebody searches the forum instead of calling an ambulance it should be easy enough to follow . Yeah we use SI units and I studied in an International School so my base is English literature mostly based out of the UK and the US but the editions in Europe all come with SI units. I know US is very proud of its units like the brits are very proud of driving on the left side but for me people should just come to an understanding and decide on one unit . I am going to teach Portuguese in a Summer University in Czech Republic but when I return to Portugal I definitely will OC this brick of laptop. Cheers

  4. #14
    ROG Doctor Array pcorreiamd's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by xeromist View Post
    The good news is that LN2 has such a low boiling point that it will literally boil upon contact with skin and the boiling gas will create a protective barrier that keeps the liquid off the skin. Now, immersion or other prolonged contact(such as a soaked glove) _will_ cause damage. That's why you don't see benchers with gloves...safer without them.

    Sorry to derail but since we're on the subject of LN2 safety I thought it was worth mentioning.
    Well since we are going into detail :P. Lets make a few points:

    1- The Nitrogen is more likely to blow due to its pressure in the cooler than leak on your hand (thus making a frostbite, a cold burn). The worst scenario is that the person handling it will have an explosion in their hands (this is the part I thought best to omit because its very rare ) losing some fingers or even the hand, but It doesn't matter how bad it looks the treatment is always the same: protect the rest of the hands and rewarm the frozen parts before they lose the chance to repair themselves, just like I described before.

    2- When exposed to room temp and pressure liquid Nitrogen will become a gas (but that is only good if the cooler doesn't blow and decides to leak slowly and of course if you are smart enough not to touch it). If it leaks with pressure some splashing will occur. You are right about the protective layer but this is good news for your muscles not your skin, it means that the part which hurt you first protects you from further damage. You will still have a frostbite. In case the contact is only with the vapors (like in the movies) there will be no injury .

    3- Gloves (Cryo gloves) are debatable. We use them to take samples from the big Nitrogen tanks but we don't when we need to work in microscopes because it makes handling impossible and can cause more accidents. If you use gloves make sure its the Cryo type and not your typical skiing gloves . My recommendation is use them if you need to replace a broken unit but not when you are working around the cooling system.

    I hope nobody is scared now. These are very rare accidents nowadays and you shouldn't be worried even if you are a noob like me. Just remember: its not good policy for computer manufacturers to blow their customers, and enjoy
    Last edited by pcorreiamd; 06-14-2012 at 05:51 AM.

  5. #15
    TeamROG Moderator Array xeromist PC Specs
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    All of the coolers used in overclocking as well as the duers and other transfer vessels are open containers. The only time it is sealed or under pressure is the original tank, which should be pressure safe. That's good advice though because a thermos makes a good pouring container and I could see an inexperienced person being tempted to cap it.
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