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  1. #11
    ROG Guru: Brown Belt Array HalloweenWeed's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by xeromist View Post
    I used to think that as well, but I started with a 1920x1080 and then found that I was able to easily add two more for surround because that resolution is plentiful. 1920x1200 is a dying breed and limiting yourself to that resolution will seriously reduce your choices. As we've discussed in other threads there are none or next to no 1920x1200 120hz screens either.
    Not in my opinion. Ppl were going widescreen, and widerscreen, bc they thought it was "cool"; really it was just "different" and seemed more "modern" to them. If you notice, there are several different movie widescreen formats, and only the tamer ones are really popular now. Movie directors loved them bc it was so much easier to get the shot without the boom mic showing! What's really cool about 1920x1200 vs 1080 is it leaves you room at the bottom for a control panel, for navigating the movie, engaging slow-mo, sound adjustments, etc. without putting them in front of what you are watching. Not to mention, 11% more pixels - you can't tell me 11% less pixels is better for gaming. And when doing office apps, there is no need for widescreen, you want all that vertical space you can get. Office apps are better at the old 4:3 ratio, and 16:10 is closer to that ratio than 16:9 (1600x1080). At 16:10 you can even put two documents side-by-side just fine. I think in the near future you will see more ppl buying 16:10 as they get more savvy. The problem is right now they really just haven't figured it out yet.

    What's more, the TN panels (a.k.a the "cheap" affordable ones) don't have good angle viewing, meaning with widescreen the colors are screwed at the edge viewing angles. And since the vast majority of ppl won't pony up for a better tech, they are now experiencing the color distortion on the sides of their large 16:9 widescreen panels. A number of them are going to realize that the wide(st) format isn't so great after all. But of course if they had an IPS like I do they would see it fine - and like I said those are a minority. And for those who have 1900x1080 and think that it is best, try 1900x1200, you'll never want to go back. That's my argument.
    Last edited by HalloweenWeed; 02-08-2013 at 09:55 PM. Reason: Added: "And for those who have 1900x1080..."
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  2. #12
    TeamROG Moderator Array xeromist PC Specs
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    I agree that more real estate is generally better but you only need to look at the market to see that 16:10 has been and is on its way out. It would take a major shift in consumer preference to bring that back and I just don't see it happening.

    At any rate, the rage right now is 1920x1080. If you want the best selection of displays for a current purchase then that's what you go with.
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  3. #13
    ROG Enthusiast Array New2Mod's Avatar
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    I have the ASUS VG248QE and no complaints. So far it has taken what I have thrown at it and asked for more.

    Just my 2cents

  4. #14
    ROG Guru: Brown Belt Array HalloweenWeed's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by xeromist View Post
    I agree that more real estate is generally better but you only need to look at the market to see that 16:10 has been and is on its way out. It would take a major shift in consumer preference to bring that back and I just don't see it happening.

    At any rate, the rage right now is 1920x1080. If you want the best selection of displays for a current purchase then that's what you go with.
    Noooo, they will never take my 16:10 from me, they will have to pry it from my cold dead hands!
    i7-3930K; Asus RIVE; G.SKILL Ripjaws Z 4x4GB DDR3 1866; MSI 7870 2GD5/OC; Crucial M4 SSD 256GB;
    Corsair 1000HX; Corsair H100, 4x Excalibur 120mm PWM CPU Fan p-p, AS5; SB X-Fi Titanium Fata1ity Pro;
    Dell U2412m IPS 1920x1200; Cooler Master HAF 932 case; Tripp-Lite OMNIVS1500 UPS fully Line-interactive.
    (EVGA site: ) And I have a second (wife's) computer, Eve.

    Overclocking is useless to me if it is not rock stable.

  5. #15
    ROG Guru: Black Belt Array Area 66's Avatar
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    1920 x 1080 is popular because it's cheap. It's the manufacturers who push the 16:9 format. 1080 is useless for my VM and many other applications I use, i the extra lines a 1200 gives are priceless for me. It's not for nothing that many peoples put a second or third monitor in portrait mode instead of landscape.

  6. #16
    ASUS Reseller Array Shawnnepc's Avatar
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    I use 2 x VG278h. I love the monitors but am not really big on 3D anymore

    I'm thinking about replacing them for the upcoming 144Hz monitors or even the MX series
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  7. #17
    ROG Member Array a1ph4w01f91's Avatar
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    I got the Asus VS238. I love it except that I can't get it to fill the screen. I have my HDMI cable put it butit wont go full screen. Any suggestions?
    MyRig: CrosshairV Formula-Z MOBO | AMD FX-8350 Vishera 4.0GHz | ASUS HD7870| G.SKILL RipjawsX Series 8GB 1600 | NZXT HALE90-750-M 750W | SAMSUNG 840 Series 120GB SSD | WD Blk WD 1TB 7200RPM 64MB Cache HDD |NZXT Guardian921RB Mid.

  8. #18
    ROG Member Array a1ph4w01f91's Avatar
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    Nevermind guys! Overscaling in the AMD Engine Control fixed it.
    MyRig: CrosshairV Formula-Z MOBO | AMD FX-8350 Vishera 4.0GHz | ASUS HD7870| G.SKILL RipjawsX Series 8GB 1600 | NZXT HALE90-750-M 750W | SAMSUNG 840 Series 120GB SSD | WD Blk WD 1TB 7200RPM 64MB Cache HDD |NZXT Guardian921RB Mid.

  9. #19
    Twisted Silicon Array nleksan's Avatar
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    Hey all, first post here (but lurking for a while).

    I just wanted to offer my opinion/experiences based on the monitors I own and have owned...

    First things first; don't buy a monitor without first seeing it in person, if at all possible. If you live near a Micro Center, Fry's, or even a Best Buy, go in and take a look at the various displays they have up and running. I know with Micro Center, at least the one near me, they never have less than 40 different monitors up and running in the display section of the store, and they are ALL hooked up to computers so you can actually play with them instead of just watching a screen saver or staring at an empty Windows log-in screen.
    I have had some difficulties convincing employees to let me spend 10 hours going from screen to screen testing each with some of my display calibration equipment If the Monitor is connected to a PC with internet access, the quickest way to get a "feel" for the quality of the panel is to use the Lagom tests (just search Google). It'll show color banding, grey scale, dithering, etc.
    Also, remember that monitors, just like televisions, are setup very differently when on display in a store than they would be at home; over-boosted backlighting, ridiculous contrast, and intense over-saturation are not just typical, they're the norm. Use the monitors' OSD to set the picture mode to either "sRGB", "User", or "Custom Color", then drop brightness to somewhere between 50-75 and contrast around the same, maybe a bit higher. Make sure Sharpness isn't any higher than 50-60, although it's pretty easy to adjust (drop it to zero, then go up one bump at a time until the text is no longer blurry, but stop before you start getting the white outline around edges). Also, disable any "Dynamic" anything, brightness/contrast/etc. You don't want the monitor constantly changing how it looks, as it's not a very accurate representation of the monitor's capability and will just give you a headache.


    Anyway...
    With a price point of $500, you actually are in the "sweet spot" for having a TON of different options: size, panel type, resolution, aspect ratio, etc., they're almost all available.

    Personally, I vastly prefer to use WQHD IPS (AH-IPS to be specific) displays over 1080p TN 120/144hz panels. The immense increase in pixel count, pixel density (lower pixel pitch), very good color accuracy, they all make for a much more pleasant experience. Not to mention, 2560x1440p has a LOT more screen real-estate than 1920x1080p does; in fact, despite the significant resolution increase, I don't have THAT much of a decrease in performance in games, as I only ever need ~2xMSAA at the most when using 1440p, whereas with a 23-24" 1080p display I need 4-8xMSAA (I actually dislike 1080p on anything larger than 21.5/22" panels). The only game that I cannot average higher than 60fps with everything maxed out fully and with 2xMSAA (+/- FXAA) is Crysis 3. Borderlands 2, Far Cry 3, Metro 2033/LL, all run between 60 and 100 frames per second.
    IPS, however, does have a few shortcomings... There is the infamous "IPS Glow", which is somewhat more prevalent in the cheaper displays than in the higher-end WCG models from Dell, NEC, Eizo, et al, but I had both a U2713H and U3014 that both had significant "glow", thankfully Dell is awesome about exchanging panels and no-questions-asked I got them both replaced until I had perfect monitors. IPS Glow is a purple-y shimmer that is visible from off-angle viewing.
    They don't have the best blacks, frankly they aren't THAT much better than TN panels in that respect. Once calibrated, they are noticeably better, but unless you have an extra $300 or so for a Spyder4Elite or equivalent (some of the better ones I have cost 3-4x that!), you won't see a huge difference in black spaces. That said, while the blacks are still really just "really dark grey", the actual contrast in black areas tends to be much better than TN panels; playing a game like Metro, it's far easier to make out details in unlit areas, in fact after playing it on a TN and then an IPS, I literally saw a whole bunch of things that were invisible on the TN panel.

    Pixel response times, well, just don't bother with what the manufacturer says, because I have never seen one that is accurate. The "Professional" displays are by far the closest to being true, but they're still off by at least 10%, while the more mainstream or "gamer" panels are often 2-4x greater than advertised.

    If you can avoid it, don't get a display with any more inputs than you absolutely need. There is a strong correlation between the number of inputs and the amount of input latency. Some of the "Korean IPS" monitors are very popular for this reason, aside from their very low price; they have no built-in scalars, resulting in input lag that is only a couple ms greater than a CRT!

    You will see some displays advertised as using "PLS" panels, such as the Samsung S27B970D, Asus PA248Q/PB278Q, and some "Korean IPS" like the Qnix... This stands for "Plane Line Switching", which is Samsung's version of IPS ("In Plane Switching"), as currently all IPS panels are manufactured by LG.

    If you want a display with phenomenal contrast, and one that displays blacks so dark they look like an exploded ball point pen, and whites that can be as bright as a 100W bulb, then check out the A-MVA or cPVA panels. They have ridiculous contrast ratios, literally 2-3x what any IPS/PLS or TN can achieve, with color accuracy that is not quite as good as an 8bit IPS/PLS but much better than 6bit TN (all TN are 6bit + Dithering; all IPS/PLS are at least 8bit except eIPS, which CAN be 8bit but is almost always 6bit+FRC). The only downside is that, in order to compensate for it's somewhat slower pixel response time, many manufacturers have resorted to overdriving the panels. This in and of itself is not a bad thing, but most manufacturers over-do it... a LOT!
    The result is "Inverse Ghosting", in which you see blurring AHEAD of moving objects rather than trailing them. This phenomena can occur with IPS/PLS/TN panels as well, but percentage-wise is probably the most common with VA panels. The better ones allow you to reduce the overdrive to a nice balance, but others (some BenQ panels come to mind) are not only really bad, but have no option to reduce this overshoot.

    When done right, VA panels are in my opinion the most "beautiful" to look at. However, you really have to see them in person before deciding, as specs mean very little.

    Trying to buy a monitor without seeing it is like trying to figure out which switches on a mechanical keyboard would be best for you, without ever having used one and having no access to one. You can get a million different opinions and still be no closer to an answer, because it comes down to what YOU like.

    If I had to recommend some SPECIFIC panels, though, I can recommend the following with little to no hesitation:
    - Dell Ultrasharp specifically U2312HM (extremely low input lag; eIPS 6Bit+FRC panel, 1080p), U2412HM (eIPS 6bit+FRC, 1200p), U2713HM (AH-IPS 8bit 1440p); don't even look at the U2713H, U2413, or U3014 as the 10bit Wide-Gamut displays are NOT good for gaming, there are NO games that use the Adobe RGB spectrum, and spending a bunch of money on such a nice display only to use it in sRGB mode kinda defeats the purpose
    - Asus PB248Q (1200p PLS) or PB278Q (1440p PLS)
    - Qnix PLS 27" WQHD 1440p monitors ($330 or so on eBay; use overclockable PLS panels, with almost every single one capable of 96-144hz)
    - Dell's or LG's 29" 2560x1080p displays, which have a 21:9 aspect ratio and use AH-IPS panels (surprisingly very low input latency; great colors even with just a "by eye" calibration; very immersive and a better alternative to 3x 1080p panels IMHO; however, despite being very wide, they aren't very tall; very much personal preference, don't buy without seeing in person)

    Again, I am not big on the 120/144hz panels, as I don't like horrible color for slightly smoother panning, but others will disagree with me here. I can't tell you which is right or wrong, because neither is; it's just preference. People will say "120hz for gaming, IPS for not gaming", but I say "That's ridiculous". Unless you are already a true competitive gamer and MAKE MONEY doing so, a 120hz panel is NOT going to suddenly turn you into one. Sure, your K/D ratio may go up a few tenths of a percent, but is it worth having such terrible colors for everything else you do on your computer? For me, no. For others, apparently it is.

    Anyway, I hope that helps you some!

  10. #20
    ROG Guru: Grand Master Array HiVizMan's Avatar
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    Wow what a great first post. Repped you dude.
    To help us help you - please provide as much information about your system and the problem as possible.

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