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  1. #61
    ROG Enthusiast Array Kinesis22's Avatar
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    I built my computer yesterday! All I need to do is instal the os and eventually get an ssd, I haven't gotten one yet because I'm still trying to figure out which one to buy. On the Fusion Thermo, if I'm not doing watercooling, should I remove the rubber protectors? And should the board be set to slow mode ON? It says in the manual that it's default position is OFF but mine was in ON. Should I switch it to OFF?
    ~Kinesis22

    ..................................................

    "Since there's only one of me shouldn't my opinion be doubled?"
    "Is it possible to play that game in your sleep?" "Oh definitely, I think better in my sleep."

  2. #62
    ROG Guru: Yellow Belt Array
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    Doh, never mind. :-)

  3. #63
    ROG Guru: White Belt Array
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    Pretty sure slow mode is only for ln2 (below -10deg) cooling. You should have it off

  4. #64
    ROG Guru: White Belt Array
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    If your rich you could always buy one of these ssd. The benchmarks look awesome but if you read it you will get an idea of performance of some other ssd

    http://www.tweaktown.com/articles/49...iew/index.html


    On another note.. This is post number 5. Yay I no longer have to do the captcha thing.

  5. #65
    ROG Enthusiast Array Kinesis22's Avatar
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    Yeah I turned it off, does anyone use Ubuntu 12.04? I got minecraft to run now but I have absolutely no sound and I can't figure out how to fix it, I have already updated the lwjgl and installed VLC media player after reading that it fixed it for someone else, still no sound. Any ideas?
    ~Kinesis22

    ..................................................

    "Since there's only one of me shouldn't my opinion be doubled?"
    "Is it possible to play that game in your sleep?" "Oh definitely, I think better in my sleep."

  6. #66
    ROG Enthusiast Array Razorbak86's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Black4 View Post
    Corsair has a PSU finder, to help size your PSU: http://www.corsair.com/learn_n_explore/?psu=yes

    You won't need more than a 650 Watt PSU even with twin video cards, and even the most powerful items are more power efficient. Go with a 750 Watt if you want to be conservative.
    Actually, you can easily go over 650-750W in a dual-GPU configuration. That Corsair power supply finder is fairly simplistic. Personally, I prefer the Power Supply Wattage Calculator right here on the Asus website.

    http://support.asus.com/powersupply.aspx

    Try using the Asus calculator for the following high-end "gaming" configuration.

    Inputs
    Motherboard: Desktop
    CPU: Intel, Intel Core i5, Core i5-2500K (x1)
    VGA Card: Nvidia, GeForce GTX 680 (x2)
    Memory Module: DDR3 (x4)
    Storage Devices: HDD (x2) + DVD/CD-RW (x1)
    USB: USB device (x4)
    PCI: Modem, Network (LAN), Audio, and other PCI card (x1)
    Fan: CPU or Chassis or Power Fan (x4)

    Output
    "Your Recommended Minimum Power Supply is 1000 Watts."

    Now, admittedly, this type of calculation is always conservative. In a real world setting, you'll never have all of these components maxed out at once. Nevertheless, you always need a little headroom in any system configuration, and the above inputs don't even account for overclocking. Furthermore, graphics cards typically have the largest power draw in most gaming configurations, and that component choice can often make or break the PSU wattage calculation. For example, if you substitute two power-hungry 480s or 580s for the two relatively efficient 680s I listed above, the total wattage calculation goes up to 1050 Watts. And if go with an "uber-high-end" gaming configuration, with two GTX 690s running in quad-SLI, the calculation jumps to 1400 Watts.

    Granted, that last configuration is an extreme example, but I used it to illustrate my point. That's why I recommend using a wattage calculator and running specific scenarios which allow for future upgrades or expansions down the road, when trying to size a PSU for a specific system configuration.

    Just my two cents.

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