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  1. #11
    ROG Guru: Platinum Belt Array hmscott PC Specs
    hmscott PC Specs
    Laptop (Model)Asus G750JH-DB71 (legacy)
    MotherboardAsus G750JH Intel HM87
    ProcessorIntel i7-4700HQ XTU Cores 36x/35x/34x/34x Cache 36x -50mV undervolt
    Memory (part number)Hyundai Electronics HMT41GS6AFR8A-PB 1.35v DDR3L-1600MHz
    Graphics Card #1Nvidia 780m Asus GPU Tweak OC 932mhz/6300mhz
    Sound CardRealtek v6.0.1.7469 driver
    MonitorAUO B173HW02 V1 Custom Refresh 85hz
    Storage #1RAID0 2x M.2 SATA Crucial MX200 512GB CT500MX200SSD6
    Storage #2Crucial 512GB 2.5" MX200 CT500MX200SSD1
    Power Supply230w AC Power Adapter 19.5v
    Keyboard Logitech k400 Wireless KB/Trackpad
    Headset Sony MDR-XB500 Wired and Sennheiser RS-220 Wireless TOSLINK
    OS Windows 8.1 + 8 Linux VM's + Windows 10 Technical Preview
    Network RouterAsus RT-AC68U DLINK DIR-655

    Join Date
    Jun 2013
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    Guys, I just wanted to point out that if you use a 16GB Flash drive, Asus Backtracker will fill up 12+GB on it. IDK why 8GB Flash drive works, I've done that too, but thought I should mention that a 16GB is preferred.

    Also, if you use a 32GB Flash drive, Asus Backtracker only makes a 20GB partition on it, and also uses 12+GB. If you want some free space to store your favorite build stuff the 32GB works too.

    And, get a fast USB 3.0 flash drive, even though it is going to sit there waiting for use, it really makes a big time difference creating the image on the flash drive and restoring from it - I tried a USB 2.0 drive once and it took forever to create and restore.

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by hmscott View Post
    Guys, I just wanted to point out that if you use a 16GB Flash drive, Asus Backtracker will fill up 12+GB on it. IDK why 8GB Flash drive works, I've done that too, but thought I should mention that a 16GB is preferred.

    Also, if you use a 32GB Flash drive, Asus Backtracker only makes a 20GB partition on it, and also uses 12+GB. If you want some free space to store your favorite build stuff the 32GB works too.

    And, get a fast USB 3.0 flash drive, even though it is going to sit there waiting for use, it really makes a big time difference creating the image on the flash drive and restoring from it - I tried a USB 2.0 drive once and it took forever to create and restore.
    Hey hmscott!

    Well, here I am over on this thread regarding installing my new Samsung 840 EVO 250GB SSD.

    I must admit I'm a bit daunted on this whole process for a few reasons.

    First let me say as to your above advice, I did buy a 16GB Kingston flash drive along with everything else in anticipation of all of this, but it is a USB 2.0. Wish I had the USB 3.0, but this is what I have unless I return this and get the 3.0. Question is, is it worth the time to return or do I just "deal" with the extra time spent doing this?

    The bigger concerns are (based on my post here) getting the backup right and imaging over to the new SSD, but ALSO coming into play is my OLD LAPTOP and the data that I REALLY want from that transferred over to the NEW drives.

    I have an old Gateway 160GB HDD running WinXP SP3 32-bit system with 113GB data on it that I really want on my new system as it contains EVERYTHING that I've been using and working on for over a decade now!

    I have a 2 TB WD Passport 3.0 USB backup drive that I bought once again specifically to do all of this but am confused as to order of this process, and any limitations, if any, I may incur in the process. And just how to optimally do all of this...

    1. Image my new 750GB HDD with Win 8 over to the new 250GB SSD
    2. Once new SSD properly boots formatting the HDD.
    3. Get the data from my old Win XP 160GB HDD with 113GB data over to my new G750 JX's SSD and HDD and just how to optimally do this.

    ie. Transfer the data from the WinXP HDD over to the backup drive, and then transfer the data over to the new drive from that using synchronization software? Will that even work? etc...

    I know this is a lot to be asking and I don't expect you or anyone else to give me a degree in computer science here, LOL, but just kinda pointing me in the right direction with a healthy guideline of just what to do in my scenario would be ENORMOUSLY helpful!

    You've already been a big help to me in the RAM thread (working on getting those screenshots up "over there" too btw. and I do have some tech. experience, but it's been a long time since I took on anything quite like this and frankly haven't been too comfortable with my new Asus yet because I've yet to even really start, much less complete, what has become a daunting task in my mind to this point.

    I have been rigorously watching YT vids, reading articles, etc...just need the proper start.

    Have been looking at and downloaded the USB portable version of mucommander for example for data transfer as recommended by "Eli The Computer Guy" on YT. Opened it and it appears to be easy enough to use with the proper familiarity and purpose.

    I am determined to get this all correct and be ENJOYING the fruits of my labors!

    I realize this has become a lengthy post and concern.

    Having said this, any and all guidance you can further show to me is GREATLY appreciated, once more hmscott.

    Thanks for your time and patience with all of my questions.
    Last edited by SupaFaztG; 06-01-2014 at 07:00 PM.

  3. #13
    ROG Guru: Platinum Belt Array hmscott PC Specs
    hmscott PC Specs
    Laptop (Model)Asus G750JH-DB71 (legacy)
    MotherboardAsus G750JH Intel HM87
    ProcessorIntel i7-4700HQ XTU Cores 36x/35x/34x/34x Cache 36x -50mV undervolt
    Memory (part number)Hyundai Electronics HMT41GS6AFR8A-PB 1.35v DDR3L-1600MHz
    Graphics Card #1Nvidia 780m Asus GPU Tweak OC 932mhz/6300mhz
    Sound CardRealtek v6.0.1.7469 driver
    MonitorAUO B173HW02 V1 Custom Refresh 85hz
    Storage #1RAID0 2x M.2 SATA Crucial MX200 512GB CT500MX200SSD6
    Storage #2Crucial 512GB 2.5" MX200 CT500MX200SSD1
    Power Supply230w AC Power Adapter 19.5v
    Keyboard Logitech k400 Wireless KB/Trackpad
    Headset Sony MDR-XB500 Wired and Sennheiser RS-220 Wireless TOSLINK
    OS Windows 8.1 + 8 Linux VM's + Windows 10 Technical Preview
    Network RouterAsus RT-AC68U DLINK DIR-655

    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Reputation
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    Quote Originally Posted by SupaFaztG View Post
    Hey hmscott!

    Well, here I am over on this thread regarding installing my new Samsung 840 EVO 250GB SSD.

    I must admit I'm a bit daunted on this whole process for a few reasons.

    First let me say as to your above advice, I did buy a 16GB Kingston flash drive along with everything else in anticipation of all of this, but it is a USB 2.0. Wish I had the USB 3.0, but this is what I have unless I return this and get the 3.0. Question is, is it worth the time to return or do I just "deal" with the extra time spent doing this?

    The bigger concerns are (based on my post here) getting the backup right and imaging over to the new SSD, but ALSO coming into play is my OLD LAPTOP and the data that I REALLY want from that transferred over to the NEW drives.

    I have an old Gateway 160GB HDD running WinXP SP3 32-bit system with 113GB data on it that I really want on my new system as it contains EVERYTHING that I've been using and working on for over a decade now!

    I have a 2 TB WD Passport 3.0 USB backup drive that I bought once again specifically to do all of this but am confused as to order of this process, and any limitations, if any, I may incur in the process. And just how to optimally do all of this...

    1. Image my new 750GB HDD with Win 8 over to the new 250GB SSD
    2. Once new SSD properly boots formatting the HDD.
    3. Get the data from my old Win XP 160GB HDD with 113GB data over to my new G750 JX's SSD and HDD and just how to optimally do this.

    ie. Transfer the data from the WinXP HDD over to the backup drive, and then transfer the data over to the new drive from that using synchronization software? Will that even work? etc...

    I know this is a lot to be asking and I don't expect you or anyone else to give me a degree in computer science here, LOL, but just kinda pointing me in the right direction with a healthy guideline of just what to do in my scenario would be ENORMOUSLY helpful!

    You've already been a big help to me in the RAM thread (working on getting those screenshots up "over there" too btw. and I do have some tech. experience, but it's been a long time since I took on anything quite like this and frankly haven't been too comfortable with my new Asus yet because I've yet to even really start, much less complete, what has become a daunting task in my mind to this point.

    I have been rigorously watching YT vids, reading articles, etc...just need the proper start.

    Have been looking at and downloaded the USB portable version of mucommander for example for data transfer as recommended by "Eli The Computer Guy" on YT. Opened it and it appears to be easy enough to use with the proper familiarity and purpose.

    I am determined to get this all correct and be ENJOYING the fruits of my labors!

    I realize this has become a lengthy post and concern.

    Having said this, any and all guidance you can further show to me is GREATLY appreciated, once more hmscott.

    Thanks for your time and patience with all of my questions.
    SupaFaztG, first of all, relax, it is as easy as the 7 Steps reka121402 listed, with a couple of exceptions. The 8GB => 16GB => 32GB size of the flash drive I already mentioned.

    The other differences are that you don't want to do Step 6/7 - the OS on the original drive is good to preserve and keep - you don't gain a lot of disk space by blowing it away. Think of it like the media box that holds your original System Recovery DVD's, because it is

    When you back up the recovery partition using Asus Backtracker, it isn't a 100% certainty that you won't need the original media that came with the laptop someday.

    Years later when you are digging through the garage looking for the installation DVD's... the original HD are those DVD's. Even if you just image the disk with the recovery partition - that data needs to be somewhere - along with the activated program that can restore that image to something you can use. All needless complication - just keep the original disk intact, so you can put it back in Bay1 and boot from it.

    You can use the original HD DATA partition if you need some free space, stick the HD in a USB 3.0 enclosure, then you can use it at high speed just as if it is in the laptop, and when you go mobile with the laptop the original HD is sitting at home safe from droppage and lossage.

    Keep the Asus Backtracker Flash drive, with a copy of the Asus Backtracker software you used to make it on it, as an Archive too. That way you have 2 chances of recovery. Flash drives and disk drives die over time, but hopefully one will outlast the other.

    Step 3 is a bit off; you want to put the new SSD in the same Bay1 location that held the original HDD. It will work the other way, but if you ever want to put the HD back in, you don't want it in the original boot position of Bay1, you want it in Bay2 - it is bad enough having 2 bootable OS drives in the computer, but putting it back in it's original boot position is asking for the computer to boot from it again.

    Too bad you got the USB 2.0 drive, but at least you can have the joy of learning to knit, garden, or the intricacies of small engine repair - which you will have time to do while waiting for the Asus Backtracker flash drive creation and subsequent Recovery Restore to your new SSD

    I did it myself, I didn't want to wait to get a USB 3.0 flash drive - all mine were in use / too large to dedicate to a permanent Recovery Archive Flash drive, so my first attempt was with a USB 2.0 drive... the good news is when I did get a USB 3.0 drive the SSD had a Recovery Partition I could use to make another Asus Backtracker Backup - I kept those partitions around until I could make a USB 3.0 flash backup.

    Between Step 4/5, you likely want to tap ESC continually until you get the boot menu so you can select the USB Flash drive as the boot device. You shouldn't need to do it, as the G750 will fail to boot on the blank SSD, and it will find the USB drive - but not all motherboards will do that, so it is good to get into the habit of maintaining positive control over the boot process and select it manually.

    Back to an earlier post, yes the kit SSD is the same drive as the standlone SSD, the transfer / mounting parts are the only difference.

    There are migration programs that will attempt to put things in the right place from one OS version to another, and I have used the Microsoft Migration software in the past, and it worked fine; it got me up and running quickly on a work laptop, but for my own use I hooked up my old drive(s) in USB enclosures - or a handy adapter like you got with your SSD kit, and copied my personal data (and OS hidden preference files) over by hand. I reinstalled all my original software from scratch - and found many had updated versions for the new OS - which I wouldn't necessarily have known with the migration software.

    You might want to take a few minutes to accept the fact that you might do all of this a few times - the first time might not go as expected, as your expectations might not have taken into account everything as it really resolves.

    If you want to try some migration software, then go for it, that is how we learn - by trying things - and it is just as easy to restore a 2nd, 3rd, 4th time to the SSD as it was the 1st.

    Again, that is why I suggest a high speed USB 3.0 flash drive - the faster it is the less you will sink into a funk realizing you need to do another restore to get things right - you will take the road leading to complete success instead of a partial "I can live with it" compromise knowing it is going to go faster than slower.

    On the old system I took screen shots of the folder contents as needed, like Programs, so I had a list of what to reinstall. I also took a screen shot of Programs and Features pages so I knew what I had installed. I also made notes of what I did right and wrong on the old system, so I would do better on the next. Other things will occur to you over time, time you get if you..

    If you can keep the old system going for a while, and work from a cloned copy of the drive(s) onto a USB connected drive on your new system that is best. Even a week or two later you will remember something you forgot to get from the old system, and it is nice if the old system is still easily accessible to get that stuff.

    Even fancier would be to clone the drive into a VM image that you could boot on under Windows 8.1 hosted VMware / Virtualbox - but I sense that right now that would be asking a bit much of your comfort zone

    Maybe keep the original system / drives intact for now, if you think you can work up to turning them into a bootable VM in the future.

    Here is a brief article to get you started, google questions / terms from there, there are a lot of variations on how to do this posted online:
    http://www.pcworld.com/article/21399...l-machine.html

    That's all for now
    Last edited by hmscott; 06-02-2014 at 01:23 AM.

  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by hmscott View Post
    SupaFaztG, first of all, relax, it is as easy as the 7 Steps reka121402 listed, with a couple of exceptions. The 8GB => 16GB => 32GB size of the flash drive I already mentioned.

    The other differences are that you don't want to do Step 6/7 - the OS on the original drive is good to preserve and keep - you don't gain a lot of disk space by blowing it away. Think of it like the media box that holds your original System Recovery DVD's, because it is

    When you back up the recovery partition using Asus Backtracker, it isn't a 100% certainty that you won't need the original media that came with the laptop someday.

    Years later when you are digging through the garage looking for the installation DVD's... the original HD are those DVD's. Even if you just image the disk with the recovery partition - that data needs to be somewhere - along with the activated program that can restore that image to something you can use. All needless complication - just keep the original disk intact, so you can put it back in Bay1 and boot from it.

    You can use the original HD DATA partition if you need some free space, stick the HD in a USB 3.0 enclosure, then you can use it at high speed just as if it is in the laptop, and when you go mobile with the laptop the original HD is sitting at home safe from droppage and lossage.

    Keep the Asus Backtracker Flash drive, with a copy of the Asus Backtracker software you used to make it on it, as an Archive too. That way you have 2 chances of recovery. Flash drives and disk drives die over time, but hopefully one will outlast the other.

    Step 3 is a bit off; you want to put the new SSD in the same Bay1 location that held the original HDD. It will work the other way, but if you ever want to put the HD back in, you don't want it in the original boot position of Bay1, you want it in Bay2 - it is bad enough having 2 bootable OS drives in the computer, but putting it back in it's original boot position is asking for the computer to boot from it again.

    Too bad you got the USB 2.0 drive, but at least you can have the joy of learning to knit, garden, or the intricacies of small engine repair - which you will have time to do while waiting for the Asus Backtracker flash drive creation and subsequent Recovery Restore to your new SSD

    I did it myself, I didn't want to wait to get a USB 3.0 flash drive - all mine were in use / too large to dedicate to a permanent Recovery Archive Flash drive, so my first attempt was with a USB 2.0 drive... the good news is when I did get a USB 3.0 drive the SSD had a Recovery Partition I could use to make another Asus Backtracker Backup - I kept those partitions around until I could make a USB 3.0 flash backup.

    Between Step 4/5, you likely want to tap ESC continually until you get the boot menu so you can select the USB Flash drive as the boot device. You shouldn't need to do it, as the G750 will fail to boot on the blank SSD, and it will find the USB drive - but not all motherboards will do that, so it is good to get into the habit of maintaining positive control over the boot process and select it manually.

    Back to an earlier post, yes the kit SSD is the same drive as the standlone SSD, the transfer / mounting parts are the only difference.

    There are migration programs that will attempt to put things in the right place from one OS version to another, and I have used the Microsoft Migration software in the past, and it worked fine; it got me up and running quickly on a work laptop, but for my own use I hooked up my old drive(s) in USB enclosures - or a handy adapter like you got with your SSD kit, and copied my personal data (and OS hidden preference files) over by hand. I reinstalled all my original software from scratch - and found many had updated versions for the new OS - which I wouldn't necessarily have known with the migration software.

    You might want to take a few minutes to accept the fact that you might do all of this a few times - the first time might not go as expected, as your expectations might not have taken into account everything as it really resolves.

    If you want to try some migration software, then go for it, that is how we learn - by trying things - and it is just as easy to restore a 2nd, 3rd, 4th time to the SSD as it was the 1st.

    Again, that is why I suggest a high speed USB 3.0 flash drive - the faster it is the less you will sink into a funk realizing you need to do another restore to get things right - you will take the road leading to complete success instead of a partial "I can live with it" compromise knowing it is going to go faster than slower.

    On the old system I took screen shots of the folder contents as needed, like Programs, so I had a list of what to reinstall. I also took a screen shot of Programs and Features pages so I knew what I had installed. I also made notes of what I did right and wrong on the old system, so I would do better on the next. Other things will occur to you over time, time you get if you..

    If you can keep the old system going for a while, and work from a cloned copy of the drive(s) onto a USB connected drive on your new system that is best. Even a week or two later you will remember something you forgot to get from the old system, and it is nice if the old system is still easily accessible to get that stuff.

    Even fancier would be to clone the drive into a VM image that you could boot on under Windows 8.1 hosted VMware / Virtualbox - but I sense that right now that would be asking a bit much of your comfort zone

    Maybe keep the original system / drives intact for now, if you think you can work up to turning them into a bootable VM in the future.

    Here is a brief article to get you started, google questions / terms from there, there are a lot of variations on how to do this posted online:
    http://www.pcworld.com/article/21399...l-machine.html

    That's all for now
    Hello hmscott,

    "....breathe....breathe...." LOL

    Yes, I guess I'm letting my perfectionist ways get to me. The fact is, and as you pointed out, I need to resign myself to SOME of this process not going as expected, by my own hand.

    My intention is to keep both drives in the laptop when complete having the SSD as the new boot drive and for all of my apps, etc...as this IS the purpose of an SSD in the first place. I guess keeping the second HDD "as is" isn't a bad idea either, as you state.

    Is there any reason I can't just keep the HDD in the system? Just swap the bays out once the SSD is imaged?

    I'll keep my questions and comments to a minimum because quite frankly I'm going to need time to go through your reply and really let it all sink in, wrap my head around all of it, read the VM article, and then move forward.

    I AM going to get a USB 3.0 flash drive for this too btw as I have no inclinations of learning to knit, garden, but MAYBE small engine repair. LOL

    I found this...

    http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00...=ATVPDKIKX0DER

    Apparently there are differences in read/write speeds in the USB 3.0 world too! This is a "step up" with Kingston's USB 3.0 at 70MB/s read and 30 MB/s write.

    There is also this one...

    http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00...A1YAK8U7QV5H1E

    ...which says Read 70 MByte/s, Write 20 MByte/s on the top and a contradictory Read 90 MByte/s, Write 20 MByte/s on the bottom.
    *sigh*

    Do you have a recommended drive for this particular task?

    Anyway, you have once again given me a plethora of information and guidance and I believe it's time to start putting it to proper use.

    I will surely post my hoped for triumph when complete!

    You have my disposition understood to a fault! LOL

    I thank you for your many words of advice and encouragement and I WILL persevere!

  5. #15
    ROG Guru: Platinum Belt Array hmscott PC Specs
    hmscott PC Specs
    Laptop (Model)Asus G750JH-DB71 (legacy)
    MotherboardAsus G750JH Intel HM87
    ProcessorIntel i7-4700HQ XTU Cores 36x/35x/34x/34x Cache 36x -50mV undervolt
    Memory (part number)Hyundai Electronics HMT41GS6AFR8A-PB 1.35v DDR3L-1600MHz
    Graphics Card #1Nvidia 780m Asus GPU Tweak OC 932mhz/6300mhz
    Sound CardRealtek v6.0.1.7469 driver
    MonitorAUO B173HW02 V1 Custom Refresh 85hz
    Storage #1RAID0 2x M.2 SATA Crucial MX200 512GB CT500MX200SSD6
    Storage #2Crucial 512GB 2.5" MX200 CT500MX200SSD1
    Power Supply230w AC Power Adapter 19.5v
    Keyboard Logitech k400 Wireless KB/Trackpad
    Headset Sony MDR-XB500 Wired and Sennheiser RS-220 Wireless TOSLINK
    OS Windows 8.1 + 8 Linux VM's + Windows 10 Technical Preview
    Network RouterAsus RT-AC68U DLINK DIR-655

    Join Date
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    Quote Originally Posted by SupaFaztG View Post
    Hello hmscott,

    "....breathe....breathe...." LOL

    Yes, I guess I'm letting my perfectionist ways get to me. The fact is, and as you pointed out, I need to resign myself to SOME of this process not going as expected, by my own hand.

    My intention is to keep both drives in the laptop when complete having the SSD as the new boot drive and for all of my apps, etc...as this IS the purpose of an SSD in the first place. I guess keeping the second HDD "as is" isn't a bad idea either, as you state.

    Is there any reason I can't just keep the HDD in the system? Just swap the bays out once the SSD is imaged?

    I'll keep my questions and comments to a minimum because quite frankly I'm going to need time to go through your reply and really let it all sink in, wrap my head around all of it, read the VM article, and then move forward.

    I AM going to get a USB 3.0 flash drive for this too btw as I have no inclinations of learning to knit, garden, but MAYBE small engine repair. LOL

    I found this...

    http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00...=ATVPDKIKX0DER

    Apparently there are differences in read/write speeds in the USB 3.0 world too! This is a "step up" with Kingston's USB 3.0 at 70MB/s read and 30 MB/s write.

    There is also this one...

    http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00...A1YAK8U7QV5H1E

    ...which says Read 70 MByte/s, Write 20 MByte/s on the top and a contradictory Read 90 MByte/s, Write 20 MByte/s on the bottom.
    *sigh*

    Do you have a recommended drive for this particular task?

    Anyway, you have once again given me a plethora of information and guidance and I believe it's time to start putting it to proper use.

    I will surely post my hoped for triumph when complete!

    You have my disposition understood to a fault! LOL

    I thank you for your many words of advice and encouragement and I WILL persevere!
    SupaFaztG, it takes time, that is why I alerted you to the idea that maybe it will take a few times to get everything just so, but even so, it isn't tough to do it close enough the first time, so expect that. Usually you realize the improvements long after the install, and you will want to live on it for a while to collect a list of improvements for the next time.

    The disk puts out lots of heat. When you feel the heat contained by the external enclosure, touching the case, you will know why it is a good idea to leave spinning drives out of the laptop.

    Those USB 3.0 drives are older and very slow in terms of USB 3.0 drives out today.

    One site lets you sort by read / write speed, which is helpful - write speed over 100MB/sec is what you are looking to get.

    Lexar makes reasonably priced, very fast USB 3.0 drives, the P10 16GB is $38.50 and read/write is 222/118
    http://usb.userbenchmark.com/Lexar-J...GB/Rating/1477
    http://www.amazon.com/Lexar-JumpDriv.../dp/B00CG5EF5I

    There are other choices and brands, sort by Write speed, size, and then choose by release date - get newer releases that are faster.

    http://usb.userbenchmark.com/
    Last edited by hmscott; 06-02-2014 at 02:19 PM.

  6. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by hmscott View Post
    SupaFaztG, it takes time, that is why I alerted you to the idea that maybe it will take a few times to get everything just so, but even so, it isn't tough to do it close enough the first time, so expect that. Usually you realize the improvements long after the install, and you will want to live on it for a while to collect a list of improvements for the next time.

    The disk puts out lots of heat. When you feel the heat contained by the external enclosure, touching the case, you will know why it is a good idea to leave spinning drives out of the laptop.

    Those USB 3.0 drives are older and very slow in terms of USB 3.0 drives out today.

    One site lets you sort by read / write speed, which is helpful - write speed over 100MB/sec is what you are looking to get.

    Lexar makes reasonably priced, very fast USB 3.0 drives, the P10 16GB is $38.50 and read/write is 222/118
    http://usb.userbenchmark.com/Lexar-J...GB/Rating/1477
    http://www.amazon.com/Lexar-JumpDriv.../dp/B00CG5EF5I

    There are other choices and brands, sort by Write speed, size, and then choose by release date - get newer releases that are faster.

    http://usb.userbenchmark.com/
    Sounds great!

    All of your support has been very helpful and in building my knowledge and confidence.

    I will "give back" here to others as you do when I've experienced some successes and "pay it forward".

    I've literally saved all you've said, and with all of the links in a .doc for my reference.

    And I like the idea and reasoning behind the external enclosure.

    You've been great!

    Many thanks!

  7. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by hmscott View Post
    SupaFaztG, it takes time, that is why I alerted you to the idea that maybe it will take a few times to get everything just so, but even so, it isn't tough to do it close enough the first time, so expect that. Usually you realize the improvements long after the install, and you will want to live on it for a while to collect a list of improvements for the next time.

    The disk puts out lots of heat. When you feel the heat contained by the external enclosure, touching the case, you will know why it is a good idea to leave spinning drives out of the laptop.

    Those USB 3.0 drives are older and very slow in terms of USB 3.0 drives out today.

    One site lets you sort by read / write speed, which is helpful - write speed over 100MB/sec is what you are looking to get.

    Lexar makes reasonably priced, very fast USB 3.0 drives, the P10 16GB is $38.50 and read/write is 222/118
    http://usb.userbenchmark.com/Lexar-J...GB/Rating/1477
    http://www.amazon.com/Lexar-JumpDriv.../dp/B00CG5EF5I

    There are other choices and brands, sort by Write speed, size, and then choose by release date - get newer releases that are faster.

    http://usb.userbenchmark.com/
    Hey hmscott!

    Well, after going to Bestbuy and them not having anything decent regarding appropriate USB 3.0 thumbdrives I ended up buying this drive online last night for my Backtracker process and storage thereof...

    http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00...?ie=UTF8&psc=1

    For a grand total of $22.95 incl S&H seemed like a pretty good deal to me.

    I definitely jumped in with both feet in this whole process and more than a bit ambitious after buying my new Asus G750 JX-TB71 and wanting to upgrade everything right out of the gate, but I figure once its all finally complete I'll be glad I did.

    I'm taking the time to read and learn all I can in the interim and just being patient at this point until the flash drive gets here in a few days and I can finally move forward.

    P.S. Still working on that screenshot SPD snippet from CPU-Z regarding the RAM upgrade. I won't even go into why that's delayed but suffice to say I'll have that up shortly in the RAM thread and see where to go from there.

    Thanks!
    Last edited by SupaFaztG; 06-07-2014 at 01:43 PM.

  8. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by hmscott View Post
    SupaFaztG, first of all, relax, it is as easy as the 7 Steps reka121402 listed, with a couple of exceptions. The 8GB => 16GB => 32GB size of the flash drive I already mentioned.

    The other differences are that you don't want to do Step 6/7 - the OS on the original drive is good to preserve and keep - you don't gain a lot of disk space by blowing it away. Think of it like the media box that holds your original System Recovery DVD's, because it is

    When you back up the recovery partition using Asus Backtracker, it isn't a 100% certainty that you won't need the original media that came with the laptop someday.

    Years later when you are digging through the garage looking for the installation DVD's... the original HD are those DVD's. Even if you just image the disk with the recovery partition - that data needs to be somewhere - along with the activated program that can restore that image to something you can use. All needless complication - just keep the original disk intact, so you can put it back in Bay1 and boot from it.

    You can use the original HD DATA partition if you need some free space, stick the HD in a USB 3.0 enclosure, then you can use it at high speed just as if it is in the laptop, and when you go mobile with the laptop the original HD is sitting at home safe from droppage and lossage.

    Keep the Asus Backtracker Flash drive, with a copy of the Asus Backtracker software you used to make it on it, as an Archive too. That way you have 2 chances of recovery. Flash drives and disk drives die over time, but hopefully one will outlast the other.

    Step 3 is a bit off; you want to put the new SSD in the same Bay1 location that held the original HDD. It will work the other way, but if you ever want to put the HD back in, you don't want it in the original boot position of Bay1, you want it in Bay2 - it is bad enough having 2 bootable OS drives in the computer, but putting it back in it's original boot position is asking for the computer to boot from it again.

    Too bad you got the USB 2.0 drive, but at least you can have the joy of learning to knit, garden, or the intricacies of small engine repair - which you will have time to do while waiting for the Asus Backtracker flash drive creation and subsequent Recovery Restore to your new SSD

    I did it myself, I didn't want to wait to get a USB 3.0 flash drive - all mine were in use / too large to dedicate to a permanent Recovery Archive Flash drive, so my first attempt was with a USB 2.0 drive... the good news is when I did get a USB 3.0 drive the SSD had a Recovery Partition I could use to make another Asus Backtracker Backup - I kept those partitions around until I could make a USB 3.0 flash backup.

    Between Step 4/5, you likely want to tap ESC continually until you get the boot menu so you can select the USB Flash drive as the boot device. You shouldn't need to do it, as the G750 will fail to boot on the blank SSD, and it will find the USB drive - but not all motherboards will do that, so it is good to get into the habit of maintaining positive control over the boot process and select it manually.

    Back to an earlier post, yes the kit SSD is the same drive as the standlone SSD, the transfer / mounting parts are the only difference.

    There are migration programs that will attempt to put things in the right place from one OS version to another, and I have used the Microsoft Migration software in the past, and it worked fine; it got me up and running quickly on a work laptop, but for my own use I hooked up my old drive(s) in USB enclosures - or a handy adapter like you got with your SSD kit, and copied my personal data (and OS hidden preference files) over by hand. I reinstalled all my original software from scratch - and found many had updated versions for the new OS - which I wouldn't necessarily have known with the migration software.

    You might want to take a few minutes to accept the fact that you might do all of this a few times - the first time might not go as expected, as your expectations might not have taken into account everything as it really resolves.

    If you want to try some migration software, then go for it, that is how we learn - by trying things - and it is just as easy to restore a 2nd, 3rd, 4th time to the SSD as it was the 1st.

    Again, that is why I suggest a high speed USB 3.0 flash drive - the faster it is the less you will sink into a funk realizing you need to do another restore to get things right - you will take the road leading to complete success instead of a partial "I can live with it" compromise knowing it is going to go faster than slower.

    On the old system I took screen shots of the folder contents as needed, like Programs, so I had a list of what to reinstall. I also took a screen shot of Programs and Features pages so I knew what I had installed. I also made notes of what I did right and wrong on the old system, so I would do better on the next. Other things will occur to you over time, time you get if you..

    If you can keep the old system going for a while, and work from a cloned copy of the drive(s) onto a USB connected drive on your new system that is best. Even a week or two later you will remember something you forgot to get from the old system, and it is nice if the old system is still easily accessible to get that stuff.

    Even fancier would be to clone the drive into a VM image that you could boot on under Windows 8.1 hosted VMware / Virtualbox - but I sense that right now that would be asking a bit much of your comfort zone

    Maybe keep the original system / drives intact for now, if you think you can work up to turning them into a bootable VM in the future.

    Here is a brief article to get you started, google questions / terms from there, there are a lot of variations on how to do this posted online:
    http://www.pcworld.com/article/21399...l-machine.html

    That's all for now
    Hello again hmscott!

    I finally put up my RAM screenshots up in the other thread and thank you for your advice there...

    You've already given me SO MUCH here I'm making some progress. (had to wait for the USB 3.0 Sandisk Extreme I bought on Amazon. Mentioned it in the RAM thread.)

    I just wanted to know your thoughts on installing IRST, making sure I have Trim, and any other important BIOS settings, CMS on/off? etc...before I image the new EVO 840 SSD.

    Here's a screenshot of the 750GB HDD as it sits right now...

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Disk Management AFTER creating Recovery Image_Asus BakTrkr_USB.PNG 
Views:	7 
Size:	136.9 KB 
ID:	37560


    Should I also use Backtracker to "Back up ASUS Driver/App"? then there's the "System Recovery" feature for system settings...does Backtracker stay on the HDD after I made the image to USB? And would it be useful to have on the new SSD?

    I hope these questions don't sound TOO stupid. Again, you've already given me a lot to work with and I REALLY am grateful and AM coming along.

    I just want to make sure I do everything I'm supposed to do BEFORE I image the new SSD and take the HDD out of the Boot bay #1, you know?

    Thanks again!
    Last edited by SupaFaztG; 06-12-2014 at 10:08 PM.

  9. #19
    ROG Guru: Platinum Belt Array hmscott PC Specs
    hmscott PC Specs
    Laptop (Model)Asus G750JH-DB71 (legacy)
    MotherboardAsus G750JH Intel HM87
    ProcessorIntel i7-4700HQ XTU Cores 36x/35x/34x/34x Cache 36x -50mV undervolt
    Memory (part number)Hyundai Electronics HMT41GS6AFR8A-PB 1.35v DDR3L-1600MHz
    Graphics Card #1Nvidia 780m Asus GPU Tweak OC 932mhz/6300mhz
    Sound CardRealtek v6.0.1.7469 driver
    MonitorAUO B173HW02 V1 Custom Refresh 85hz
    Storage #1RAID0 2x M.2 SATA Crucial MX200 512GB CT500MX200SSD6
    Storage #2Crucial 512GB 2.5" MX200 CT500MX200SSD1
    Power Supply230w AC Power Adapter 19.5v
    Keyboard Logitech k400 Wireless KB/Trackpad
    Headset Sony MDR-XB500 Wired and Sennheiser RS-220 Wireless TOSLINK
    OS Windows 8.1 + 8 Linux VM's + Windows 10 Technical Preview
    Network RouterAsus RT-AC68U DLINK DIR-655

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    Quote Originally Posted by SupaFaztG View Post
    Hello again hmscott!
    I finally put up my RAM screenshots up in the other thread and thank you for your advice there...
    You've already given me SO MUCH here I'm making some progress. (had to wait for the USB 3.0 Sandisk Extreme I bought on Amazon. Mentioned it in the RAM thread.)
    I just wanted to know your thoughts on installing IRST, making sure I have Trim, and any other important BIOS settings, CMS on/off? etc...before I image the new EVO 840 SSD.

    Here's a screenshot of the 750GB HDD as it sits right now...

    Should I also use Backtracker to "Back up ASUS Driver/App"? then there's the "System Recovery" feature for system settings...does Backtracker stay on the HDD after I made the image to USB? And would it be useful to have on the new SSD?

    I hope these questions don't sound TOO stupid. Again, you've already given me a lot to work with and I REALLY am grateful and AM coming along.

    I just want to make sure I do everything I'm supposed to do BEFORE I image the new SSD and take the HDD out of the Boot bay #1, you know?

    Thanks again!
    SupaFaztG, you don't need to make any BIOS changes, leave the boot options at defaults, since you are doing a restore from the Asus Backtracker it will restore with the same options to the SSD as were on the HD, a GPT partition with UEFI security.

    TRIM is there by default. With an SSD RAID setup you have to tickle Windows to recognize it as an SSD instead of an HD, but you don't need to worry about that.

    Use all the backup options with Asus Backtracker, it makes sense to take it all, because you want to recreate the same layout on the SSD with the same files / etc. After your restore is done, you can merge partitions and make a large C partition / D partition, but for now, don't worry about it.

    Preserve your original HD partitions and files for a while, or forever, just in case the flash drive disappears / fails / gets reused for another purpose - you can always use the DATA partition on the HD for storing/archiving - just leave the boot partitions / recovery partitions as they are for emergency use - you could always swap it back in to the laptop - pulling the SSD - should you need to send in the laptop for repair.

    Have fun

  10. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by hmscott View Post
    SupaFaztG, you don't need to make any BIOS changes, leave the boot options at defaults, since you are doing a restore from the Asus Backtracker it will restore with the same options to the SSD as were on the HD, a GPT partition with UEFI security.

    TRIM is there by default. With an SSD RAID setup you have to tickle Windows to recognize it as an SSD instead of an HD, but you don't need to worry about that.

    Use all the backup options with Asus Backtracker, it makes sense to take it all, because you want to recreate the same layout on the SSD with the same files / etc. After your restore is done, you can merge partitions and make a large C partition / D partition, but for now, don't worry about it.

    Preserve your original HD partitions and files for a while, or forever, just in case the flash drive disappears / fails / gets reused for another purpose - you can always use the DATA partition on the HD for storing/archiving - just leave the boot partitions / recovery partitions as they are for emergency use - you could always swap it back in to the laptop - pulling the SSD - should you need to send in the laptop for repair.

    Have fun
    Ahhhhh....OK

    I've been patient with getting the right hardware and not making too many moves without verifying important things first.

    As I've said before, thanks very much for all of your guidance and expertise.

    The only other thing is do I update all the windows updates before I do the Backtracker drivers/apps backup on the HDD? Or do I do them at all on the HDD? Or does it not matter?

    Excellent then!

    I'll re-post when all's said and done just to show.

    Maybe it'll help others too to see the end result.

    Great!
    Last edited by SupaFaztG; 06-13-2014 at 07:11 PM.

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