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  1. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Myk SilentShadow View Post
    Any and all overclocking starts off the degradation process somewhat faster than when your CPU is at stock, but, it cannot be tracked, nor forecast how fast, or slow, your CPU will degrade. Just like the silicon lottery on having a good clocker with good high RAM clocks with a better than average IMC....the only time you'll know your CPU has degraded is when you need more volts to achieve the same OC you've had going for ages.
    hmm, in that case, would you say temperatures alone can degrade CPUs? if so, how?

    whether it took 2 years or 2 days, i've always thought current would be the main reason behind most dead chips that were overclocked (unless temperatures were extremely high 85C+ [for ivy bridge] for very long periods of time).
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  2. #12
    ROG Guru: Grand Master Array HiVizMan's Avatar
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    This is a popular misconception that temp is the only factor.

    Degredation starts the minute you power on any CPU. Overclocking will accelerate this. Now this is all relative. The degradation may take 5 or 10 years to be noticeable, or the same model CPU may have noticeable effect within three months. There is no hard and fast rule at all.

    Temperature is the byproduct of voltage, you need voltage to make your CPU work, the more you overclock the more voltage is needed for that CPU to work. Heat and voltage kill, not one or the other. It does not matter just how cold you make your CPU either, if you put way to much voltage through your CPU it will die. Voltage is the killer.

    For 96% of air and water overclockers there is little likelihood that in their normal lifetime of CPU usage they will have a CPU degrade on them. I would suggest that those folks that stress a CPU for days on end will most proberbly have accelerated wear and tear or if you prefer degradation.

    So really it is a much ado about nothing. Just be sensible and do not push 2.2 volts through your CPU while on a stock cooler.
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  3. #13
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    hehe sounds pretty good by me ^_^
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  4. #14
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    i had MVE running 5ghz 24/7 @ + 0.33V offset mode for almost a year with no whea errors or any other issue .
    that board died .
    on my replacement MVE board , i can no longer run at the same settings without geting whea errors from time to time .
    i played with all the voltages related to cpu + digi control , no help . only if i up the voltage to + 0.36 offset + llc at extreme (vcore goes as high as 1.6V) i can run on 5ghz without whea errors.

    note that i dont get those whea errors on regular basis. only if i run solidworks renders i get this .
    solidworks probably uses some different cpu commands then games or other software , and is very sensitive to whea.
    i also use other high cpu demand software like adobe premier/lightroom , and no whea errors with those
    Last edited by sstephan; 10-05-2013 at 07:09 PM.

  5. #15
    ROG Guru: Grand Master Array HiVizMan's Avatar
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    Solid works really stress memory too by the way.
    To help us help you - please provide as much information about your system and the problem as possible.

  6. #16
    Tech Marketing Manager HQ Array Raja@ASUS's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by defter View Post
    hmm, in that case, would you say temperatures alone can degrade CPUs? if so, how?

    whether it took 2 years or 2 days, i've always thought current would be the main reason behind most dead chips that were overclocked (unless temperatures were extremely high 85C+ [for ivy bridge] for very long periods of time).
    You are correct. What kills or degrades a processor rapidly is heavy loads at elevated voltages, where the current becomes excessive. This is exacerbated at higher operating frequencies as the current drawn is proportional to operating frequency - higher operating frequency needs elevated voltage which is the potential for current to flow.

    People are mistaken when they state only one or two of these contributors as the main factor. Voltage, current and temps can lead to degradation. However voltage and heat are not as significant as current.

    i) Consider a CPU running at stock settings on a stock cooler at full load. If heat alone were an issue, the CPU would degrade rapidly.

    ii) Consider an elevated voltage, and a light load. As the current being drawn is not high, we cannot say that voltage alone leads to or is the primary contributor to degradation. Even at high operating frequencies. Case in point for those that benchmark - we know that the "heavy load" benchmarks degrade a CPU faster than a light load benchmark. Why? Because more current is drawn.

    iii) Consider the fact that the stock VID on these CPUs is variable - yet they all meet Intel's TDP. The variance in current draw between a high VID CPU and a low VID CPU is within a couple of watts most of the time. Hence the warranty offered on a high VID CPU versus a low VID one is the same.

    The gap does widen as we increase the operating frequency as does the disparity in the level of voltage required between two such CPUs. Still, that change is not completely significant as quite often the CPUs will draw similar levels of current at a given frequency, regardless of how much voltage each of them needs to be stable (maybe 20W between the two samples at the kind of OCs we run on air and water).

    The rest of this relationship is down to variables that fall outside my scope of education though I know enough to understand the elementary. Either way, not something I want to try and fudge my way through wrongly on a forum like a muppet.


    We can say for certain that there is a relationship between required voltage and frequency - bearing in mind that the change is the amount of current that flows. Depending upon the temperature co-efficient of the substrate, heat can play a part in elevating the required current. I guess we need to understand that voltage is potential, while current is the name we give to flow of that potential. Also worth understanding that P=VA...

    Of course, you could brick a CPU on purpose if you wanted; running it out of spec by grossly abusing any three of these contributors. However, as we're talking about the way we use these CPUs while overclocking (applying required voltages) - it's current we need to fear most.

    -Raja

  7. #17
    ROG Guru: Brown Belt Array meankeys PC Specs
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    Raja - So with good sub ambit cooling what is the max voltage you would ever push through a i7 3770K with your CPLL set on high?
    I am trying to get to 5300 + MHz I tried up to 1.855v with good temps but no go. am I wasting my time with this chip. I would hate to see it go pop and ruin my socket (I am running RealBench)
    ty

  8. #18
    Tech Marketing Manager HQ Array Raja@ASUS's Avatar
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    If it's not doing 5300 at the high voltages you have tried, you are indeed wasting your time.

  9. #19
    ROG Guru: Brown Belt Array meankeys PC Specs
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    Thank you Raja
    what is the highest voltage you have ever heard someone pushing through these processors? Like I hear these world records 7 GHz on LN2
    just curious.
    ty

  10. #20
    Tech Marketing Manager HQ Array Raja@ASUS's Avatar
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    Over 2V - but CPUs that can take that are rare. Bear in mind that was mainly validations as well, NOT realbench. Would imagine, you'll get degradation pretty damn fast at high voltages with that kind of load.

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