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  1. #51
    untouched Array Praz's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by TeddyRaspin View Post
    @Praz

    Can you tell me if you have to use the IC Clamp to do this job please ?
    Hello

    Yes. Both 3M and Pomona versions work.

  2. #52
    ROG Guru: Orange Belt Array R5Eandme PC Specs
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    Question What about using EEPROM programmer to "clone" bad chip from good one?

    Thank you all I found this thread very useful as I am dealing with a corrupted BIOS1 chip after an attempted COPY from BIOS2 (boot loops with Q code 00) on an R5E/U3.1 motherboard. My question is: what about using a chip programmer to read the contents of the good chip into a bin or hex file, then using that to program the bad chip? Physically removing the good chip and placing it in the programmers ZIF socket to read it. I am thinking it would be simpler than using FD44Editor to manually program mobo-specific parameters such as mac address, UUID, S/N into a downloaded BIOS image file from ASUS, then writing to chip? I will be using the GQ USB Universal Programmer (GQ-4x4) and its software interface which looks very similar to EZP2010/2013. GQ-4x4 works with the Winbond W25Q128FVxx chips on my R5E.

  3. #53
    ROG Guru: Orange Belt Array R5Eandme PC Specs
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    Was able to clone the good BIOS2 chip to a replacement BIOS1 chip

    Sorry for my previous questions but I found a solution with help from the good technical info on the forum. On my dual BIOS R5E, I used the COPY BIOS2 to BIOS1 command, which corrupted the BIOS1 chip. It would enter an on/off post loop with Q-code “00”, a situation others have experienced. To replace the corrupted BIOS1 chip, I was able to clone my good BIOS2 chip to a new BIOS1 chip that I ordered from www.bios-chip24.com. They are both Windbond 25Q128FVIQ EEPROMs. The corrupted BIOS chip was toasted. My SPI programmer couldn't read Device_ID, Manufacturer or chip Device Type, which are always present from the chip manufacturer. Device_ID was "FFFFFF" while it should have been "EF4018". Using a GQ-4x4 SPI programmer, I read the contents of the good BIOS2 chip into a bin file and used the DF44Editor program to verify the presence of my unique MAC address, motherboard serial number, and BIOS UUID (thanks to all who developed FD44Editor!). The chip from www.bios-chip24.com arrived flashed with latest BIOS vers 3701, however, DF44Editor revealed no settings for MAC, UUID and S/N. So to avoid problems with Windows authentication or any other system that uses those unique mobo identifiers, I used the SPI programmer to clone the contents of the OEM BIOS2 chip to the replacement BIOS1 chip. I erased the replacement chip, checked for blank, loaded the bin file from BIOS2 into the programmer buffer and wrote/verified to BIOS1 chip. The checksums of BIOS2 and BIOS1 matched. DF44Editor showed that the newly cloned BIOS1 chip had correct MAC, UUID and S/N. I replaced the chips into the R5E and they are both posting nicely. As others have said, If you don't have a backup chip to clone from, the MAC is on a sticker on the side of the 24 pin mobo power connector, the S/N is on a sticker at the top of the mobo (the 15 digits after the 000 and it is different from what appears on the mobo box in my case ), but the UUID is hard to get, unless you have previously run from the cmd prompt: wmic csproduct get name, identifyingnumber,uuid. But apparently there is a big-endian/little-endian confusion issue as described in the BIOS Chip Recovery Program post and video https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1TaZqJPG75A . This thread is a great discussion and I learned enough to get my dual BIOS chips back on track and avoid having to RMA the mobo.

  4. #54
    ROG Guru: Orange Belt Array R5Eandme PC Specs
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    Curious to know how ASUS BIOS update utilities work

    Hello. Does anyone know why when you use a BIOS update utility such as BIOS FLASHBACK or EZ FLASH 2, that it does not overwrite the unique identifier fields for your motherboard that are stored on the BIOS chip? I am talking about MAC address, motherboard serial number and UUID. Are these stored in write-protected blocks on the BIOS chip, or does the update utility avoid overwriting them by writing the UEFI program code elsewhere on the chip? I ask because I have a replacement BIOS chip that was written using an SPI EEPROM programmer with the bin file read from the original good ASUS bios chip, as described in previous post. Curious to know what happens if ASUS releases a new BIOS and I use FLASHBACK on the cloned chip. There are ways around problems, but I am just curious about what's under the hood here. Thanks!

  5. #55
    ROG Junior Member Array
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    Hi LiveOrDie,

    Thanks for sharing the solutions.

    Personally, I have tried the reset of the CMOS, the removal of the motherboard battery and the bootable USB key with the Bios on it to setup the last version through DOS, but it didn't work.

    I have been able to resolve the situation with the help of a SPI programmer and a test clip. It flashes the Bios even if the computer won't start.

    You can find a guide here: Guide to flash a Bios with a SPI CH341A mini programmer

    Good luck!

  6. #56
    ROG Guru: Brown Belt Array LiveOrDie PC Specs
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    Quote Originally Posted by R5Eandme View Post
    Hello. Does anyone know why when you use a BIOS update utility such as BIOS FLASHBACK or EZ FLASH 2, that it does not overwrite the unique identifier fields for your motherboard that are stored on the BIOS chip? I am talking about MAC address, motherboard serial number and UUID. Are these stored in write-protected blocks on the BIOS chip, or does the update utility avoid overwriting them by writing the UEFI program code elsewhere on the chip? I ask because I have a replacement BIOS chip that was written using an SPI EEPROM programmer with the bin file read from the original good ASUS bios chip, as described in previous post. Curious to know what happens if ASUS releases a new BIOS and I use FLASHBACK on the cloned chip. There are ways around problems, but I am just curious about what's under the hood here. Thanks!
    Wow this is old but both of those utilities are designed to only flash sections of the bios chip with skipping some, as each bios has its own info on it so flashing the whole chip would remove this info and replace it with nothing.

  7. #57
    ROG Guru: Orange Belt Array R5Eandme PC Specs
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    Quote Originally Posted by LiveOrDie View Post
    Wow this is old but both of those utilities are designed to only flash sections of the bios chip with skipping some, as each bios has its own info on it so flashing the whole chip would remove this info and replace it with nothing.
    Thanks for this great info LiveOrDie,
    I suspected that BIOS flash utilities worked that way, writing to selective generic blocks and skipping blocks with info specific to your mobo. It sure is handy to have SPI EEPROM capabilities as it reads and writes the entire chip contents, but you need to first have obtained the bin file from your good chip before it gets corrupted

  8. #58
    ROG Guru: Orange Belt Array R5Eandme PC Specs
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    MotherboardRampage V Extreme/U3.1
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    Memory (part number)Corsair Vengeance LPX CMK64GX4M8A2400C14
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    MonitorAcer B286HK 4K UHD
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    Storage #2Samsung 850 Pro 1TB SSD
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    Quote Originally Posted by Praz View Post
    Hello

    As I wrote above we do programming in-circuit. That means no desoldering is required. However, I cannot speak to the capabilities of the cheap hobby type programmers having this capability.
    Praz or others:

    When you do SPI programming of BIOS chip "in-circuit" do you have mobo powered down and use the programmer voltage supply, or do you apply mobo standby power and connect all leads to the SPI port except for the voltage supply (e.g. Vcc pin)? I have a Willem GQ-4x4 programmer.

    Thanks

  9. #59
    New ROGer Array lakulo123's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Null View Post
    LiveOrDie,

    Thanks so much for all your information, through both your updated video tut and cool techno music, sad to say
    i have to mute it now (Watched your videos to many times.) and I'm still having double zero troubleZ, no success here...

    I'm still stuck with the Zero's code at cold boot "00" (coincidentally enough my name is "Null" so i get to see ( . )( . ) all the time )
    but i think my Rampage V Extreme is worse then just a SPI Flash Reprogram to the chip, PLZzzzzz prove me wrong...

    What happened about two months ago i received my motherboard and set it up fine and was tweaking in the bios (no voltages or anything,
    just standard settings, enabling/disabling unused ports and peripherals etc). One bios got corrupted (unknown how) and i think both chips were version 503,
    so i thought perhaps i should use the copy 1 to 2 function (Good over Bad), pelajari cara menjalankan bisnis dropship tanpa perang harga dan langsung praktek gratis. instantly after attempting this, i knew on "Reboot" from the new code "00" it
    was screwed, I tried "Flash Back", but still the same after all my troubleshooting and your tips and tricks here, I'm still stuck at this code.

    A question for you LiveOrDie, after loosing your S/N's how did you get them back? I have my Mobo S/N but i don't have my Mac Address Or UUID,

    I have my stickers:
    Attachment 47818
    Attachment 47819

    Do these matter for at least a successful boot up? And anyone that has any suggestions or help please shout out. Thanks!!

    Null
    -----------------------------------
    The rest is just basic info i have & tried:
    I bought a EZP2010 downloaded every Bios version from ASUS website and combined every feasible way to flash the bios, i counted 63+ combinations
    but I've probably tried over 100+ and spent at least 20 hours troubleshooting this.

    Things i have tried (Short List):
    -Cleared Cmos, Pulled Battery, Unplugged the Power Supply,
    -Removed all components (Graphics Card/Memory) leaving ATX Power Cords plugged to Mainboard/Motherboard
    -Re-seated: CPU, Graphics Card, Memory, Motherboard.
    -Safe Switch, Slow Mode, LN2, Toggled Disabled/Enabled Pci-E (1-4) Switches, Bios Chips Toggle (three W25Q128BV's, bought one on ebay)
    -FlashBack to Every Bios Version 503, 603, 706, 802, 901, 1001, 1103, 1201, 1302 (Versions 706 & 1201 have been removed from ASUS site, i still have if anyone needs them, they were probably deemed unsafe somehow though)
    -All Bios Versions Reprogramming W25Q128BV without any S/N using just UEFITool
    -All Bios Versions Reprogramming W25Q128BV with FAKE S/N using just FD44Editor (used correct Motherboard S/N: MT7EAM0BX033715)

    Things i haven't tried:
    -All Bios Versions Reprogramming W25Q128BV with Real S/N.

    Future notes to anyone attempting this:
    Out of frustration, DO NOT plug in/turn your W25Q128BV Chip backwards thinking that maybe it will work.. it won't.. (The chip gets so hot to fry point, but mine somehow still works after cool down, and lucky my fingertips didn't fall off on extraction).
    Backup any data you have before attempting any modifications -run LiveOrDie's scripts to extract your Mac Address and UUID if possible!
    UEFITool is not needed if you are using FD44Editor, the UEFITool is only to remove the first 2KB the CAP files have to get to the core description(s) Gbe(Mac Address) / bios image, FD44Editor already does this for you.
    FD44Editor Author: "CodeRush" Tutorial - http://hardforum.com/showthread.php?t=1726429
    http://www.techpowerup.com/forums/threads/need-help-changing-a-asus-bios-cap-file-into-a-rom-file.208236/
    http://www.legitreviews.com/intel-x9...unknown_150008
    I think this is similar to what I have faced before. I have updated the bios and ended on the damage to my motherboard. This is very risky if not done by experts. Even the tutorials that I got, also nothing helps. My advice, you better to buy a new one, because it is almost impossible to repair.

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