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  1. #1
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    Building custom pc cheaper than buying gaming laptop? Ideas/Suggestions

    I probably know the answer to this, but I was wondering if building a custom pc is cheaper than buying a gaming laptop? I really wanted to build my own pc, but I don't much room in my house and plus I wanted something portable for school. I wanted to also game at the same time. I also would like to know how much it would cost to build a pc that can at least run every modern game at around 60 fps or higher.

  2. #2
    ROG Guru: Green Belt Array
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    For the money that you can get a decent G751/G752, you can buy an i7-4790K / GTX970 / 16GB RAM (Kingston HyperX or Corsair Dominator sets, maybe G.Skill) / SSD (PCIe at this point) + HDD / Case (or re-use your old one) / ~750w PSU (Delta or Seasonic recommended, Corsair use them), a very good motherboard (ASUS recommended) and maybe even a nice closed-loop water cooler for the CPU (Corsair H100 for example) and some fans for the case if it does not come with any good ones.

    Not many games will top that. Of course, it's best to spend on the GPU, so you could get a good K-series i5 instead and grab a GTX980 or GTX980Ti.

    If you can find the cash, might be worth going for a i7-6700 and 16GB of DDR4 RAM with the corresponding motherboard.

  3. #3
    ROG Guru: Gold Belt Array Clintlgm PC Specs
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    Laptop (Model)Asus G752VY DH72
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    Yes its a matter of priorities, A Gaming notebook will fill all your requirement Pretty Well, the upgrade path is very limited maybe RAM or hard drives what you buy is what you will have until you buy again.

    A home built Gaming Desktop will game really very well and be upgradeable. However it's rather difficult to use portable I mean you can build a LAN Party type small platform gamer desktop that is some what portable. But your not going to take it to class with you.

    So for you it's really more a matter of what you need rather than the cost of a Desktop. Desktops are always cheaper and upgradeable you can always take your tablet to school with you?
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  4. #4
    AntiMatter Guru ROG Array chrsplmr's Avatar
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    I agree with Edweird .. It cost money to go portable. That money, unless you need portable, better serves in the Desktop version. .c.

  5. #5
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    In my country at least (Bulgaria) it was more expensive to build a PC than to buy a G751.Taking into account the money spent on a decent monitor+ decent keyboard+webcam and if you wanna be precise an UPS (because battery DUH) makes it like 100$ more expensive here (not counting the UPS).The argument about taking it "to class"with you is not valid for me cuz I don't think the G751 is discrete enough for any type of class activities as it will completely cover my face when I put it in front of me and the weight is not something to laugh at.Why I chose it for is the fact that it is an all in one package which I can transfer to a different location for example when I go to the country side for a weekend etc and that simply works.Also I have a Macbook Air for class so in most case scenarios the best answer is both.Get a decent desktop OR the G751 and some portable notebook (there are plenty of cheap chromebooks you don't need to spend a fortune)

  6. #6
    NOT YOU Array Joystick's Avatar
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    I suggest you wait some month. Since at Intel they're not introducing innovative cpus, people don't need to buy new PCs/labtops, so to boost sales they changed their mind: now Thunderbolt eGPU is good.

    If you need a notebook to use on battery and a lot of computing power you have 6 possible choices:
    1. buying a GTX980 desktop GPU notebook and watching your battery drain in a couple of seconds
    2. buying a GTX9xxM notebook and being consumed with rage
    3. buying a laptop (as a Zenbook) and...
      1. a desktop PC
      2. a GTX980 desktop GPU notebook (too much money? I can help)
      3. a GTX9xxM notebook (no desktop GPU? You're so Middle Ages)
    4. buying a laptop with Thunderbolt 3 (and a really good i7 CPU) and an eGPU adapter


  7. #7
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    All your guys responses were awesome and helpful and yh it is more reasonable to just take a tablet or a smaller laptop to school and then just build a gaming pc at home as it is cheaper and FUN. I might just use my G751 JT until next year and sell it off and save more money to build a pc. Another question I had was if I should build a PC for myself or is it also good to just build online and order the whole component? Sites like Xidax sound very trustworthy and don't seem that expensive. Will it be cheaper to build by my hands or have the company build it? And also when upgrading parts, do you usually sell the current product or just throw it away? For example if I had a 750 and I want to upgrade it to a 770, can I just sell the 750 instead of throwing it away?
    Last edited by shahidrahman; 10-13-2015 at 04:09 PM. Reason: add

  8. #8
    ROG Guru: Black Belt Array Korth PC Specs
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    I don't know Xidax but I've bought from a similar (if larger) laptop-building business called Clevo/Sager.

    These companies do laptops, they have access to all sorts of spare laptop parts, they might even make a few custom parts, they know how it all fits together, they know how to pack the most tech into a constrained form factor. An end-user has few options for buying a laptop motherboard or keyboard or chassis plastic, outside of normal consumer channels, small quantities (like just enough pieces to build one unit) cost more to obtain and it's sometimes difficult to confirm compatibility or fit before the parts all arrive. If you go this route you'll be building yourself a major project and you'll pay premiums on everything and you may or may not be able to get everything you want - but it's not impossible and people can DIY custom laptops quite successfully (that's where all these laptop companies start up, lol). But it's hardly worth the effort if you're planning on building a single unit or doing "casual" customization/upgrades.

    If you use an existing laptop as a base platform then you're locked into whatever happens to fit inside it. This might lock you into some limited hardware choices, it often locks you into whatever upgrade path the manufacturer offers. It might be easy to swap motherboards between G751 models, but it would be difficult to find a compatible Z170 motherboard if Asus doesn't happen to sell one. You're also locked into whatever GPU upgrade path (or lack of it) they might offer, even things like the mPCIe form factor are not yet really standardized across all manufacturers.

    You can upgrade the drives and memory on almost any laptop, unless it's already populated with the best it can support or the manufacturer chose to install fewer slots/ports/connectors on the motherboard than a full-sized chipset could run. You can often upgrade your battery with something newer (and more energy-dense) or something bigger. If you're unafraid of some soldering then you can completely upgrade your charging circuitry or internally splice USB ports into hardware features (like WiFi, GPS, whatever) your laptop doesn't natively support.

    If you want a big project and the ultimate laptop then it's a good option. If you want less headache then go with a laptop company. You pay a premium either way. If you're targeting a top-tier extreme-performance model then you'll get better bang for the buck buying a premade business/gaming laptop and you'll get far better bang for the buck building a desktop. Research Intel/AMD mobile chipsets and procs (which are usually soldered together as a pair these days) then narrow your choices down to the laptop companies which offer the platform you want - how you obtain your chassis, plastics, keyboard, etc (and how you fit it all together) is another problem entirely. Be prepared to (re)manufacture your own heatpipes and rads and ducts from scratch, lol.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Korth View Post
    I don't know Xidax but I've bought from a similar (if larger) laptop-building business called Clevo/Sager.

    These companies do laptops, they have access to all sorts of spare laptop parts, they might even make a few custom parts, they know how it all fits together, they know how to pack the most tech into a constrained form factor. An end-user has few options for buying a laptop motherboard or keyboard or chassis plastic, outside of normal consumer channels, small quantities (like just enough pieces to build one unit) cost more to obtain and it's sometimes difficult to confirm compatibility or fit before the parts all arrive. If you go this route you'll be building yourself a major project and you'll pay premiums on everything and you may or may not be able to get everything you want - but it's not impossible and people can DIY custom laptops quite successfully (that's where all these laptop companies start up, lol). But it's hardly worth the effort if you're planning on building a single unit or doing "casual" customization/upgrades.

    If you use an existing laptop as a base platform then you're locked into whatever happens to fit inside it. This might lock you into some limited hardware choices, it often locks you into whatever upgrade path the manufacturer offers. It might be easy to swap motherboards between G751 models, but it would be difficult to find a compatible Z170 motherboard if Asus doesn't happen to sell one. You're also locked into whatever GPU upgrade path (or lack of it) they might offer, even things like the mPCIe form factor are not yet really standardized across all manufacturers.

    You can upgrade the drives and memory on almost any laptop, unless it's already populated with the best it can support or the manufacturer chose to install fewer slots/ports/connectors on the motherboard than a full-sized chipset could run. You can often upgrade your battery with something newer (and more energy-dense) or something bigger. If you're unafraid of some soldering then you can completely upgrade your charging circuitry or internally splice USB ports into hardware features (like WiFi, GPS, whatever) your laptop doesn't natively support.

    If you want a big project and the ultimate laptop then it's a good option. If you want less headache then go with a laptop company. You pay a premium either way. If you're targeting a top-tier extreme-performance model then you'll get better bang for the buck buying a premade business/gaming laptop and you'll get far better bang for the buck building a desktop. Research Intel/AMD mobile chipsets and procs (which are usually soldered together as a pair these days) then narrow your choices down to the laptop companies which offer the platform you want - how you obtain your chassis, plastics, keyboard, etc (and how you fit it all together) is another problem entirely. Be prepared to (re)manufacture your own heatpipes and rads and ducts from scratch, lol.
    Thank you taking the time to reply and yeah I've never knew you can build your own laptop online. That's very interesting. It does seem a bit hard to custom build PC so I was just going to go the laptop route but people also say that its pretty easy and fun. I just have to check out youtube videos. Ordering from a company does sound good too as it will be professionals build my pc so no worries there. I'll just end up doing that instead. Thank you very much again.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Joystick View Post
    I suggest you wait some month. Since at Intel they're not introducing innovative cpus, people don't need to buy new PCs/labtops, so to boost sales they changed their mind: now Thunderbolt eGPU is good.

    If you need a notebook to use on battery and a lot of computing power you have 6 possible choices:
    1. buying a GTX980 desktop GPU notebook and watching your battery drain in a couple of seconds
    2. buying a GTX9xxM notebook and being consumed with rage
    3. buying a laptop (as a Zenbook) and...
      1. a desktop PC
      2. a GTX980 desktop GPU notebook (too much money? I can help)
      3. a GTX9xxM notebook (no desktop GPU? You're so Middle Ages)
    4. buying a laptop with Thunderbolt 3 (and a really good i7 CPU) and an eGPU adapter

    That product sounds awesome, but how exactly does it work? The video was good, but I didn't quite understand. ;x

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